What chisels/gouges should i acquire?

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
A chuck is nice, but a good one is spendy new. Have you looked at turning using faceplates and waste blocks?

The only 'fundamental' gouge you don't have is a bowl gouge. Arguably maybe a scraper too.

-Mark
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
I recently purchased a lathe and some tools from a member here. The chisels are made by Crown. Ive attached a picture of the set i believe i have, minus the round nose scraper.
The tools are:

No. 230 - 3/4" 19mm Roughing Out Gouge
No. 236 - 3/8" 10 mm Spindle Gouge
No. 245 - 1/4" 6 mm Parting Tool
No. 270 - 1/2" 13mm Skew

My question is, what other tools should I get? Its a 10" lathe so I won't be turning any big bowls but I'm interested in learning/turning anything and everything. Legs, small bowls, cups, etc. Ive made a few thingamabobs to practice using the tools, but not sure which others would come in handy.

From videos I've seen it looks like a 3/4 skew chisel would be a good addition, not sure if rounded or straight.

Also hoping to find someone local that would be willing to share some knowledge.
Most of the folks here do not turn legs. Most of the work is bowls and cups and plates. These are 2 different skill groups. I turn only legs for chairs I build.
I recently purchased a lathe and some tools from a member here. The chisels are made by Crown. Ive attached a picture of the set i believe i have, minus the round nose scraper.
The tools are:

No. 230 - 3/4" 19mm Roughing Out Gouge
No. 236 - 3/8" 10 mm Spindle Gouge
No. 245 - 1/4" 6 mm Parting Tool
No. 270 - 1/2" 13mm Skew

My question is, what other tools should I get? Its a 10" lathe so I won't be turning any big bowls but I'm interested in learning/turning anything and everything. Legs, small bowls, cups, etc. Ive made a few thingamabobs to practice using the tools, but not sure which others would come in handy.

From videos I've seen it looks like a 3/4 skew chisel would be a good addition, not sure if rounded or straight.

Also hoping to find someone local that would be willing to share some knowledge.
If you want to learn to make legs you need a better skew. This is a steep learning curve and you will need lots of practice rolling beads and coves with a smaller spindle gouge.
Address below for examples of turning spindles(legs)
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
That's a good starter set. Probably the most important thing now, as has been said, is getting the cutting edges razor sharp. That will allow much easier tool control to cut the shapes you want to cut. Practice with what you have.

Crosscut and rip cuts require two different type saw blades. Same with turning tools but the terms are a little different. Cutting with the grain (rip) like a table leg and cutting across the grain (crosscut) like a bowl. These aspects are easily studied with Youtube. Steve Jones is good.

Over the years, you'll accumulate more tools as opportunities present themselves.

For best results skew chisels, as Dan points out, need to be of a scale appropriate to the scale of the work. This is true for a lot of lathe tools. With practice over time, you'll find what suits and what doesn't, depending on the project.

Below is the results of years of collecting and using. I think it actually got a little out of hand but there are little fine skews for fine small work and larger skews for bigger work.

1 skew - 1.jpg
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Bob after years of debate I finally went out and bought a skew and ground an arc in the cutting edge. This made the tool different enough to have to go back and "re learn" the way to use the skew.

mand w table 3.jpg


Here you see very bulbous legs under the table. I did these with the curved skew and a spindle gouge that I ground on the the wheel from tool steel.
 

Attachments

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
Cody, get a chuck that uses an insert for your lathe's spindle. That way if you get a different lathe you can exchange inserts and keep the chuck. I have had good luck with Oneway chucks. The Vicmarc chuck I had rusted up pretty badly.

Roy G
 

beloitdavisja

James
Corporate Member
So I'm also looking to get a chuck. I believe the thread is 1x8. Any opinions on what chuck I should get? I'm finding out that between centers is great for learning but all the fun stuff I need a chuck for.
You can get by without a chuck, but it is very nice to have. I have 3 Nova chucks: 1 SuperNova2, and 2 G3’s. The G3 is a great option for the size lathe you have. There’a 2 versions: one is a reversible, but is a direct thread, so if you get a larger lathe, it probably won’t fit without an adapter. The other version takes an insert for the thread size of the lathe and can be changed out, but is not reversible. Reversible is only handy for sanding, and is not necessary, so I’d recommend one with the insert.

There are some combo sets with the G3 that include a variety of jaws and a worm screw. I would recommend that since it saves a bit of money versus buying the chuck and jaws separately.

Why do I have 3 chucks? Well, I got 2 of them for free! But apart from that, it’s nice to have some of them setup with certain jaws and not have to switch. My 2 G3’s are setup with pen drilling jaws, and cole jaws. The supernova is where I usually have my 50mm jaws, and is my main workhorse. Only time I’m changing jaw sets is if I need bigger than 50mm for large stuff.
 

JCAlton

Cody Alton
User
When I'm ready to pull the trigger I'll probably go for the g3. And a bigger skew.

Right now trying to rearrange the shop to find the lathe a home... and all the lumber I picked up off of another member here. But it only takes about 5 minutes to be pouring sweat in the shop right now so its slow going.

Once I get everything situated I plan on learning with what I have for now. I might get real good at turning legs while practicing
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
When I'm ready to pull the trigger I'll probably go for the g3. And a bigger skew.

Right now trying to rearrange the shop to find the lathe a home... and all the lumber I picked up off of another member here. But it only takes about 5 minutes to be pouring sweat in the shop right now so its slow going.

Once I get everything situated I plan on learning with what I have for now. I might get real good at turning legs while practicing
72714466_171896884008920_4141832049537318912_n.jpg

Turning legs: start out with an easy format and take it up slowly. Here you see a seemingly simple pattern but it quickly looses its appeal if you make it too fat. Notice all the legs and stretchers on the wall in the background?

8 Feb download 048.jpg

Here you can see all the curves: beads and coves is all it is but it takes a good while to get confident.

1-7 nov 2017 Unload 002.JPG

I am in the middle of building boat ribs for a long term project to be completed over the next 6 months so turning practice is taking a hit.
Its not all bad I am doing a bunch of steam work in this hot weather and that is unusual for me.
1-steam bends nov 2016 010.JPG
 

JCAlton

Cody Alton
User
A lot of cool examples of turning! I just have to resist the urge to buy a skew and chuck lol.

Really I need to finish the reorg and give the lathe a proper home and build a new bench first or modify mine to better suit my work.
 

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