So, this happened.

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Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
I am in the process of building a table without help. My wood is cut to rough size and sanded smooth. I needed to build a tapering jig for the tablesaw. Well, I needed to trim the side to be perfect. I only needed to trim a VERY small amount. I put the finished jig on the table saw and BOOM! I missed it by a tiny amount and touched the hing. The blade was installed less than a week ago. Purchased a new tapering jig and a brake.
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Costly lesson, one I will not soon forget. Next week I will begin again.
 

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Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
You shouldn't be using that metal taper jig. I'd be happy to make a wood one for you.



Probably should publish plans for my taper jig and the vacuum taper jig.
Anybody interested?
 

riggsp

Phil
Corporate Member
Mike is right...metal doesn’t have to touch the blade on a Sawstop saw, it only has to be close enough to be sensed (about 3/32”)...I would take him up on his offer or make a wooden jig.
 

KenOfCary

Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I had a similar (costly) mistake with my SawStop that engaged the brake when I let some metal barely brush the blade. Lesson learned - but I'm not disappointed in that the other kind of lesson - where you lose fingers by not having the technology is much more traumatic.

Rather have a few false discharges than have it not happen when truly needed.

I personally know an individual that lost three fingers in a table saw accident and after a year of rehabilitation is still reluctant to use his TS again. His fingers were re-attached but are not as functional as originally.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Would Berta have had a better outcome if her stock was a little wider and/or thicker so that the jig wasn't so dangerously close to the blade to be sensed and POW! ?????


I've never used a tapering jig but like Mike's kind suggestion to post his plans.

Tom McLaughlin is the new host on "Rough Cut" and this one looks pretty simple to make but I have no immediate need to taper anything.
 

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MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
you shouldn't be using that metal taper jig. I'd be happy to make a wood one for you.



Probably should publish plans for my taper jig and the vacuum taper jig.
Anybody interested?

yes!!!
 
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Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
You shouldn't be using that metal taper jig. I'd be happy to make a wood one for you.



Probably should publish plans for my taper jig and the vacuum taper jig.
Anybody interested?
Yes, please do!
I have one - but I usually like your designs / adapted designs best!
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Get, or make a wooden tapering jig. Today, I spent four hours finding table saw, and another hour modifying my drop off sled to become a taper jig for one cut. The cut was in a 36" long redwood 2 X 4 that cost us $25. Definitely did a test cut in a common 2 X 4 first. Talk to Dynamic Saw, as blade might be fixed.
 

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
I had a similar event , but mine was with the I-Box jig. It was a stupid mistake on my part, but like Ken I wasn't disappointed. The technology works, what was a metal frame could have been me.
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
So glad you weren't injured Berta, at least you know your Saw Stop is doing it's job. I made a taper jig a long while back that is all wood except for a hinge and a locking bolt. It does the job, but I'd interested in seeing other designs as I just cobbled mine together from immediate need.
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
One of woodworking's most basic jigs, is the taper jig. And this type also allows one to remove wane or bark quickly and easily.
The first is the Universal Jig used to taper smaller pieces. Note that all my jigs use a miter slot for registration; I get the same alignment every time without
the risk of cutting into the jig if I would have to rely upon the fence being in the exact same spot every time I use the jig(s).

If you were to look up the Universal Jig, you'd find a simple method of placing the miter slot runner so that it works in both slots.

Taper_Jig_Function_005.jpg



This example is just about as basic as possible. The first one I made about 50 years ago, just had slots to capture the heads of machine screws. I don't think T-track was available at the time. There are clamps that utilize the T-track on the fence. Mark the saw blade entry/exit points and match those to the edge of the jig, snug up the fence and cut away.



Taper_Jig1.JPG


And here's a B-day gift from Rockler that I also like. Notice that Rockler also uses a miter slot instead of the fence.


Dubby_Taper_Jig.JPG

 

FlyingRon

Board of Directors, Webmaster
Ron
Staff member
Corporate Member
Ah, yes, the amazing disappearing saw blade.

I was making a quick cut in a piece of plywood one day. I had just finished the cut and the blade disappeared. It took me a second to realize what had happened. I once was cutting on a cutoff saw with an abrasive wheel that shattered while I was using it (the amazing disappearing saw blade), I thought this had happened. Then I realized that was impossible with my freud metal blade. I immediately looked at my hands but neither was anywhere near the blade. I spoke to the SawStop guys and they suspected a piece of something conductive (a staple I had missed or something) passed between the blade and the aluminum block. The older brake assemblies didn't have the strip of tape the new ones have to prevent such false firing.

Anyway, I have a trophy like Berta's hanging on the wall next to the saw to remind me of what could happen.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Berta for all the time you will spend making a jig and storing it for a "once in a while"tool, cut outside the line on the bandsaw and trim to exact fit with your hand plane. Safe and it works. Glad you didn't get hurt.
 

W Burton

New User
Bill
You shouldn't be using that metal taper jig. I'd be happy to make a wood one for you.



Probably should publish plans for my taper jig and the vacuum taper jig.
Anybody interested?


Interested in plans for the taper jig, Mike. I have made a couple for specific size pieces but an adjustable one would be great.
 

TENdriver

New User
TENdriver
Berta, Glad to hear there was no injury.

My taper jig is nothing to look at but I did stay with wood. I generally end up using the hand plane to refine the cuts anyway, so a band saw is a very viable option.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
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Getting started on Berta’s taper jig. Decided to make bent laminated hold-downs. Bolts are duel purpose, wingnuts at bottom hold fence and another set will be over the hold-downs. Trying to keep any metal well away from the blade.
 

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Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
Thanks Mike, I know my blade can smell when metal is near!
 
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FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
I use virtually them same design as the others but with a twist. I made mine to run on the fence and did a wrap around the blade. this keeps from fingers slipping under the leg. DAMHIKT.
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