New Yankee Workshop DOA

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jimwill48

Moderator
James
:eek: Just announced by Wood Magazine on Facebook that the New Yankee Workshop has been canceled or is no longer going to produce new shows. Norm will stay with This Old House.

:no:
James

WOOD Magazine
Breaking News: After twenty-one successful seasons on PBS, The New Yankee Workshop will not be producing new episodes. Host Norm Abram will continue his work on the PBS series This Old House. "We've had a great run, built challenging proje...cts, met wonderful woodworkers, and received loyal support from millions of viewers," states Norm Abram, host of the show. More details to follow.
 

nelsone

New User
Ed
I'd heard rumors to that effect. Sorry to see the show go. I hope someone will step in to fill the void!
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Norm was a carpenter who learned to make knockoff furniture on air. He took well designed, well made furniture and made poorly designed, poorly built copies from them. I never liked his show and often wondered why he was selected to do it when there are so many better qualified craftsmen who are much better presenters. He was a sad case of the wrong guy in the right place at the right time.
 

Ken Massingale

New User
Ken
Norm was a carpenter who learned to make knockoff furniture on air. He took well designed, well made furniture and made poorly designed, poorly built copies from them. I never liked his show and often wondered why he was selected to do it when there are so many better qualified craftsmen who are much better presenters. He was a sad case of the wrong guy in the right place at the right time.
Mike you're probably going to get a lot of flack for your honest opinion, but I really can't disagree with you. I watched NYW way back when Norm used tools us commoners could maybe afford, but I stopped several years ago when he lost his roots, IMO.
 

froglips

New User
Jim Campbell
I hate to see him hang up his shop apron.

I do agree with Mike on some levels. I'd not put Norm in the same category as a Sam Maloof or a James Krenov. But, I'd also not deny my admiration for what he did and how he did it.

I really enjoy watching Norm and the show. I've learned a lot from his years on the air. In many ways, his show is an integral part of what drew me into this fascination with wood.

There is some talk that Norm said he wanted to retire when he turned 60, which he has. So, I hope he is following through with what he wants.

Jim
 

froglips

New User
Jim Campbell
Near as I can tell, season 20 was the last. Or whichever the "Kitchen Makeover" season was.

After that, they re-edited and broadcasted some of their greatest hits as Season 21.

I'm not positive on the season numbers, but I'm too close to bedtime to factcheck myself :)

Jim
 

nelsone

New User
Ed
Norm was definitely no master craftsman, but then again how many of us are? What Norm did do was get a lot of people interested in woodworking and that has helped in the explosion of great woodworking resources that are available to us today. How many options were available for magazines, tools books, classes, etc. 20 years ago???
 

Travis Porter

Travis
Corporate Member
I will miss it. I can't say that I am a fanatic, but I liked to watch the shows just to see some different styles, techniques, and woodworking.

Now, I don't think there is a single woodworking show on TV. So sad.....

I figured it was over last year when they were rerunning past episodes.....
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
Norm, NYW and TOH, and Russell Morasch the creator and producer of both programs, did more to popularize woodworking and home renovation and rejuvenate and expand the ww tool industry and woodworking magazines, than anyone I can think of. I think without them you would have a very limited choice of tools, maybe just Delta and Craftsman for your home shops.

I like to think both Norm and my ww knowledge and skills improved together over the years. At first I learned from his skills. Llater through the knowledge he imparted and curiosity he fostered in me, I recognized that there might be better, or at least different ways to do things than he did them. But that was part of his contribution and my growth as a woodworker. Before you criticize him, you must fully appreciate the intent of the show and the target audience- it was not aimed at FWW snobs or wannabes, nor Williamsburg old world craftsmen. I think there are a lot of folks out there that would not be the woodworkers they are today without some primary or secondary influences of Norm.

From everything I have read, he has remained true to himself and a genuine nice guy. I wish him well.
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
Master craftman or not Norm and NYW helped to get and keep folks interested in WW. I think it is sad in the sense that I doubt another WW show will be put in it's place.
 

CarvedTones

Board of Directors, Vice President
Andy
Norm was a carpenter who learned to make knockoff furniture on air. He took well designed, well made furniture and made poorly designed, poorly built copies from them. I never liked his show and often wondered why he was selected to do it when there are so many better qualified craftsmen who are much better presenters. He was a sad case of the wrong guy in the right place at the right time.
I agree with much of your assessment, but he did enable a whole generation to make stuff that they felt pretty darn good about and that will last another generation or two. He got a lot of people off the couch and into the shop.
 

pcooper

Phillip Cooper
Corporate Member
Yea, he was a carpenter that got into woodworking, and some of his early stuff wasn't the best in the world, but neither was mine. I've still got all my projects from early on, and he fit my ability to a "T". I learned all kinds of things from him, and also learned some things that don't work. I think if you watch all his shows from early on to late, you'd see a progression in knowledge on his part too. He wasn't an expert, and he'd tell you that. Thing is this, where is there a show that fits the bill of an expert...and on PBS or any other general "everybody with normal TV" can see? I hate to see him go, but understand why. Hey, for me there's always reruns!!!!:icon_thum
 

cliff56

cliff
Corporate Member
i agree with some of the statements in these post, most importantly norm has got lot of people interested in woodworking that never would have, showed a lot of technoques and ideas. He was not a master craftsman is true but then that is not what he claimed or wanted to be, most of the projects he did could be mage by most people with pretty good tools and average skills. isnt that most of us here anyway? i agree most of us dont have a shop like his or the tools but they were furnished in return foe adverstising. anyway i for one will miss him and apreicate his contributions to the craft i love.
 

Tar Heel

New User
Stuart
For 20+ years and over 2000 shows? I think not.
It was 20 years and 260 shows. Thirteen shows were produced each year. As has been said, the 21st season was, basically, a re-run of some of the earlier shows. I'm fortunate enough to have all of the first 19 years on DVD and will have the 20th season soon. I doubt that there is anyone who has had a greater influence on a greater number of people in a 20 year period than Norm, regardless of what his detractors say.
 
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