Scrubbed Pine????

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Larry Rose

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Larry Rose
LOML went to an antique store over in Wilson that had all scrubbed pine furniture from Europe mostly. She now wants a kitchen table like them. From her account I've got to make one because ther isn't enough money in Hertford Co. to buy one. I've got some old pine to build it with but what the heck is a scrubbed pine finish? The way she describes it, there is no finish just wax. Does any one know how its done?
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I think you better head over to that antique store in Wilson and see for yourself what she wants.

Otherwise, you'll never match it and she won't be happy.
 

Glennbear

Moderator
Glenn
I have never heard of that finish but agree with Mike that a road trip would be best. I have heard of SCRUB PINE trees which are dwarfish pines growing in poor soil conditions such as the pine barrens in NJ. :wsmile:
 

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Norm did something along this topic with some dark wax on some reclamed Pine boards.
I got some and tried it. It collects in the corners and cracks/divots. Makes stuff look old and dirty.
 

mshel

New User
Michael Shelley
Larry,

Did she say specifically what antique shop it was in? I would venture a guess that what she saw is more than likely something made out of white pine which has been stripped of it's finish and then just waxed. Let me know and I can check it out for you.


Mike
 

Larry Rose

New User
Larry Rose
Larry,

Did she say specifically what antique shop it was in? I would venture a guess that what she saw is more than likely something made out of white pine which has been stripped of it's finish and then just waxed. Let me know and I can check it out for you.


Mike
Mike, She doesn't remember the name but it was on 301 S (that really narrows it down:gar-La;). Your desc. sounds like what I'm looking for except I'll be using old yellow pine. Thanks
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
These tables are pretty neat if your tastes prefer an old, beat up piece that mimics years of age and everyday use in the kitchen.

Christies auction house in London sold this 1860s version for about $540. Click on the "enlarge image" and you can zoom around a bit to check it out. Scrubbed pine and red-stained. A drawer at each end instead of on the side aprons.

http://www.christies.com/LotFinder/lot_details.aspx?intObjectID=5313251

A Vermont version of a similar table. Did they use white milk paint for this? It'd seem to fit the period for this type of table. I'm intrigued by the "company boards" that seemingly attach to the table ends. How would the support mechanism have been constructed? It looks like the supports slide under the table top breadboard ends at each end when not being used. No sagging or would your plate have slid off onto your lap? :icon_scra

Pic 2 & 3- Company Boards

http://www.hawleysfinewoodworking.com/page0264.htm

Was this design a precursor to what we now know as an extension table with leaves in the center section? :help:
 

Charles Neil

New User
charles
yep know the finish its basically white pine that has been 'scrubbed" , like it says, what i have done is scrubb it with a 50 /50 solution of clorox and water, then wipe it down with some water nad baking soada to kill the bleach, ( table spoon full to a cup) , let it dry,. then scuff sand it with some 320 , and give it a coat of wax... you can use a colored wax as stated to give it a more antique look, you can also use TSP to scrub it, but the bleach lightens it some, and swells the grain a little more, ( desirable), but it makes for a poor finish, just wax, so i usually use a good oil, like Arm r seal which is a urethane, and pretty clear, apply a couple coats of satin, let it dry then scuff sand it with some 500 or 600, to remove all sheen and give it a coat of wax, it will give you the same look but also some protection, other wise anything will stain it you can use yellow pine as well, which is more durable, and NC has a ton of :) , but the scrubbed pine is a scandanavion ( sp) ,thing, people love the stuff... be sure to neutrilize the bleach.. and scrubb it out side, and use protection, using a 00 steel wool pad helps alot... did a whole kitchen this way...
 

Larry Rose

New User
Larry Rose
yep know the finish its basically white pine that has been 'scrubbed" , like it says, what i have done is scrubb it with a 50 /50 solution of clorox and water, then wipe it down with some water nad baking soada to kill the bleach, ( table spoon full to a cup) , let it dry,. then scuff sand it with some 320 , and give it a coat of wax... you can use a colored wax as stated to give it a more antique look, you can also use TSP to scrub it, but the bleach lightens it some, and swells the grain a little more, ( desirable), but it makes for a poor finish, just wax, so i usually use a good oil, like Arm r seal which is a urethane, and pretty clear, apply a couple coats of satin, let it dry then scuff sand it with some 500 or 600, to remove all sheen and give it a coat of wax, it will give you the same look but also some protection, other wise anything will stain it you can use yellow pine as well, which is more durable, and NC has a ton of :) , but the scrubbed pine is a scandanavion ( sp) ,thing, people love the stuff... be sure to neutrilize the bleach.. and scrubb it out side, and use protection, using a 00 steel wool pad helps alot... did a whole kitchen this way...
Charles, Did you use the cholox/water solution on newly planed and sanded wood?
 

Charles Neil

New User
charles
didnt do alot of sanding, just enough to flatten and level, went to about 120 , then scrubbed it, it raises the grain and all that, when dry the scuff sand with some 320 or 220, just enough to defuzz it, and let it go, if you want more distressed , take it out and turn it upside down on some gravel and walk on it, the best is a asphalt surface with random gravel on it, you might have to pick a gravel or so out, but it gives a non random pattern and looks good, after the first coat of arm r seal, if you are going that route, a glaze will help "dirty it",and accent the distressing, any oil based dark gel stain will do for a glaze, but only after the first coat of oil, will be glad to walk you thru, pictures help alot ..
tell what else works gret and looks good, is to hand plane it, just us a smoother, not too rough, but some tear out and whatever is just icing on the cake, then give it a quick sand with some 180 or so, just enough to remove any real sharp edges the plane left, so its a quick buzz, then scrubb it, and follow the above.. folks love this stuff, seriously, the older looking and the nastier the better.. and its quick and fun to do, you just cant mess it up ,
 
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