How would you cut a 2" square window into a fiber drum?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Ethan Poole's modification here:


has me thinking that I should do the same on my dust collection drum. The only problem is I'm using a fiber drum and I don't want to booger it up. How would you do this on a fiber drum? Drill then Jigsaw?
(I know there are a few whiz bang full dust bin inventions but I'm very interested in this simple solution. Thanks Ethan!)
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
router would be cleaner cut.:icon_thum longish strait bit, plywood template and scraps to steady the template. double sided tape or hot glue to hold the template in place. clamps tend to get in the way. I could freehand the cut but a template is the best way to go.:gar-Bi
 

Mt. Gomer

New User
Travis
I was thinking router with a template too. Would be cool if you could use something flexible enough to conform to the surface of the durm.... Perhaps hardboard?
 

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Thanks Guys!
I have the HF Multi Tool and didn't even think about it. Have to give that a shot. Now...I need to make some windows.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
I was thinking router with a template too. Would be cool if you could use something flexible enough to conform to the surface of the durm.... Perhaps hardboard?
Bandsaw out a saddle to fit radius of the drum. Cut it in half, and attach a template sized for your opening. The saddle pieces need to NOT be in the area being routed out. Drill a starter hole, attach saddle with template and route away.
 

Dean Maiorano

New User
Dino
Mark,

I have some 1/8" thick polycarbonate I'd mail to you free of charge, if you'd like. Polycarbonate is cold and heat form-able (much more pliable than acrylic), is well known for being practically unbreakable (doesn't crack at drilled holes), machines better than acrylic with woodworking tools and this specific type is scratch resistant. The picture is of one of the sizes that I have (5" x 19"). In order to mail to you I'd prefer to cut it into halves or thirds, across the length, to make for a smaller package. I can send you more than one of that size piece if you'd like.



I have 10 pieces total, if anyone else is interested PM me.

Dean
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
My goodness, what have I started?!?! :rotflm:

I used a utility knive to make my cuts, but as the owner of a Fein Multimaster (which I did not have at the time), I love that suggestion as well. I would also think a pilot hole and jigsaw would work well.

I used roughly 1/16" polycarbonate (lexan) for my windows. A torch was used to gently heat the windows to set a curve roughly matching the waste drum. Truthfully though, at 1/16" I could have just gotten away with riveting them in and allowing the drum to bend them, but preforming them better maintains the shape of the drum. Don't forget to seal the edges with silicone to preserve the vacuum and normal airflow within the drum.

I'm glad someone found my idea useful, I know it has saved me alot of trouble once I switched over to an opaque waste bin system (the original JDS system used a 40gal bag with a steel frame that sat inside the bag to hold its shape -- the catch being you had to carefully work the frame back out of the waste in order to dispose of the contents).

If you have any questions as to how I did anything, feel free to ask me. I'm sure other members will only help to further improve upon my idea.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
One other thought, for those not accustomed to cutting plastic sheet goods: most any 60-80 tooth crosscut saw blade will cut plastic nicely. TCG grind blades are supposed to be more optimal, but I have also done very will with more common ATB blades. The plastic cuts very cleanly and quickly -- just like wood -- just beware that the plastic 'sawdust' that comes off the blade will be fairly hot. Not hot enough to burn you (or cause other harm) but hot enough to possibly startle anyone not familiar with cutting plastic on the table saw.

I also cut nonferrous metals on the table saw and bandsaw now and then.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
Another thought, to do my layout, I prepared the layout on a sheet of paper, then taped the paper over the area of each hole and drilled a small hole in each corner to mark the corners, then connected the holes using my utility knive to cut through the plastic waste bin. I also marked the location for each of my rivets on the paper, and predrilled holes for each rivet while the paper was taped over each location. I also used the paper template to predrill the rivet holes in my lexan, ensuring a perfect fit when everything was brought together.

Since your drum is made of fiberboard, you could probably get away with screws or short bolts, but I often like rivets for the application of joining thin materials together, hence I broke out my rivets and riveter for a task like this.

Also, the ~1/16" lexan I used came from Lowes as a roughly 12"x12" sheet, not terribly expensive.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top