how loud are lathes?

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zapdafish

Steve
Senior User
Seems like I can't get home from work till at least 7pm these days and I don't want to disturb my neighbors with the high pitch of some power tools.

How loud are lathes when in use? I would rather unwind in my shop than in front of a tv and have been intersted in learning how to turn for some time now.

Are there some type of motors I should avoid for noise like in tablesaws? My tablesaw itself is quiet until it starts cutting. Are lathes like that too once you take the chisel to the wood?


thnx...Steve
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
My shop has no insulation and you can barely hear the lathe run right outside.

If you had a big out of round chunk of wood it would make a thumping sound as the walls wave in and out, but that is rare.
 

sawduster

New User
Robert
I have Delta 46-460 and I can easily listen to my music without having to turn up the radio. Very quiet. I wouldn't hesitate to use it in my house with my wife asleep in the next room :icon_thum

As Mike said, a big bowl blank can go thumpity-thump for awhile, but that is the loudest mine ever gets
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
My PM makes about as much noise as a small fan. the cutting tools make more noise than the lathe.:icon_thum If you don't mind the drive I could help you get started. No fee's either......:gar-Bi A lathe is best learned hands on. Some instruction helps but you will soon find that things that work for others may not work for you. The basics are sharp tools, light cuts and ride the bevel.:icon_thum
 

zapdafish

Steve
Senior User
My PM makes about as much noise as a small fan. the cutting tools make more noise than the lathe.:icon_thum If you don't mind the drive I could help you get started. No fee's either......:gar-Bi A lathe is best learned hands on. Some instruction helps but you will soon find that things that work for others may not work for you. The basics are sharp tools, light cuts and ride the bevel.:icon_thum

wow, thanks for the offer. It's about 2 hrs of driving and I guess that's not too bad. Been wanting to take a close look at that space box you created awhile back too :)

Are weekends ok for you? With my work schedule, I don't think I could do it on a weekday.
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
wow, thanks for the offer. It's about 2 hrs of driving and I guess that's not too bad. Been wanting to take a close look at that space box you created awhile back too :)

Are weekends ok for you? With my work schedule, I don't think I could do it on a weekday.
week ends are fine most of the time. tomorrow I will be at klingspore but sunday is free so far as I know. PM when you get a free day. :icon_thum a couple hours should get you a head start.
 

Trent Mason

New User
Trent Mason
Yep, by far one of the quietest tools in the shop. My old shop at the beach was right underneath my neighbor's bedroom and I turned bowls on it at night on a regular basis. Never heard one complaint. :thumbs_up:thumbs_up
 

jhreed

New User
james
To give you a clue. Most prudent people wear hearing protection when they use their saw, router, planer, sanders, etc. I do not know of anyone that wears hearing protection while using a lathe. My grandfather used a lathe very much at the end of the work day. Sometimes he would pick up a limb in the yard and chuck it in his lathe and make shavings. He said making shavings just calmed him down. He did make a few things on his lathe, but mostly shavings.
James
 

jhreed

New User
james
Also, our Mike Davis is a hand plane expert. Let him tell you how quiet and therapeutic a plane can be. But be careful, a plane is like a lathe in that it is a slippery slope. You will find yourself going to yardsales and flee markets looking for old redeemable planes. Then a collection starts.
James
 

sushinutnc

New User
Mike
Steve-- I'd be happy to let you play around on my ShopSmith (also in Holly Springs) this weekend, if you just want to "get your feet wet." I have pretty good experience with spindle turning and have only done roughing on green wood for hollow forms so far (waiting to build that experience after they dry). :icon_thum I'm almost entirely self-taught, so there's a VERY good chance you would only learn some of the basics along with some bad habits. :icon_cheers Since it's a ShopSmith, there are also some basic setup and operations that are different than standard lathes (e.g., the tailstock is stationary, the headstock moves).

But if you can't make it all the way up to Fred's anytime soon (and YES, it is a looooonnnnnngggg way), then you can at least have a little fun with it close to home, before learning how to really work a lathe from him. :embaresse
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Also, our Mike Davis is a hand plane expert. Let him tell you how quiet and therapeutic a plane can be. But be careful, a plane is like a lathe in that it is a slippery slope. You will find yourself going to yardsales and flee markets looking for old redeemable planes. Then a collection starts.
James
I am no expert, just like to learn and try to help others when I can.
 

Jim M.

Woody
Corporate Member
Mine is very quiet except for the constant yelling of Whoopee! Yahooo! Woweee! :icon_cheers Jim
 

Mark Stewart

New User
Mark
lathe is quiet but the cussing can get quite loud when I screw up a really nice hunk of some of the finer local trees. When you get one and make a few bowls youll be turning something and think if I just make one more pass I can fix this (thats when to quit) the cussing starts:rotflm::rotflm::rotflm::rotflm::gar-La;:gar-La;:gar-La;:gar-La;:BangHead::BangHead::BangHead:
 

timf67

Tim
Senior User
Seriously, the lathe is quiet until the cutting starts. Depending on the wood of choice and the tools used, it can be fairly quiet or it can be pretty loud... Just ask the LOML... :swoon:
 
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