Table saw sanding disc

Woodmolds

Tony
User
While reviewing one of Mike Farrington's videos on Kumiko I ran across this.


Never thought I'd want a sanding disc on a table saw. I was impressed with the concept.
While not cheap, I definitely see the value in this product and plan to order one.
 

Woodmolds

Tony
User
I apologize for the repeated post. I think Farrington does a good job on the video.

I realize it does not replace a sander or good rip blade, but it does fit a specific task.
A closer look would reveal it's does not work the same as a flat disc.
It is not an end all be all.

You'd think after fifty years of woodworking I'd have learned to keep my opinions to myself, Sorry.
 

ssmith

Scott
User
You'd think after fifty years of woodworking I'd have learned to keep my opinions to myself, Sorry.
I’m fairly new here and can only speak for myself, but doubt anyone here wants that. From what I’ve seen sharing knowledge and expertise is a given here. FWIW, I don’t normally check for prior posts either, and just thought you may be interested in the earlier discussion.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
I’m fairly new here and can only speak for myself, but doubt anyone here wants that. From what I’ve seen sharing knowledge and expertise is a given here. FWIW, I don’t normally check for prior posts either, and just thought you may be interested in the earlier discussion.
I don't know why you would say that?

If I were doing any large project that required sanding edges I would get one, the only problem is my table saw 90° stop would have to be changed and I'm not crazy about that idea.

But if you had 2 table saws its a good option to have, maybe even worth buying a cheap jobsite.

Sure beats the heck out of buying an edge sander!!!
 

ssmith

Scott
User
DrBob - I was referring only to the sentence I quoted.

As far as the table saw sanding disc goes, I have one and found it handy to deal with odd sanding situations, though others here don't advocate using them. Mine is just a flat plate - the tapered disk shown in the video Tony mentions is a nifty solution to many situations, though personally, I'd be more inclined to use a jointer and if necessary, a sanding block.
 
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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
For lack of a better term, "Table Saw Sanding Disc" seems to necessarily be applied to this device. It isn't that in reality. It is more like two cones back to back. I think it is an extremely clever design that successfully addresses all the drawbacks of a flat plate sanding disk on a table saw and the table saw fence as a guide. There's a cost in convenience of a 90º stop loss on the tilt setting. I'm impressed and wish him good luck with this gadget.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
DrBob - I was referring only to the sentence I quoted.

As far as the table saw sanding disc goes, I have one and found it handy to deal with odd sanding situations, though others here don't advocate using them. Mine is just a flat plate - the tapered disk shown in the video Tony mentions is a nifty solution to many situations, though personally, I'd be more inclined to use a jointer and if necessary, a sanding block.
Sorry.

I only have a flat disc, too. The little I've used it, did an excellent job on edges - both solid wood and MDF, especially MDF! Surprisingly no sanding marks on solid wood.

But I quit using it b/c I had too many issues with it. I think a belt sander jigged up to work on its side and a long fence could mimic an edge sander. They're also not too hard to DIY one, even oscillating.
 

Woodmolds

Tony
User
I’m fairly new here and can only speak for myself, but doubt anyone here wants that. From what I’ve seen sharing knowledge and expertise is a given here. FWIW, I don’t normally check for prior posts either, and just thought you may be interested in the earlier discussion.
The remark was not directed at you. Or the following, just venting. Just a general observation from past experiences on woodworking forums.
I didn't view it as a controversial subject either.

Sometimes I read replies to posted questions and wonder if the person replying even read the original post/question. Not just here, but most places there always seems to be someone who is ready to tell you all the better ways of doing something or how it can't possibly work while having little expenience or having never tried the method or machine or product. I'm not trying to convince anyone of my methods or processes. I generally try to ignore advice that is wrong or not the way I would do it. Most are only interested in their opinion not mine. If it works for them more power to them. I find after fifty years I'm never too experienced or old to learn new methods or processes. While I don't have unlimited funds I have the luxury of being able to try new processes or machines I find interesting, time saving or will improve my accuracy.

I had never considered a disc sander for the table saw, but was intrigued by Mike's video explanation of how it worked and how well it seemed to fit a niche. While I have a joiner and edge sander, it looked promising for some of the smaller items I do and could keep a constant dimension and quality edge.

Sorry for the ramblings.
Tony
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
So, this is not the same as the flat disc for saw alignment. I used one of those flat plates back in the 80s. It didn't work well.

Tony got me to look again and now I see this is slightly cone shaped. I would think you could set a square to the sanding side and tilt the blade easily enough. If you wanted to sand freehand then just use that side and leave the 90 stop alone.

I think this might be handy for long thin lamination strips.
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
It is a cool idea, the real question one has to ask does it improve my quality and speed of work. For me?.... Not likely, I have an edge sander so, not a benefit for me. However, for others....Maybe
 

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