Here we go again - round dog holes or square

Status
Not open for further replies.

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Staff member
Corporate Member
So, you have decided to build that workbench - finally...

You have your design picked out and there is one last thing - the dog holes...

In building up the top you can choose to leave the top board "open" and create square dog holes or put it all together and drill them...


WHAT DO YOU DO? and why?
 

BKind2Anmls

New User
Susan
My nickel's worth:

If you are going to make your own holders, stops, etc. I would say square. They are easier to size and add pads and other accouterments to.

If you are going to buy the holders--round dog holes. Round holes are easier to "install," especially if you need to add more later.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Staff member
Corporate Member
My nickel's worth:

If you are going to make your own holders, stops, etc. I would say square. They are easier to size and add pads and other accouterments to.

If you are going to buy the holders--round dog holes. Round holes are easier to "install," especially if you need to add more later.

That is funny - I would have said just the opposite - if I make "homegrown appliances" for the bench - isn't it easier to work with round stock? (metal or wood and add cams or whatever to a rod or dowel?)

I was trying to make the argument (in my head) for square and I kept re-turn-ing to round! :eusa_doh: (does that even classify as a pun?)
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
round for a few reasons. 1 they are easy. 2 you can use hold downs without wallerin the holes out so much. 3 you can make your own on the lathe and leave the top square for clamping irregular shapes and boards with angled ends. ( just glue some sandpaper to one of the flat sides. ):wwink:
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
I use square holes.

1. The 3/4" stock needed for my dogs is plentiful in my scrap bin. No need for dowels or a lathe.
2. I can make use of the squareness to keep things from turning when needed, while still allowing round dogs when rotation is beneficial.
3. 3/4" round accessories (e.g. holdfasts) work in my square holes. The reverse is not even remotely true.
4. Square dog holes were *really* easy to make when I was gluing up my benchtop. I did 45 in under an hour.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
When initially making my bench, I put in a tail vise and square holes down the front edge. Easy to do if gluing up the top (not one solid slab), and they are superb for hand planing. I have since added round ones for hold fasts, bench pups, etc. I would/will probably do the same for any future bench.

Go
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Staff member
Corporate Member
I use square holes.


2. I can make use of the squareness to keep things from turning when needed, while still allowing round dogs when rotation is beneficial.


Now that is a GREAT argument for square bench dog holes!

4. Square dog holes were *really* easy to make when I was gluing up my benchtop. I did 45 in under an hour.

Chris - how did you make 45 in under an hour?
 

Phil S

Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
You could make a bench with both and then you would never be wrong or is that never completely right - sort of like the believing both the theory of general relativity and quantum theory are right - or you could make octagon holes that would be all-purpose but good for nothing
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
4. Square dog holes were *really* easy to make when I was gluing up my benchtop. I did 45 in under an hour.

Chris - how did you make 45 in under an hour?

My top is laminated - picture lots of 2.5" wide boards on their edges, glued together on their faces for a 2.5" thick top. I glued 6 boards in 3 pairs and then used a dado on the table saw to cut slots every 4". Those slots then became the dog holes.

Looking at my album, it looks like I don't have a picture of that part of the build. Best I've got is this one...which shows 2 of the dog rows after I've glued on one more board to transform the slots into holes.

top-glueup2.jpg
 

W Burton

New User
Bill
I am still putting the finishing touches on my new "Big Ash Workbench," and I have put in two rows of . . . rectangular dog holes. I stole the idea from the Benchcrafted plans. Actually, the top part of the dog hole is 15/16" x 1-1/4". It then tapers in to 15/16" x 15/16". The bottom tapers further to allow a thin wooden strip to act as a "spring" to hold the dog in place. I am making a dog for each of the 26 holes, so the top surface will be flat, and the dogs can be popped up from below when needed. Here's a picture of my jig to cut the holes:
bench dog holes 01.jpg


The advantage I saw with this design is that the top of the dog will stay in place and not go below the surface, allowing the bench to basically not have holes.

I have used round holes on my twin screw vise, which line up with the two rows of 13 dog holes spaced 7" apart. I may also incorporate a few round holes for hold-downs should I see the need for them. By using a split top design, I should be able to slip a clamp down in the center slot for holding down most work.

Here's a photo of my progress so far, with dogs made for about half the holes:

IMG_0318.jpg
 

Attachments

  • dog holes Benchcrafted.JPG
    dog holes Benchcrafted.JPG
    21 KB · Views: 634

automobiliben

New User
Ben
Hank,

What type of bench are you building? I just started on a split top Roubo of sorts that I am going to put my Emmert into. Still debating between a shoulder or wagon vise though...

Ben
 

McRabbet

Rob
Corporate Member
I'm a proponent of 3/4" round dog holes since a large number of bench accessories are made for that size (just drool over the Lee Valley stuff) and it is easy to add them after the bench has been completed, unlike square ones. I know that traditional holdfasts (like the Grammercy ones) will fit into square dog holes, they are optimal for 3/4" round holes.

My 2 cents.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Staff member
Corporate Member
You could make a bench with both and then you would never be wrong or is that never completely right - sort of like the believing both the theory of general relativity and quantum theory are right - or you could make octagon holes that would be all-purpose but good for nothing
Thanks? (I think?)
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Staff member
Corporate Member
Hank,

What type of bench are you building? I just started on a split top Roubo of sorts that I am going to put my Emmert into. Still debating between a shoulder or wagon vise though...

Ben
AWW Ben - you don't want to ruin that Roubo with an Emmert - I come down tomorrow and take that off your hands so you can make a completely wooden bench!:rotflm:

Seriously,
I have a bench that my Dad and I made years ago - I am planning to upgrade it - I am still in the planning stages...
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Premier Sponsor

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top