Tenoning jig?

Liam Crickard

New User
Bill
Hi, new guy here.
There are so many simple and cheap ways to cut tenons without a tenoning jig I'm wondering whether I need or want one. I'm about to start on a couple contemporary arts and crafts style easy chairs, think updated Stickley/Morris. Lots of tenons and I wouldn't mind making the job a little easier. Thoughts?
 

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User
A jig of some sort would generally make it easier to make a bunch of tenons that are all the same and might be safer than other methods. What tool are you going to use to actually do the cutting?
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
With anything new, there is a learning curve. Same goes for tenoning jigs. You can shop build a jig that will meet all your needs, including angle tenons. For the better part of a Ben Franklin, you can buy one.. A good dado set, and a stop will do them on table saw. Tenons can also be cut on the band saw, or router table. It's mainly a "weapon of choice" when it comes to cutting tenons.
 

Liam Crickard

New User
Bill
As to what tool I am going to use I have table saw, router table, band saw and hand tools. I don't have a tenoning jig for the table saw. I'm not really interested in making one since I couldn't come close to the quality of a cast iron machined one. What is the justification in spending the better part of a Franklin or more to cut just the tenon cheeks, when when the same operation can be done with no special tools.
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
What is the justification in spending the better part of a Franklin or more to cut just the tenon cheeks, when when the same operation can be done with no special tools.
I think you just answered your own question. All you need is a sharp saw and chisel. Once you get the hang of it you'll be surprised how fast you can do it by hand..... and without having to monkey with a jig.
 

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User
I'm not really interested in making one since I couldn't come close to the quality of a cast iron machined one.
I doubt that. In fact, I think you could do better than a cast iron one. For example, this one, billed as the Ultimate Table Saw Tenon Jig, is very good and has a number of benefits over a cast iron jig. I got to use it while I was in England last year and I found it every bit as good as the fellow claims. It simple to set up, repeating a setup is easy and it automatically compensates for the saw kerf. He's got another one for the bandsaw, too.

Yes, you can cut tenons with no special tools , too.
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I use a tenon jig when I have numerous tenons to do. I really like the accuracy and ability to fine tune settings with it. I also still use the tale saw and band saw in the process.
 

awldune

Sam
User
I have the Delta jig. It is very tedious to dial in the setting, but if you are making a piece (or especially, multiple pieces) that has a lot of tenons, the jig will let you make all of them exactly the same size.
 

mpholway

Matt
Corporate Member
I use my tenoning jig all of the time, especially when making any arts and crafts furniture. It is a real time saver and does ensure consistency.
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
crosscut your tenons (length) on your tablesaw on all 4 sides, remove the waste on your bandsaw, set your depth with the fence on both machines
 

Liam Crickard

New User
Bill
I use my tenoning jig all of the time, especially when making any arts and crafts furniture. It is a real time saver and does ensure consistency.
If you were making a long tenon, say 4 or 5 inches, would you flip the stock or cut one side of the cheeks and then reset the jig for the other sides. I'm wondering about the stock being square to the track and the tenon being square to the stock.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
If you can find one, the old USA-made Delta 1172 tenoning jig is hard to beat. It is much more beefy than the current crop of new tenoning jigs. The depth is limited to the maximum height of the cutter you will be using. A 10" blade will trim the cheeks of a 3"± tenon.

1 1172 - 1.jpg
 

BKHam

Bradley
User
i use my tenoning jig for my delta TS all the time. i use it for centering tenons and even more helpful is when you use spacers. the spacers are also especially helpful for cutting tenons with angled shoulders. i'm not sure if a homemade jig would be as beefy as the metal one delta made.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
I've used them, but I think I get better results with a dado blade and miter gauge or sled.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I use a simple home made jig with a quick clamp attached. It rides the rip fence. Has a handle traced from a hand saw. Works fine but takes up significant space. I may get rid of it now that I have a domino.
 

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