Dupont6480 Workshop started!!

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dupont6480

New User
Tim
Background: Started to modify my 2 stall barn (no footings or slab) into a workshop. Received a lot of great advice recommending otherwise as I would end up with severe moisture and building structure issues in the future. I was advised to consult inspectors, contractors, builders, termite company etc before starting and which I immediately did. . . My property is zoned Agricultural. After considering other options (1) Move into the garage which LOML stated NO (2) building a new building elsewhere on the property. But with child in college and economy; LOML stated NO and could not understand why I could not use the exisiting building.

Well, after consulting a lot of people the LOML and I have decided on the following: Gut the barn and install a concrete floor inside. Then take out back wall and extend the building (after digging footings etc with a monolithic pour) another 16' making my new workshop once complete 16'x32'.

Additionally, at the same time pour a 4x8 slab for a room on the back for the DC and Air and another pour that day for an apron on the front of the building.

This weekend I completed the following: Gut the inside, remove the 2x6 flooring, removed the 2x4 joists and a 4x6 that ran across the building supporting the joists, removed the ceiling OSB, removed siding on back and 3' section of siding on both side and front to allow us to cut old OSB and old 2x4 walls 2' from ground (there are 4x4s every 4' installed in cement that actually support the original barn and the 2x4 walls were supported on jack plate nailed between each 4x4). Once the lower section of the 2x4s are cut; a form will be built that will allow a concrete slab to be poured inside the perimeter of the barn and extend a little outside the walls of the exising barn on the sides. Then we will cripple the cut 2x4s onto new jack plates on the top of the new cement slab.

Prior to the deck being poured on the inside; the footings will be dug and the forms will be built to allow for a monolithic pour for the extended building, DC room, the barn and the apron all the same day.

Other than the material and labor costs of concrete prep (digging, forms built) I have some very talented friends (framers, electricians etc) that have voluteered to assist on the weekends to finish the project.

This week after work I will remove all the nails from the wood I removed this weekend (a lot still in good shape) and prep so the framers and I can brace the building and remove the back wall, cut the OSB and 2x4s around the perimeter with plans for the concrete work to be completed the following week (pending weather, inspector scheduling and Murphy)

I know this has been long winded but I will post more as we progress and I encourage and appreciate your comments, and recommendations. Here are the pictures.

P3180681.JPG

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View of 2 stall barn 16'x16'. Once completed, the workshop will be 16'x32'.

Removal of 2x6 flooring in progress. Once first board was removed, I used a 4x4 as a lever which worked well until it snapped. I then switched to a sign post supplied by a neighbor for the leverage which worked like a champ.



After flooring was removed and getting ready to remove joists. I also removed those 2 4x4s once the demolition was completed. They were also sunk in concrete so I cut them at the cement level with a chainsaw (they basically provided the support for the stalls which were removed earlier)
 
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ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
Re: Dupont6480 Workshop

Wow you have been busy. Making great progress. Keep it going.
 

Sealeveler

Tony
Corporate Member
Re: Dupont6480 Workshop

Looks like you're making good headway.Keep the pics coming so the rest of us can drool.
Tony
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
Re: Dupont6480 Workshop

Scott,
Thanks. The body is sore today and I am looking forward to a lot of input from yourself and others who have built workshops before.
Tim
 

bwat

New User
Bill
Re: Dupont6480 Workshop

Nice plan and location:icon_thum Please share your layout plan (tools, benches, etc.) for a 16x32 floorplan. Maybe I can learn from your approach. Thx.
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
Today while still at work, my neighbor (housing contractor) brought over the concrete company and explained the build plan. They (the concrete company) are suppose to return tomorrow evening to sit down with me and go over the plans and provide an estimate. Tomorrow morning I plan on heading over to the courthouse to meet with the building inspector to make sure I am still on the right path and hopefully prevent any delays after their inspections.

I am still working on the layout and will share when complete (if it is ever complete). Still looking for more input, recommendations, and comments from NCWW members and thanks in advance.:gar-Bi
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Looks like you're off to a great start. :eusa_danc And the nice thing about building in a wide open area like that is there is plenty of room for expansion, expansion, expansion, . . . :gar-La; Just a question: have you planned room for wood storage, both lumber and scraps? As most of us can tell you, they will take up FAR more space than you can imagine at this stage. A lean-to off one outside wall is a good option.

Bill
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
Bill,
Great to hear from you again! I was hoping to benefit from more of your wisdom and lessons learned. I am planning on a storage outside under cover. Right now looking at left hand side of building as you face front. Since I am raising the rafters to gain a 9-10' ceiling I will not have overhead storage. I do have another building 50' away where I stow my tractor and other tools that I can rearrange to gain more valuable space for wood storage if necessary.
Thanks again,
Tim:wsmile:
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
After work, met with the building inspector at the courthouse. We went over my plan and rough drawings and discussed the entire build. Luckily, he agreed with the path I was taking :eusa_danc so I will finalize my plans tonight and head back over tomorrow to the courthouse to get the plans approved and pickup the permits.

When I arrived home, my framer friend was there and we went over our plans and what I can do prior to the weekend. He left me the cut list of all the material for the build (framing material, siding, felt, tyvek, shingles, nails, etc . . . I started removing the nails from all the 2x6s that were the original floor so we can reclaim the wood and will need to remove the rest of the siding from the building. This weekend we will prep the building as necessary for the digging of the footings (remove back wall and brace the building).

I will get some more pictures this weekend. The concrete contractor rescheduled for tomorrow night so hopefully we agree on the estimate and his plans and maybe they will be able to dig the footings this weekend. If that is the case, I will schedule the footing inspection the first of the week and once approved; we will start on the framing for the new building.:eusa_danc:eusa_danc

Please provide any recommendations if you see us going down the wrong path or have a more efficient means of getting from point A to point B.

Thanks, Tim
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
WORKSHOP STATUS/PROGRESS 26 MAR 11

Woke up to chilly morning but we were able to get quite a bit of work done. First, we finished removing the rest of the siding from the original barn (in progress in this pic).

Next finished gutting the inside, braced the building, removed the back wall, cut the OSB off about 24" above ground and did the same with the 2x4s around the building.









We built the forms for the original bldg outside the existing 4x4s which when poured will give me a 4" slab in the original building. After we pour the slab, we intend to cripple the remaining 2x4s (which we cut) with new seasoned 2x4s

Another concrete contractor arrived mid morning and we discussed the pending job. I was able to negotiate a fair price and it turns out a neighbor of mine (who has worked with this contractor before) volunteered to bring his back hoe and bobcat next friday and we will finish the forms and digging for the original section and dig the footings for the rest of the building. We will also build forms for the DC/AC 4x8 room on the back of the building and the 8'x8' apron on the front of the workshop. (I will assist him building a fence on his farm in return)

The next picture you can see the stake in the foreground which is where the back of the finished workshop will be. The finished building will be 16'x36'. (you can see the work completed today described in previous sections)



Today, I traveled to Hampton and met a great cabinet maker who was selling a re-furbished PM model 60 jointer. He had replaced all bearings, motor, gibs, several levers and knobs and had repainted the entire machine. I have looked at several model 60s the last month and this is by far the best. A great deal at $500.00 and now it is mine.:icon_cheers Also picked up a couple of nice Sheffield chisels.​

I still need your input and comments in completing my workshop and look forward to hearing from all of you! :help: THanks and more to come!​
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Wow, that's quite an overhaul of an existing building. The only thing I might suggest at this stage is to run some conduit across the floor before the concrete is poured. Bring it up roughly where you expect to put any major power tools, like a TS or that new jointer (nice score, BTW). That way you can run electricity w/o having extension cords laying on the floor to trip on. In fact, I would put several risers in the floor in various places. If you don't need them, it's easy to cut them off at floor level, then cap them so they aren't a trip hazard.

HTH

Keep the pics coming. Can't wait to follow the progress. :eusa_clap

Bill
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
Bill,
Great idea! Wish I had my final layout completed. I like the idea though about cutting them off if not needed. I had planned for one for the table saw but definitely considering multiple after your input. Any spacing or location recommendations considering the size of the finished shop? 16x36.
Thanks and keep the input coming.
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
WORKSHOP STATUS/PROGRESS 26 MAR 11

Woke up to chilly morning but we were able to get quite a bit of work done. First, we finished removing the rest of the siding from the original barn (in progress in this pic).
wol_error.gif
Click this bar to view the full image.
P3250693.JPG

View image in gallery

Next finished gutting the inside, braced the building, removed the back wall, cut the OSB off about 24" above ground and did the same with the 2x4s around the building.

wol_error.gif
Click this bar to view the full image.
P3260698.JPG


View image in gallery








We built the forms for the original bldg outside the existing 4x4s which when poured will give me a 4" slab in the original building. After we pour the slab, we intend to cripple the remaining 2x4s (which we cut) with new seasoned 2x4s

Another concrete contractor arrived mid morning and we discussed the pending job. I was able to negotiate a fair price and it turns out a neighbor of mine (who has worked with this contractor before) volunteered to bring his back hoe and bobcat next friday and we will finish the forms and digging for the original section and dig the footings for the rest of the building. We will also build forms for the DC/AC 4x8 room on the back of the building and the 8'x8' apron on the front of the workshop. (I will assist him building a fence on his farm in return)

The next picture you can see the stake in the foreground which is where the back of the finished workshop will be. The finished building will be 16'x36'. (you can see the work completed today described in previous sections)
wol_error.gif
Click this bar to view the full image.
P3260701.JPG

View image in gallery



Today, I traveled to Hampton and met a great cabinet maker who was selling a re-furbished PM model 60 jointer. He had replaced all bearings, motor, gibs, several levers and knobs and had repainted the entire machine. I have looked at several model 60s the last month and this is by far the best. A great deal at $500.00 and now it is mine.:icon_cheers Also picked up a couple of nice Sheffield chisels.

I still need your input and comments in completing my workshop and look forward to hearing from all of you! :help: THanks and more to come!​
 

yanmarman2007

New User
Jody
Looking good. It looks like the back of the shop were the stake is, the concrete slab will be below grade (ground level), which will make it difficult to water proof. Are you going to use any block work to backfill against so you can maintain positve drain? Nothing worse than rain water running across your new shop floor.
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
jody,
It does look like that in the picture but in reality the back portion is on high ground and has a great run off. We will be putting in 12" footers with a 4 inch slab. We will double check though with transit etc. Thanks.
Tim
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Any spacing or location recommendations considering the size of the finished shop? 16x36.

Tim, for a 16' wide shop, I would probably come out 8' from either side wall (center of the floor) and space them about every 8' down the middle. Then if you find one is in the way when you get all the equipment in, you can just cut it off flush w/ the floor and put a plug in it. Just make sure the plug will keep moisture out, and can be removed later if need be. W/ concrete it's better to have too many than not enough.

Bill
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
Bill,
Thank for the input. How high should the conduit be out of the floor? How is it supported from floor to height of receptacle?

Also. . . any recommendations on layout? I will have a cabinet tablesaw, 8" jointer, DW735 planer on stand, Delta 21" scroll saw on stand, 14" bandsaw, floor drillpress, and eventually a lathe, oscillating sander, router table (considering insert into tablesaw but have room for separate table), european style workbench, outfeed table for TS, bench mounted sliding compound mitersaw, grinder, sharpening station and cabinets.

I do plan on going on the Grizzly site and using their layout tool, but did not know if some of you had some good layout that shows placement of tools to facilitate an efficient workspace.

Thanks again, Tim
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
Bill,
Thank for the input. How high should the conduit be out of the floor? How is it supported from floor to height of receptacle?

Also. . . any recommendations on layout? I will have a cabinet tablesaw, 8" jointer, DW735 planer on stand, Delta 21" scroll saw on stand, 14" bandsaw, floor drillpress, and eventually a lathe, oscillating sander, router table (considering insert into tablesaw but have room for separate table), european style workbench, outfeed table for TS, bench mounted sliding compound mitersaw, grinder, sharpening station and cabinets.

I do plan on going on the Grizzly site and using their layout tool, but did not know if some of you had some good layout that shows placement of tools to facilitate an efficient workspace.

Thanks again, Tim

I brought my electricity up through the floor, but didn't use a riser or receptacles. I mounted a junction box directly to the floor, w/ the feed wire coming up from below. Then I cut the plug off my power cord from the machines and hard wired it in the junction box, then sealed the box to keep dust out. (See the pic below) This only works if you can leave your machines in place and not have to roll them around each time. If you need to use a riser and receptacle, I'd use metal conduit (for rigidity) and bring it up about 14-16". You may want to check w/ your electrical inspector to see if that meets code.

As for layout, I'd place any tool that requires room for infeed and outfeed of stock (TS, Planer, Jointer) out in the middle of the shop. For tools that generally handle shorter stock (Scroll Saw, Band Saw, Drill Press, Oscillating Spindle Sander, Lathe, etc.) I would place it along the wall. The workbench placement depends on personal preference. Some people like them against a wall, especially if you have a window to provide natural light. I put mine almost in the dead center of the shop because everything I do revolves around it. I'm sure there are a number of others on here who can give you their rationale for placing their tools where they did. There is no right or wrong way: just whatever works for you.

Bill
 

dupont6480

New User
Tim
Bill,
More great advice! Thanks. Hooked my trailer up this afternoon and ventured over to the cabinet shop in Hampton. Spent another couple of hours talking shop with the cabinet maker and then loaded MY PM jointer and returned home. Awesome refurbishment job this gentleman did and I moved the jointer (**** those are heavy) into my garage. Cant wait for the workshop to be done and then this great tool will have a good home.
Take care
Tim
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Staff member
Corporate Member
Looks like you're well under way. A few details about the concrete to consider.
Your concrete contractor should know or have discussed all of these with you:
1. Be sure sub grade is consistent in depth and compacted. I realize you're probably on sand, but even sand must be compacted to a degree to prevent slab failure.
2. Use a vapor barrier under the concrete. 4 mil minimum - 6 mil preferred. It helps retain the moisture in the concrete for proper curing.
3. Use fiber-mesh reinforcement if available. Cost is nominal and much easier than reinforcing wire. It will usually leave a 'hairy' finish to the slab but this will wear off or can be flamed off with a torch if desired. Either product will NOT prevent cracking, but will contain them to a minimum and help avoid vertical displacement. Concrete WILL crack. The key is to induce the crack to occur where it is acceptable such as :
4. Make control joints, either with key way forms or sawing afterwards. Maximum spacing of 20 -24' is recommended for reinforced slabs on grade.
5. Apply curing compound/sealer. This will aid in cleanup as well. If you plan to paint/stain the floor, follow manufacturer's recommendations regarding wait time and proper sealer to use before applying.

Also, while you have the transit, check to see if the original building was built level at the top plate line. Remember, it was once a barn, so it may have been built to 'rustic' tolerances. If not to an unacceptable tolerance, it's easier to repair before you pour.

We'll talk about framing next week after you're walking on that slab. :icon_thum
 
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