Water Filter

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Matt Schnurbusch

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Matt
We have been using a water cooler and bottled water for about 5 years. My water cooler has sprung a leak, so I either need to replace it or get a good filtration system.

My wife and I drink a lot of water, and we are both a bit finicky about it's flavor. Garner water, in fact most city water, tastes horrible. Maybe we're crazy, but we think water should taste like water not chlorine or anything else.

So, do you use a filter? Does it remove all the nastiness and horrible flavor of your city water?
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
We use a reverse osmosis system that I have hooked up to a separate faucet at the sink and to the ice maker. It made a huge difference in the taste and is very good at removing the bad stuff.
The only draw back is the system is fairly large - mine is under the house as it would not fit in the sink cabinet, but I think mine has a larger capacity then most homes would need. Mine is an 18 gal/day unit and I think I could have used a much smaller unit. Most systems have a prefilter that has to be changed every 6 months and the main element once a year. The consumable cost per year is about $125 and it takes me about 2 hours to clean and sanitize the system at each change. Hope this helps
 

fergy

New User
Fergy
Matt,

Chances are your water cooler water was only filtered using a sediment filter, and then a large set of GAC filters (granular activated carbon) which are also known as CTO filters (Color, Taste, Odor). That's how almost all bottled water is made. It removes all of the color from the water, as well as the chloramines that are used.

Some of those companies use distillation, and a very few use RO (reverse osmosis) filters. RO filters are more expensive and incur more cost in production due to wasted water. Standard units waste 4 gallons of water for 1 gallon of good water. So, depending on your conservation tendencies, these may not thrill you. You can set up an RO system simply enough if you want.

Sources for information and supplies:
http://www.airwaterice.com/

I personally use better water for my aquarium than I drink, however. In fact, I just got rid of my 100GPD 7-stage RO systems.
 

JackLeg

Reggie
Corporate Member
If you are on a municipal system, a good carbon based .5 micron filter will do the job nicely. RO is OK, but not needed on most municipal systems. Chlorine and chloramines are the big offenders in "city water" and a good quality under sink filter will remove both if you have them in your water.

I'd definitely go with an under sink model if possible.

DON'T :eusa_nauglet anyone hit you up for an ridiculously expensive filter.
:nah:

Call or PM me if you have questions. I sold commercial water filtration for 30 years. Happy to help if possible. Might even have something in the garage stock you can use.
:wsmile:
 

Travis Porter

Travis
Corporate Member
I am on well water. I have a filter, one of the standard type whole house filters, and on well water it is a definite necessity. I have to change it about once a month as it gets full of stuff.

Along with that, we have a water softener. Our water is very hard, and you can literally feel the difference in the water when it is working and when it is not.

My suggestion is to test your water to see what it has and then you can know how to treat it.
 

Sandy Rose

New User
Sandy
We have a built in filter in our refrigerator and it does a pretty good job. It's not as good as a cooler/bottle service, but it's a heck of a lot better than straight from the tap. I wouldn't see why an undersink kit from one of the hardware stores wouldn't work just fine.
 

sapwood

New User
Roger
We have well water and it has all sorts of stuff in it . . . minerals, calcium, lime, etc. Purchased a Brita "pitcher" filter for my wife as she drinks water all day! She uses it for drinking water and ice cubes and loves it. The filters aren't cheap (3 for $13) but one will easily last two months. We like it so much we are considering an under the sink or whole house system.

Roger
 

Matt Schnurbusch

New User
Matt
Thanks everyone. We will probably end up going with another cooler set up. It's awful nice to be able to get COLD water on demand. "Cold" tap water in the summer is tepid at best.

Again thanks for all of the replies.
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Reggie, correct me if I'm wrong, but won't a reverse osmosis filter remove all of the minerals from the water?

Many years ago I was taught that having minerals in your water was usually healthy for your body, and that something like an activated charcoal filter was best for removing chlorine, etc yet leave the good minerals behind.
 

JackLeg

Reggie
Corporate Member
Reggie, correct me if I'm wrong, but won't a reverse osmosis filter remove all of the minerals from the water?

Many years ago I was taught that having minerals in your water was usually healthy for your body, and that something like an activated charcoal filter was best for removing chlorine, etc yet leave the good minerals behind.
Yep, RO systems will remove practically all the minerals from the influent water. That's why Starbucks, Krispy Kreme, McDonald's and others blend some minerals back into the product water.

If you are on a municipal water system, (ie chlorinated and treated) then a regular carbon based filter should be adequate in most cases. Chlorine oxidizes iron and sulfur, that's why we don't experience problems with them in most "city" water systems. Chloramines, (combined ammonia and chlorine) are harder to remove, but good GAC filters will do the job. They will also take care of THM's etc, if present.

Minerals are what gives water it's "sweet" taste. The absence of minerals are why distilled water tastes "flat."

 

fergy

New User
Fergy
Plus, there's that whole flouride debate...which I believe the GAC filters remove as well as the chloramines.
 

JackLeg

Reggie
Corporate Member
Plus, there's that whole flouride debate...which I believe the GAC filters remove as well as the chloramines.
I don't believe GAC will remove flourides. Only RO, if I'm not mistaken. Kinda like nitrates.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
We have the built in filter system for our frig (Whirlpool with ice and water dispenser), and have a Pur filter on the faucet (the one you can buy at Sam's club. Both do a good job of getting rid of all the chlorine smell, etc. We use the filtered water for all cooking, and drinking. Tastes no different than bottled water. Definitely improves the flavor of the coffee, and also grits (grits seem to intensify any chlorine.) With just the wife and I, the filters last about 4 -6 months on both.

Go
 
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