Squaring dilemma - Jointer

kurtwp

Kurt
User
So I was jointing a large block of wood that I glued up from smaller pieces and noticed that the block did not come out square. The dimension of the wood is about 5 7/8 x 5 1/2 x 11. I jointed the two sides that would fit my jointer and each side is flat when placed on the jointer bed. I checked for square and its off. See attached images. I check the fence on the jointer and noticed it not being square to the table. Could the fence not being square to the bed be the issue? I have since squared the fence (Best I can possibly do) and glued up some construction lumber to similar dimensions. Thoughts.

I Will test on the lumber in a bit when it fully dries.

NOTE: I have passed close to 100 bf through the jointer with no squaring issue. Most of the lumber barely reaching 3 inches in height. Think of the majority of lumber being passed along the jointer for cutting boards, crates, and etc.

Type of Jointer is a Jet 6in HH floor model.
jointer1.jpg

jointer2.jpg

jointer3.jpg
 

Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
That looks like a fence problem, to check use a machinist square to set the fence correctly.
But first check the table for flat and clean, then square the fence to the table, adjust your gauge to reflect 90 deg.
This is from my high school wood shop class: To check, get a piece of straight Maple, or harder wood that is straight grain and exactly 2" x 2" or 3' x 3" then run it through to check (set 1/64, 1/32/ .005, etc). If it looks accurate, turn 90 deg and run through on all 4 sides. If all sides are square you should have a square piece minus the cut off e.g. if set to 1/32 then the 2" sq would be 1-15/16 on all sides. If the piece of wood is correct on one cut but not others, then you may by inconsistent in how you run wood through a jointer.
 

wooduser

Lecil
User
When I was first starting to use a jointer, I had the same problem. I checked as you did with a good square and the table and fence were square and flat. The only other thing that it might have been was I was not pushing the lumber tight against the fence on the squaring joint. I hope I am care on the description.

First flatten the board on one edge. Then hold that edge tight to the fence on each squaring cut on the jointer. Maybe that is a better description of what I encountered and did to correct the problem.

Lecil
 

striker

Stephen
Corporate Member
I think previous posters got you on the right track. Just a few quick thoughts.

1) Make sure the blades are seated and set up properly with the out feed table. table and blades should be square to the fence also.
2) make sure your square is square.
3) Mark 1 side of your block as the reference side and only use that side to check your squareness. handling the block its easy to get confused on what side is which to check. (what Skymaster said)
You have an unsquare heavy block now. you need to keep the block tight to the fence on followup passes or you'll just be exacerbating the current condition.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
Another tip I might add is to feed the material through just as you have it pictured. It's easier to keep it against the fence if the acute angle of the lumber is downward and into the corner of the fence and table, as you don't have to worry about keeping it elevated. It will show off the table on the bottom opposite side until it is squared up.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
I doubt that anyone replying to this post would tell you they haven't done the same thing, and the ones that didn't reply were probably just too embarrassed to say so. It's called a 'learning curve' and we're all going through it together every day here.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
I would do it differently. Its not easy to maintain a face against the fence on a chunk of wood like that, plus 5'll get you 10 the fence has some flex.

So, I never rely on my fence being square. On a piece of lumber like this, I would joint a face then plane parallel, square an edge on the table saw, back to planer to parallel other side.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
I doubt that anyone replying to this post would tell you they haven't done the same thing, and the ones that didn't reply were probably just too embarrassed to say so. It's called a 'learning curve' and we're all going through it together every day here.
The only reason I have not committed this particular error is that I do not have a jointer - else I certainly would have! I am low on the learning curve when it comes to jointers.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
Senior User
I'm using a fingerboard on my bandsaw now to keep the bottom of the stock up against the fence while I keep an eye on the upper surface. Wish there was a way to do the same on a jointer...
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
I'm using a fingerboard on my bandsaw now to keep the bottom of the stock up against the fence while I keep an eye on the upper surface. Wish there was a way to do the same on a jointer...
There are some magnetic feather boards on the market. Magswitch is one brand.
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
I keep my left hand on the bottom pushing against the fence and my right pushing thru while keep it against the top.Fence MUST be square, only have enough cutter exposed to cut the width you are cutting. My jointer has european style guard which covers all the cutter not being used for the cut
 

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