Non-obvious Home Water Leaks

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Here's the history:

Average daily use for 11 months; about 125 gal.

Average daily use for February, 2010; about 425 gal. :evil:

An obvious leak and a closed system test showed that it was between the meter box and the shut-off valve inside the home. However, there were no signs of water pooling or bubbling up through the ground. The plumbers couldn't find it so we're like...:dontknow:

Here's a nifty solution, but at $300 a pop it hurts.

http://www.americanleakdetection.com/residential-service.php?fran_id=85

They pressurize the line with argon/helium gas and then electronically "listen" for the gurgling sound as the gas exits the leaking point. Much like blowing through a soda straw into a glass of water and what do you hear...burble, burble, burble, etc. Our kids do this all of the time in restaurants!

Simple, but effective. The leak is fixed, but my checkbook is now broken. :confused_
 

Ray Martin

New User
Ray
Jeff,

So, what's the rest of the story? Where did all that water go if it was inside the house and there was no signs of pooling anywhere...? :icon_scra:icon_scra:icon_scra
 

woodworker2000

Christopher
Corporate Member
Just a thought but you may try contacting your local water utility and asking for some relief on the excess usage since it resulted from a leak (I'm assuming you have a plumber's report indicating such). Some utilities give relief in these instances but may limit it to the sewer portion only.
 

nelsone

New User
Ed
Just a thought but you may try contacting your local water utility and asking for some relief on the excess usage since it resulted from a leak (I'm assuming you have a plumber's report indicating such). Some utilities give relief in these instances but may limit it to the sewer portion only.
It's worth a try, but it is usually the homeowner's responsibility once it passes the meter.
 

LeftyTom

Tom
Corporate Member
WOuldn't a keg and inviting some guys over for a digging party be more cost effective? :widea:
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
WOuldn't a keg and inviting some guys over for a digging party be more cost effective? :widea:
That's a good thought, but I don't know how much beer you folks drink. Personally, I like imported keg beer if you're going to do it, but...$. I'd be happy to do the $.

Thanks for the offers.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Jeff,

So, what's the rest of the story? Where did all that water go if it was inside the house and there was no signs of pooling anywhere...? :icon_scra:icon_scra:icon_scra
Sorry, I didn't make it clear.

The water was outside of the house; between the roadside water meter and the house shut-off valve inside of the home. The line is about 2'-3' deep along grade so most leaks will be undetected at the surface unless it's a Yellowstone geyser.

Turns out that a brass coupling had cracked. Strange to me, but it may have been weak or stressed to begin with. It sure didn't freeze at 2-3' below ground level.







Aqua, NC needs copies of my last bill showing consumption and copies of the bill from the plumbing company to verify that it was a leak. I think we'll get some compensation from them. :icon_cheers
 

Trent Mason

New User
Trent Mason
Glad to hear that you may be getting some $$$ back from the water company Jeff. Your water shutoff is inside the house? Most of them that I've seen are out in the front yard. :eusa_thin Just be glad the leak was outside and not inside. :swoon:
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Glad to hear that you may be getting some $$$ back from the water company Jeff. Your water shutoff is inside the house? Most of them that I've seen are out in the front yard. :eusa_thin Just be glad the leak was outside and not inside. :swoon:
Trent,

Yes, the shutoff is inside the foundation walls and inside the home. Codes could have been different 21 years ago, but its location as far as potential leaking/flooding is not problematic with our layout.
 

welldigger

New User
Scott
I hate brass female fittings.( Or any female fitting for that matter). The fitting split because it was too thin and overtightened. I have replaced numerous brass tank tees and valves that have split several years after the were installed. If I were to fix the problem I would use a heavy brass coupling and male adapters on each side.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
How much water pressure does the city have at your house? Do they require or recommend a pressure reducer for older homes? It may be worth looking into. The next time, it may be inside. :eusa_doh:
 

woodworker2000

Christopher
Corporate Member
It's worth a try, but it is usually the homeowner's responsibility once it passes the meter.
I agree but my understanding (from a neighbor's experience) is that the water utility will work with the homeowner if usage is excessive as a result of a water leak (as is the case here).
 

MrAudio815

New User
Matthew
Wow that is crazy, the stress crack that is.

Glad to hear that it is fixed and not in the house messing things up. That would have really hurt the pocket book~!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top