Project assembly - Is it wise to paint during dry-fit?

cmarzahn

Chuck
Corporate Member
So... Here's my dilemma.
I'm in Matthews and building this mudroom bench for the daughter in Atlanta.
Of course, it ain't gonna fit in the Highlander.

Don't judge me. I'm using pocket hole joinery.
(Still very much a newbie to woodworking!)

I have the bench seat stained so I won't be gluing anything to it.
But I would like to paint as much as I can before assembling so I have that part done before final assembling and installation down in Atlanta. So...
Would it be wise to put enough screws in during dry-fit to go ahead and paint it without glue-up?
You can see the three sections which could be handled/painted separately then broken down for transport.
Overall, it's about 5 foot wide and 6 foot tall.

You know... then take it back apart, carry it down and then assemble with glue, clamps and screws down there.
Would something like that work? Tips? Tricks? Am I asking for trouble?

Thinking I could shoot a final coat down there after intalled? HVLP, that is...
What say you?

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Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
My first thought would be to glue/ assemble the three sections, then paint each section as a unit. Once on site, do the final assembly, and then touch up the paint. You may also want to caulk any seams once everything is in place prior to the final painting. No need to spray, if it's just touch ups along the joints the shadow lines will hide imperfections, and you use a foam roller for any scratches on the faces.

Of course, this assumes that the three sections will fit in your vehicle. My guess is the middle section would be too wide.

I would not screw the sections together, paint, and then disassemble. The paint will most likely tear/ crack, or the pieces won't come apart. You're better off painting the pieces individually before transport, or leaving it unfinished and then painting on site.

Third option is to rent a trailer. You can rent a 5x8 trailer for $100. This assumes you have a trailer hitch of course. I'd still do it in three sections, to make it easier to get into the house.
 

cmarzahn

Chuck
Corporate Member
My first thought would be to glue/ assemble the three sections, then paint each section as a unit. Once on site, do the final assembly, and then touch up the paint. You may also want to caulk any seams once everything is in place prior to the final painting. No need to spray, if it's just touch ups along the joints the shadow lines will hide imperfections, and you use a foam roller for any scratches on the faces.

Of course, this assumes that the three sections will fit in your vehicle. My guess is the middle section would be too wide.

I would not screw the sections together, paint, and then disassemble. The paint will most likely tear/ crack, or the pieces won't come apart. You're better off painting the pieces individually before transport, or leaving it unfinished and then painting on site.

Third option is to rent a trailer. You can rent a 5x8 trailer for $100. This assumes you have a trailer hitch of course. I'd still do it in three sections, to make it easier to get into the house.
Good thoughts. Nope the center section won’t fit. But the other two sure will. I can do those here and assemble the center there. Thanks!


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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
2 center section and one section on each end? Correct? How deep is it front to back? Is it plywood?

I'd assemble it without glue and leave it unpainted until you get to Atlanta. Paint it there or have your daughter paint it.

You don't have to apologize for using pocket hole screws either!
 
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cmarzahn

Chuck
Corporate Member
I see 4 sections, not 3. How deep is it front to back? Is it plywood?

I'd assemble it without glue and leave it unpainted until you get to Atlanta. Paint it there or have your daughter paint it.

You don't have to apologize for using pocket hole screws either!
Ah. Yes. 4 going horizontally. 3 from top to bottom. It’s all 3/4” Baltic Birch. The bench is 20” deep. The back is 14”. The back view shows detail of sections and pocket holes.


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Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
IF you want to get anal, buy the plugs for pocket holes, cut em and sand em flush then no holes when you paint :}:}:}
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
Build it in 2 pieces, an upper (complete) and a lower. Dont forget to include cleats for screws to mount it to the wall. I would paint it and touch up as necessary on site. I threw together something similar at my old house prior to selling
 

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cmarzahn

Chuck
Corporate Member
Build it in 2 pieces, an upper (complete) and a lower. Dont forget to include cleats for screws to mount it to the wall. I would paint it and touch up as necessary on site. I threw together something similar at my old house prior to selling
Very, very nice!


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Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
my 2c; rent a trailer. This way you complete them where you have all the tools necessary,finishing etc. I say this from experience, I built a huge media room for my son in SC near Spartanburg. I live in Zebulon. with everything complete, just wrap them in moving blankets,strap em down, take the long drive, get there, some help unload,put em in place, enjoy the time with your daughter,rather than busting your butt to finish them when you get there. Drop off trailer, drive home. remember other wise you need all tools,cabinets,paint,caulk etc, once there you will find out you left what you need most at home :}:}:}:} dont ask how I know this, not worth aggravation
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Short answer: Do not paint during dry fit. Paint will seep into the joints. Masking the glue surfaces on the parts and painting or priming them individually before assembly (or transport) is a viable option. That technique is often used for stained projects as well.
 

cmarzahn

Chuck
Corporate Member
I've been thinking about the tape.. concerned that paint will bleed under. What about this: Do the dry-fit and mark lines on the unpainted wood to mark off the areas where glue would be applied. I suppose that from there I could tape, prime and paint it. I'm thinking that I'd have to pull and re-tape after each coat (still wet) so I don't tear off paint when dried. Interested to hear more about this process "often used for stained projects."
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
When you tape joints ( or anything really) the trick is paint from the tape to the wood. Start by burnishing the tape down especially the edges, then start your paint ON the tape and brush towards the wood. That way you’re not pushing paint under the tape. I hope I explained that clearly.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
I wouldn't worry about a little paint encroaching on the glue area as the screws will hold it together pretty well by themselves. Be prepared to cut out the floor molding on the wall, you'll probably have to caulk it and paint there. You may have to shim it if the floor isn't level. I would put a piece of 1/4" ply across the bottom stringers (maybe a block in the middle for support) and a rail across the bottom that you can scribe to the floor and hide the plywood edge. Also, bring a strip of molding on the side that you can scribe to the wall.
 

Rick_B

Rick
Corporate Member
I may not be following - are you thinking about assembling the pocket screws, removing them and then reinserting the pocket screws? My limited experience is that pocket holes don't like to be taken out and put back in

Rick
 

Canuck

Wayne
Corporate Member
I have done several cabinets (base and wall) and drawers using no glue....just pocket screws and they have held up well.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I agree with the trailer comments. U haul has a 6x12 enclosed trailer that probably would hold it. They also have smaller ones. The 6x12 has surge brakes, I pulled one repeatedly with a smaller SUV than a Highlander. They also rent blankets you could use to protect it.

Or you could flat pack it. Do no assembly prior to delivery and put it all together there. It is much easier to finish horizontal surfaces. Tape over the joints will give the glue a chance to help make the finished piece rigid. Or you can carefully assess how much assembly can still be done and fit in the SUV.

I find when I try and do work away from my house that I always need tools that I have at home. My list of what to bring is never complete. It even happens to me when I volunteer at church where we have a fairly extensive shop available. I still want my tools including tools the church does not have but also sometimes the tools I am familar with. That is one reason I suggest getting a trailer. Nice to know it is done and you won't end up needing something you have at home but not there.
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Jim LMAO seems we have same t shirts and gremlins. I bought a 6x12 v nose just for my sons job, it involved many trips to and from, cheaper to buy than rent in my case. walk them in strap them tight put in everything you know you need then take half of those you know you don't need. :D :D :cool::cool::cool:;););)
 

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