Advice on a chuck

Rushton

Rush
Senior User
Comes down to what you need, what you think you will want in the future, and what flexibility you want to have in your kit. The next tier down chucks will generally have more variability in their build quality and tolerances, and they typically have fewer options in range of jaws available. I don't have any experience with PSI, so I'm limited to the comments from other users available via an internet search.
 

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
Record Power and Nova jaws are interchangeable. Not sure what other manufacturer's may be.
My Vicmarc chuck will use (certain) Grizzly jaws. Probably just depends whom the second tier makers copied when making their own chucks.

Before you go crazy worrying about different jaws ask yourself: What projects do you have in mind for the chuck and what’s your budget? Buying a kit with a whole bunch of jaws may be like buying router bits in sets: some you'll never use.

-Mark
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
For my "Adventure with the $10 lathe" I got the low end from PSI. I think they sell it as the "Utility Chuck". I would skip that step and go to a higher quality out the gate. You are looking at lots of options so I'll throw in another. I've had good luck with Hurricane brand chucks on a couple of lathes at work. The sell a 100 and 125. The 100 is equivalent to a 4" chuck and the 125 is 5". Haven't used a 125 but if it's a scaled up 100 it is a beast. At home I mostly use a Stronghold I picked up here used. Does everything I ask.
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
My Vicmarc chuck will use (certain) Grizzly jaws. Probably just depends whom the second tier makers copied when making their own chucks.

Before you go crazy worrying about different jaws ask yourself: What projects do you have in mind for the chuck and what’s your budget? Buying a kit with a whole bunch of jaws may be like buying router bits in sets: some you'll never use.

-Mark
I have said quite a few times.............."gear your purchase of equipment to what you want to do". But if you want top quality be ready to pay more. There are a multitude of options out there.
 

Rushton

Rush
Senior User
Scott, I just happened to see this chuck: the Nova Precision Midi. It is a Nova chuck in 1" x 8tpi for midi lathes and has standard fitting for all Nova jaws. See price at Home Depot:
 

bowman

Board of Directors, Events Director
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Scott, I just happened to see this chuck: the Nova Precision Midi. It is a Nova chuck in 1" x 8tpi for midi lathes and has standard fitting for all Nova jaws. See price at Home Depot:
Currently out of stock
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Scott, I just happened to see this chuck: the Nova Precision Midi. It is a Nova chuck in 1" x 8tpi for midi lathes and has standard fitting for all Nova jaws. See price at Home Depot:
That's an attractive price, but there's a 'gotcha' detail. The description says the following:
"The quick two handle operation makes it ideal for fast production turning of smaller pieces."
I'm afraid I'm compelled to call BS on that.
A single key is far faster and more secure. You can hold your work in the chuck with one hand and tighten the chuck with the other. I've got two Tommy bar (two rod) chucks and rarely use either one. One of the 2-rod chucks I have was given to me because the holes for the bars had wallowed so much over time that the bars would slip out. I've got a milling machine so I bored new holes and it works again.

Another thing about the 2-rod tightening chucks is that the rods, even with handles, are round and will roll off in the floor from time to tie. A single key chuck type won't do that.

1    chuck a - 1.jpg
Chuck key for Oneway chucks. I added the wood sleeve to make it easier and faster to grip.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Leaning toward the Nova "kit". $200 not too bad. I wil double check to be sure it is a single key, not tommy bars.

Distracted. Put the new LUX head in my 735 this morning. Almost intuitive. Only thing I really did not like is to roll the belt. I was always taught to never roll a belt, but I did not see any adjustment on the motor. Anyway, it cuts.

Oh, I grabbed one of the cheap HF in-lb torque wrenches. Total garbage. Inconsistent. So torqued the bits by memory calibration. This is only the second HF tool that did not work. Third if you count the jack stands that collapse, but mine didn't before I replaced them. Great to find out after a year working under a car the stands were not safe. First was sandpaper. Bad blue.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
"no pictures, didn't happen"
OK. Here's more pictures.
1    chuck b - 1.jpg
Wallowed out holes from a Tommy bar operated chuck.
I suspect the metal was 'easy-to-machine' soft found on a lot of low grade chucks.

1    chuck b - 2.jpg
Tommy bar operating chuck. These can also be knuckle busters if your hands slip.

1    chuck b - 3.jpg
Single key operating chuck. Easy to install wood and tighten.

1    chuck b - 4.jpg
changing jaws is a time consuming annoyance with a 4mm Allen wrench (aka 5/32")

1    chuck b - 6.jpg
Better with a Bondhus 4mm ball driver tip in an electric drill

1    chuck b - 5.jpg
Quick and easy as long as the torque setting is reasonable. Too tight and the chuck twists in your hands. Obviously, the screws are started by hand.
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
Hey Scott, I have three...I think...or is it four? .....chucks :rolleyes::rolleyes: One of them is the Stronghold, one is a Talon, and one is a PSI Barracuda. Seems to me I'm forgetting one. Anyway, you're welcome to come check them out any time before you buy.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Hey Scott, I have three...I think...or is it four? .....chucks :rolleyes::rolleyes: One of them is the Stronghold, one is a Talon, and one is a PSI Barracuda. Seems to me I'm forgetting one. Anyway, you're welcome to come check them out any time before you buy.
I'll take you up on that. Nothing beats holding one, seeing how smooth the jaws work etc.
Succeeded in a couple simple projects. Still focusing on getting tools ready. Found my drill press table is a little off-level but alas, I don't have a 23mm wrench. Todays project. ( found while drilling deep holes and they drifted on exit just a bit. )
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
To check your drill press table, you can make a simple jig with a coat hanger wire. Bend it with two right angles, which don't have to be exact. Chuck the wire in the drill press and spin by hand over the table. You can easily tell where the high and low spots are. Adjust level accordingly.
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
Posted my fixes to the DP in a new thread. I also ordered a higher quality Palmgren 4 inch vise. My generic one is too sloppy. As I use it for half my jobs probably, figured a $100 vice was worth it over a $20 to have square jaws.
 

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