Craftsman 22116 Granite Tablesaw

Status
Not open for further replies.

Robert166

robert166
Senior User
Picked this saw up at auction, with tons of acc. at a really good price. I know it is discontinued and parts are rare, but at the price I couldn't pass it up. Anyway the only problem I see with it, is the saw is under powered. Listed as 1 3/4 hp. But that seems very generous. It is 110 volt.

So here is the question, try to upgrade to a larger motor or look at 220 volt, if these things are even possible.

Thoughts?
 

TENdriver

New User
TENdriver
Robert, can’t offer any suggestions on the motor, but I have the Ridgid version of that saw.

The granite top is fine but you need to be mindful of chipping it. The miter groove is a very vulnerable area. I removed the anti-tilt tabs from the bottom of my miter bars. Too easy to lever against that thin area and chip out a chunk of the granite.

Other than that, the granite is a great place to set an ice-cold drink on a hot and humid day!
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
On the plus side is the fact it won't rust after TENdriver puts his very cold drink on the saw.:wwink:
 

gmakra

George
Senior User
Granted that manufactures play games with horse power ratings.
Having said that even with 1 3/4 you should not be under powered.
I have an old Delta Unisaw with a 1 HP motor that I have spun thick dado stacks and ripped 5/4 and thicker white oak all day long without a hick up'
The only times I have ever slowed the blade down is by side loading the blade cutting rough sawn stock.
You just need sharp saw blades.

110 or 220 will give you the same output the only difference is in the wiring to your machine.
Higher voltage means less amps therefore smaller wire and smaller circuit breaker.
1 HP is 746 watts no matter what voltage.
 

Robert166

robert166
Senior User
Brand new Klingspor ripping blade on it. My craftsman contractor TS doesn't run into the problems with wood, but this one does. Perhaps it is the pulley size. I will have to take the side off and get a closer look at the motor. Both 10 inch machines.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
Go with the newer thin kerf blades that will remove less wood per cut and your saw will feel like it has a bigger motor.
Most of those saws seem to have been powered with universal type motors (brush type motors like your drill). Saws with these motors are very noisy too. It's quite unlikely that if your saw is one of these that you will be able to put a larger motor in it. Of course, anything is possible if you want to throw a lot of time and money into it, but not practical otherwise.

Charley
 

Canuck

Wayne
Corporate Member
I have been using earlier version of that saw (22124) that also has the 1 3/4 motor. In the 12 years I have had I never had an issue with it being under powered for my use. I do run thin kerf blades on it as rule. Mine has the cast iron top and Biesemeyer fence.

Wayne
 
Last edited:

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Brand new Klingspor ripping blade on it. My craftsman contractor TS doesn't run into the problems with wood, but this one does. Perhaps it is the pulley size. I will have to take the side off and get a closer look at the motor. Both 10 inch machines.
but at the price I couldn't pass it up. Anyway the only problem I see with it, is the saw is under powered. Listed as 1 3/4 hp.
Maybe the motor should be tested by specialists and rebuilt or replaced. If the price was so good to pass up that's a clue.
 

Robert166

robert166
Senior User
No, it was an estate auction. So owner was deceased, looks like it can be wired for 220. Think that is the way I will try next. Curious if others did the same. I had a dust collector that was 110, changed to 220, it was the best thing I could do for the performance. Maybe this will turn out same way.
 

old-delta

New User
Wes
When I set up my new PM 1-3/4 HP 110V it lagged ripping a dry 2X4. Also it was slow starting compared to 220V. Ran same 2X4 again and it didn't grunt one bit. You will see very noticeable difference in power. Obviously runs cooler.



No, it was an estate auction. So owner was deceased, looks like it can be wired for 220. Think that is the way I will try next. Curious if others did the same. I had a dust collector that was 110, changed to 220, it was the best thing I could do for the performance. Maybe this will turn out same way.
 

ehpoole

Ethan
Corporate Member
I have the Steel City sister to this saw (pre-granite) as is the Rigid and several other brands, all of which were manufactured by Orian in Taiwan IIRC. Although the saw is 1-3/4 HP, I have never really found it to be lacking in power. Although I do normally use thin-kerf blade’s a also tend to use high-tooth count blades (60-84), which more, or less, nulls out the advantage otherwise provided by going thin kerf (that is, versus a lower tooth count 1/8” kerf blade).

If your saw uses the same motor as mine, and it almost certainly does, the motor can be wired for either 120 or 240VAC. Do note, however, that there is no horsepower gain afforded one by converting to 240VAC as it will still be a 1-3/4 HP motor either way. However, if you have 240V service in your shop and you use an extension cord to reach an outlet then it is advantageous to rewire the motor for 240VAC as it will be less affected by voltage drop which means a bit more power actually reaching the motor (and that is the only fractional advantage in power you will see from 240V versus 120V).

But use the saw for awhile before you consider upgrading the motor to anything larger as I think you will find it to be more than adequate for most everything one might want to do and what little you may notice it being under powered for can always be tackled slightly differently to achieve the same end. If you did install a larger motor I would probably go no more than perhaps 2HP unless you have verified that the trunion assembly is more than adequate to handle the added forces incurred by a larger (and heavier) motor — also keeping in mind that it uses only a single belt and pulley to transfer power to the arbor, which may, or may not, be adequate to handle a more powerful motor.
 

RayH

New User
Ray
110 or 220 will give you the same output the only difference is in the wiring to your machine.
Higher voltage means less amps therefore smaller wire and smaller circuit breaker.
1 HP is 746 watts no matter what voltage.
In an earlier life I used to understand watts/amps/volts/resistance/impedance. Not so much any more. But I did have a Delta Hybrid table saw and a Delta dust collector that were purchased new, wired for 120. I rewired them for 240, and using the original equipment wire (just changed the plug) performance improved markedly. Our house had 200 amp service from which I had a 50 amp panel pulled for the shop. Nothing on it but lights, shop a/c, and whatever tool I was running at the time. Much quicker starting on both, and more apparent power on the saw when cutting. Perhaps the OEM cord was sized for 240 and power-limited when used with 120. I don't remember the wire size.

Can't explain it, but 'twas so.

Ray
 

Robert166

robert166
Senior User
Rewired it last night, but..... I should have taken a photograph, but will attempt to explain it. The black wire that goes to the "reset overload" then to the switch terminal appears to have broken at the connection. Or I broke during disassembly. But if I didn't break it, would the saw run with out the black wire connected? I dont know, but someone is going to stop by and check my wiring before any power is sent to the motor. I will see.
 

Robert166

robert166
Senior User
Got it all put back together, run a piece of oak through it. Cut it fine no problems. So the 220 switch was the thing to do.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top