Router Table Fence - Not from a plan

Status
Not open for further replies.

shoeless

New User
Joe
Hi. I am about to build a new router table fence and I'd like to include to bells and whistles that I've seen on some of the manufactured ones...namely a t-slot riding fence and another t-slot on the face to allow for featherboard/stop-block attachments. Here are my questions:

1) As a general rule, how far up on the face of the fence do you place the groove for stop-block/featherboard attachments?
2) On the router table top, how far in do you stop the t-slot for adjusting the fence.

My thoughts were to make the fence 6" high and place the slot 4" up. (I may also add a second vertical to allow the face to have a variable open/close slot depending on the size of the bit I am using.)

To adjust/move the fence, my thought was to place the 2-t-slots starting from the back of the table to the center of the table where the hole for the router would go.

Does that sound reasonable?

Thanks!
 

froglips

New User
Jim Campbell
Sounds like fun!

One thing to consider, which always challenges my mind, is that a router is round. I mention this not only to reinforce my own mental road blocks, but also to offer up some alternatives to the t-tracks in the table.

One end of your fence pivots on a dowl. Then cut a grooved arc at the other end. Various locking options could be fashioned for the groove.

Sort of like a pendulem in a clock.

Another option is to make a fence longer than your table and clamp it at the edges of the table.

Keep us posted on your project!

Jim
 

cpw

Charles
Corporate Member
My thoughts were to make the fence 6" high and place the slot 4" up. (I may also add a second vertical to allow the face to have a variable open/close slot depending on the size of the bit I am using.)
6" sounds a bit tall for most operations, to me. I'm not at home, but I think my fence is around 3" tall and I think the t-slots are probably around 2" up. You might think about if you are going to make your attachments or purchase them, and what kinds of limits purchase attachments might present. I saw a shop made like the attached plan for a High-Low router fence that might work for you.
 

Attachments

DaveO

New User
DaveO
Joe here is my fence. It was done in the style ala Nahm, but without the plans.


I used Incra T-tracks for the fence adjustment mech. (something I would reconsider if making it again, and just clamp it to the table). Mine stop just behind the center of the router collet, but I can push the fence past the bit due to the placement of the adjustment knobs. I would say that you would want your fence to pass the bit a little bit, so how far to set the tracks will be dependent on how you build the fence.
I also used Incra miter track for a miter slot and the leftover piece on the fence for a Benchdog featherboard set up. The bottom of the track is at 5" above the table surface. It has worked well in that location for everything I have done so far. Again I think your placement would depend on the type of featherboard that you are planning to use. It should allow the tips of the FB to come within a 1/2" of the table surface, or possibly all the way down to it.
I also used some more T-track to allow the two wings of the fence to move in and out from the bit adjusting the gap depending on bit diameter.
HTH,
Dave:)
 

shoeless

New User
Joe
I hadn't even considered that as an option, but I've already purchased a t-track kit from Rockler (when they has their two-fer sale. I guess I am committed to that way.

As far as making the fence longer and using clamps, that's the way I've operated for the past 8 years with a piece of 5/4 red oak. That fence has seen better days and its replacement time has come.

As a newbie to this site and seeing all the pictures of other's shops has inspired me to spruce up my own! :-D

Thanks for the advice!

Sounds like fun!

One thing to consider, which always challenges my mind, is that a router is round. I mention this not only to reinforce my own mental road blocks, but also to offer up some alternatives to the t-tracks in the table.

One end of your fence pivots on a dowl. Then cut a grooved arc at the other end. Various locking options could be fashioned for the groove.

Sort of like a pendulem in a clock.

Another option is to make a fence longer than your table and clamp it at the edges of the table.

Keep us posted on your project!

Jim
 

shoeless

New User
Joe
That's another interesting idea. Kill two birds with one stone, er fence, although I envisioned something more along the lines of DaveO's fence below. The more I think of things, I don't think I'll have a need for such a high fence...my panel cutter is horizontal. I may just split the difference and make it 4" with the t-track at 2" and custom make featherboards to fit. Thanks for sharing the plan...my fence may still very well turn out that way.

6" sounds a bit tall for most operations, to me. I'm not at home, but I think my fence is around 3" tall and I think the t-slots are probably around 2" up. You might think about if you are going to make your attachments or purchase them, and what kinds of limits purchase attachments might present. I saw a shop made like the attached plan for a High-Low router fence that might work for you.
 

shoeless

New User
Joe
That actually helped A LOT! Thanks Dave...I at least know what to think about going into this now. Curious to know why you would reconsider using the Incra t-tracks as that was what I am planning to use?
 

DaveO

New User
DaveO
Curious to know why you would reconsider using the Incra t-tracks as that was what I am planning to use?
I would reconsider using the T-track as the fence guides. Not the product itself. I think it is a great product. The T-tracks gather a lot of debris, requiring frequent cleaning out. Also I find that using the hex-head bolts with it don't allow for the smoothest adjustment, and can sometimes jump a bit while tightening them down. This could possibly be over-come by using the appropriate t-track bolts or ground down toilet flange bolts. Basically I found that I did a lot of work recessing those tracks into my top, (not to mention the expense) and I could have got the same results by just clamping the fence to the edges of the table. I was advised by several members against it, but I didn't listen :roll:

Dave:)
 

novice99

New User
Mike
did you say square-headed dolt??

Well then I'm your man!

I won't even tell you about my last bout in the shop :roll::roll::roll::roll:
 

DavidF

New User
David
My original RT before I put it in the TS extension had a pivoting fence and that was perfect! only one end to clamp and could be adjusted with great ease. You could even add a small block to the front with a threaded rod for micro adjustments. I wouldn't bother with a parallel fence, it just isn't necessary on a router table.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top