Table saw wing as a router table.

Status
Not open for further replies.

NCGrimbo

NCGrimbo
Corporate Member
I've got a Unisaw with the 52" Biesemeyer fence and I can't think of when I've used more than about 24-30" of the space to the right while sawing. I've also seen a lot of people that have used some of the space as a router table. I've currently built my router table into my bench top, but I'm planning on building a Roubo bench in either 2013 or 2014. When that happens, I'll need to find a new router setup.

So, I'd like to hear from you all what are the pros and cons of using some of the right hand space on the Unisaw as a router table.

Thanks.

-NCGrimbo
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
I had my router table on my TS extension long ago. I did it because my shop at that time was so small that I had few other options. I hated it. Why? I mounted my router fence on the TS fence, which meant that I would loose my router fence location if I needed to go back to the TS for a cut or two. And it turned out that I did that a lot. I now have a standalone router table and would not go back if I had any other choice. But, with a longer extension table like yours and a separate mount for the router table fence, then I might consider it.
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
I've 4 router tables (6 if you count the Shopsmiths) and one is mounted in the TS extension. It has a separate fence because like Chris has said, it's not good to have to break down a setup because of a shared fence. It will happen that the router will ruin a piece and another will have to be ripped.

I also have a horizontal table, a standalone regular R/T and a Woodrat and they all are very good at something. However, large/long pieces always wind up on the T/S extension so I can use the saw top as an extension of the R/T. There is NO benefit in NOT using the extension as a router table. Both the fence and router can get out of the way quickly.
 
Last edited:

RoyWarren

New User
Roy
My sentiments are the same as Merrill77's comments.

I have a Unisaw with a 52" fence. When you do this you have a Unisaw with a 36" fence.

The router is always in the way. If you want to cut a wide piece of plywood you have to remove the router. I also had an Incra-Gage on the right hand side, so you can see in effect, I no longer had a 52" table.

I would recommend that you go with the stand alone table.

Roy
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have a 52" unisaw with a woodpeckers router lift mounted in the extension table and I love it. I have a small shop and I couldn't imagine dedicating the necessary space for a stand alone router table. I was sharing the router table fence with the tablesaw fence at first. This worked fine, but it was a pain when you had to make a quick tablesaw cut when using the router table. Some T-Track in the extension table for a dedicated router table fence solved that problem. When I need to to utilize more space on the tablesaw, I can remove the router table fence easily and there is no loss of tablesaw capacity. I highly recommend this setup if you are tight on shop space.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Although I can't compete with Joe on his plurality of router tables, I agree with his sentiment.

I have a 52" Vega fence on a contractor saw. My router table in the extension wing is a great space saver in my moderately sized shop. I love it. I rarely use big sheet goods so those long TS fence rails (package deal on used TS) are pretty much a waste. But I have used the large rip capacity on occasion, and do appreciate that capability. The key to this set up, as stated in posts above, is to have SEPARATE fences - my router fence is a simple clamp on "L-profile" board.

Henry W
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
This was my previous setup:

As others have indicated, if you have a separate fence you don't really lose anything. Removing the router fence/ lowering the router bit takes about 20 seconds, so it doesn't really impact your work when you have to cut a large piece.

The one thing I never liked about this setup is the lack of dust collection. Yes, you can hook a shop vac to the fence and/ or build some sort of enclosure, but it's much easier with a dedicated Norm-style cabinet. That also gives you storage. I had made plans to build a roll-away cabinet that would fit underneath the router table (using foam strips to make a tight seal)....but then I got a bigger shop and a new table saw.

If you're short on space, this is definitely the way to go.
 

NCGrimbo

NCGrimbo
Corporate Member
Thanks for the info everyone. I hadn't thought about using a seperate fence, but I do have a Bench Dog fence that I currently use, so I should be able to make that work with the new setup.

-NCGrimbo
 

RoyWarren

New User
Roy
Bas,
This is off topic, but I really like that floor of yours.

I've been thinking about re-doing my shop floor, since the epoxy paint has about all worn off. (I didn't do it right to start with) It is concrete.

What kind of tile did you use?

Roy
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Bas,
This is off topic, but I really like that floor of yours.

I've been thinking about re-doing my shop floor, since the epoxy paint has about all worn off. (I didn't do it right to start with) It is concrete.

What kind of tile did you use?

Roy
It's a polypropylene tile I got from Sam's Club. It's changed names a coupe of times, they call it BlockTile now. It's gotten quite a bit more expensive, when I bought it in '08 it was about $1.10 per sq.ft. It comes in a variety of colors.

The tiles are extremely durable, easy to install, and virtually indestructible. You'd have to take a 200lb work bench top and drop it on its point to make a dent in the floor (DAMHIKT). It cleans up easily, and you can put it directly over just about any subfloor, including concrete. It machines easily on the table saw if you need to trim tiles at the border. The tile has some "give" so it's easier on your feet and knees.

The only thing I didn't like was the hollow sound the tiles make. This is not like rubber that muffles the sound, it's hard plastic. But it's still tons better than a bare concrete floor. Also, it gives the shop a very industrial look. Great if you work on cars or do metalworking, but I prefer a more 'artisan' look. I may be a lousy woodworker, but I can at least look the part!
 

RoyWarren

New User
Roy
Thanks for the info Bas. I'll look into it.

I want something a little more forgiving than concrete, in case I drop a router bit or other cutting tools on it.

And I want something that if I decide to move a machine it won't gouge up like vinyl tile will.

Thanks again

Roy
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
I want something a little more forgiving than concrete, in case I drop a router bit or other cutting tools on it.

And I want something that if I decide to move a machine it won't gouge up like vinyl tile will.
Several of us have put down OVRX Barricade on our floors recently: http://www.ovrx.com/basement-flooring.html

I'm happy with mine. Much easier on the feet, includes insulation and vapor barrier, and is fine for the heavier home-shop equipment. Very easy to install, too.
 

petebucy4638

New User
Pete
When I was in college I worked in a shop that had a table saw with a router built-in to the right extension. It worked great for most projects, often freeing up a shaper when doing less robust profiles. It saved me from moving material around the shop from machine to machine. My current Grizzly cabinet saw has a mount for a router already built-in to the right extension table. I just bought a new router that will be installed there

I've got a Unisaw with the 52" Biesemeyer fence and I can't think of when I've used more than about 24-30" of the space to the right while sawing. I've also seen a lot of people that have used some of the space as a router table. I've currently built my router table into my bench top, but I'm planning on building a Roubo bench in either 2013 or 2014. When that happens, I'll need to find a new router setup.

So, I'd like to hear from you all what are the pros and cons of using some of the right hand space on the Unisaw as a router table.

Thanks.

-NCGrimbo
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top