Replacing a Deadbolt

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patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
We just bought a new-to-us house, and we want to change the doorknobs and deadbolts. The existing hardware is made by Schlage, so we bought updated versions of the same Schlage models. Unfortunately, Schlage has change the design. The hole in the door for the deadbolt was originally 15/16". It's now 1".


How can I accurately enlarge a 15/16" hole to 1"? I sure don't want to destroy the doors learning how to do it. I realize I could make a jig that has a 1" hole (hopefully) in the right position to support a hole saw, but I'm hoping there's a better way.
 

LeftyTom

Tom
Corporate Member
You may have to use sandpaper to enlarge, as it is only 1/16". Maybe a drum sander bit chucked in a drill.
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
I once bought a kit that included a jig for both the through hole ( key ) and the blind hole (bolt).(sorry I don't know the proper terminology)
single jig keeps both holes aligned
Also included both size hole saws. not too costly as I recall.
If you have to do more than one of these it might be worth it.
 

bluedawg76

New User
Sam
1) you can re-key the lock instead -either a locksmith or you can buy a kit to do this. Just follow the instructions and don't the let pins and springs shoot out....BTDT.
2) The alternative would be a router. Use a rabbet bit that will give you a 1/32" enlargement and then follow w/ a flush trim bit
3) mallet
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
1. Wrap sandpaper around a dowel until you get a snug fit and wear it down.

2. I've used a flap sanding wheel, but you need to go slow and test fit frequently. Do a couple of seconds on one side, then same from the other side.

3. Lowe's and Home Depot can re-key, just take them to the store.
 
Last edited:

tri4sale

Daniel
Corporate Member
We just bought a new-to-us house, and we want to change the doorknobs and deadbolts. The existing hardware is made by Schlage, so we bought updated versions of the same Schlage models. Unfortunately, Schlage has change the design. The hole in the door for the deadbolt was originally 15/16". It's now 1".


How can I accurately enlarge a 15/16" hole to 1"? I sure don't want to destroy the doors learning how to do it. I realize I could make a jig that has a 1" hole (hopefully) in the right position to support a hole saw, but I'm hoping there's a better way.
Might be cheaper to return those and rekey. Last rekey job I had was a $60 or $70 trip charge and $13 per lock. If you're doing a lot of locks you might be able to get the price down. If you mess up and have to replace the door then it would definitely be cheaper to rekey :)

PM if you need a locksmith in Cary.
 

redknife

Chris
Corporate Member
If you do go th rekey route, see if there is a local locksmith where you can take the whole assembly. As I recall it was about 50- for them to perform the rekey at the house and 8 to have rekeyed as a walkin in their shop.
 

gazzer

Gazzer
Corporate Member
My usual method for making a bigger hole is to make a plug to fit the existing hole, find the center, and then drill. The plug does not have to be round (i.e. turned on a lathe), it could be square with the diagonals equal to the diameter of the existing hole. Of course, since you only have 1/32" to go, you shouldn't have to spend much time with sandpaper.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff

junquecol

Bruce
User
Using a 1" hole saw in drill press, drill two pieces of plywood that are the same size. Adding a third piece to connect them, spaced to fit around door, with holes lined up over existing hole. Clamp or screw in place, then using hole saw from both sides, drill the door out. Been there, done it several times in my business.
 

FlyingRon

Board of Directors, Webmaster
Ron
Staff member
Corporate Member
I just took my locks to the locksmith's store and they rekeyed (well I just wanted them rekeyed to an existing key while I waited. Less than $20.

The other thing to check if you want to just use the new locks is to leave the "bolt" part of the original lock in place and see if the new cylinder will fit into it and operate it.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
Just buy a 1" twist bit to enlarge the 15/16" hole (you will typically need at least a 1/2" drill chuck). The existing hole should pretty well guide the bit and if you have any issues keeping your drill perpendicular to the door then take a 1.5-2" thick block of wood and chuck your 1" bit in the drill press to create a drill guide. Once you have made the drill guide you can either hold it in place and use it to guide the twist bit or you can align it and clamp it in place and use most any reasonable drill bit to complete and enlarge the hole (e.g. twist bit, hole saw, Forstner bit, etc.).

That said, they also create inexpensive jig kits specifically for drilling the doors for lock kits that you simply clamp to the door and they will guide the (usually included) bit along the correct path in the proper location (the cheap DIY kits typically include plastic jig assemblies versus the metal jigs used in professional sets, but either should get you through a few doors). In many cases such will also work for enlarging existing homes as well. Or you can always use a hole saw to create a router template and the use a pattern bit to enlarge your hole. Point being, there are many ways that will get the job done equally well.

I had to do the same thing to all our exterior doors to accept both deadbolt and knob assemblies when we replaced the antiquated lock hardware after purchasing our previous house in Bradenton, FL back in the mid 90s. It was not terribly difficult and the stakes were probably higher in that case as the old solid core wood doors would have been a real hassle to replace with something matching/identical since they dated back to when the house was built in the late 40s...and I did not have nearly the array of tools or skills to throw at that project as I would today, plus there were no DIY kits back then to draw upon either (this was all over 20 years ago).

So do not fret too much, I am quite certain this task should be well within your abilities, you just need to think things through and go through the motions at me or two so you know what you need to do, then just do it before you psyche yourself out too much. Sometimes we overthink things and start doubting our own abilities, but I have confidence in you!
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I would drill a 1 inch hole in a piece of 3/4 or thicker scrap, brad nail it to the door centered over the existing hole, and then use a forstener bit to enlarge the hole. The scrap piece will get you started and once you are I the door a bit you won't need it.
 

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
Thanks for the suggestions. Let me respond to a couple of them. The hole problem is not in the face of the door - it's in the edge. The turn lock moves the deadbolt into the door frame. The hole in question is the one for the deadbolt. I did call Schlage. They had a great solution. Hire a carpenter. ("Yes, we know it will be expensive.")

Rekeying? The two reasons for changing the doors and locks are, 1) the current ones are old and well worn, and 2) they're brass. We're going with brushed nickel.

The Bosch tool looks like a GREAT idea. I'd love to know whether it's a gimmick or whether it really works. It holds two hole saws at once. The 15/16" hole saw acts as an aligning guide for the 1" hole saw. I may have to give that a try.

There are seven doors that have to be drilled. Schlage said the hole has to be increased by 1/16". It looks like a lot more to me, but I haven't spent a lot of time on it yet.

Edited to Add: I just ordered the Bosch hole stretcher, but I don't think it's going to work since the 15/16" hole saw has to fit inside the 1" hole saw.
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
a 1" paddle bit will do the job. I've done it thousands of times without issue. about a dollar and maybe 3 seconds time. it aint rocket science folks.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
Thanks for the suggestions. Let me respond to a couple of them. The hole problem is not in the face of the door - it's in the edge. The turn lock moves the deadbolt into the door frame. The hole in question is the one for the deadbolt. I did call Schlage. They had a great solution. Hire a carpenter. ("Yes, we know it will be expensive.")

Rekeying? The two reasons for changing the doors and locks are, 1) the current ones are old and well worn, and 2) they're brass. We're going with brushed nickel.

The Bosch tool looks like a GREAT idea. I'd love to know whether it's a gimmick or whether it really works. It holds two hole saws at once. The 15/16" hole saw acts as an aligning guide for the 1" hole saw. I may have to give that a try.

There are seven doors that have to be drilled. Schlage said the hole has to be increased by 1/16". It looks like a lot more to me, but I haven't spent a lot of time on it yet.

Edited to Add: I just ordered the Bosch hole stretcher, but I don't think it's going to work since the 15/16" hole saw has to fit inside the 1" hole saw.
Your concern is well founded, very few 15/16" hole saws will fit inside of a 1" hole saw due to the kerf of the teeth, especially if it is a decent quality hole saw set (as opposed to the cheap and flimsy nested hole saw kits made up of actual curved saw blades where you would actually stand a chance). That said, if one is trying to stack hole saws inside one another to use one hole saw as the others pilot the cheap hole saw sets are often better bets than the better quality kits as most better quality hole saw kits will not stack, save for some specialty kits designed for that express purpose.

That said, I do not understand why you do not simply buy a 1" twist bit provided you have a drill with at least a 1/2" chuck (most will not fit a smaller 3/8" chuck). But if you really want to use a hole saw you can still make a guide from anything from 3/4" to 2" thick lumber (whatever depth is an appropriate guide for the bit you choose to use) that you can clamp or tack onto the door to guide your hole saw without needing the 1/4" pilot bit that normally guides them -- you can then use most any 1" hike saw to enlarge your hole. However, a 1" twist bit should follow the existing 15/16" hole nicely, with or without a guide, making life pretty simple.

If you are really concernd about your ability to keep your hand drill perpendicular to the door during drilling and do not want to use home made drilling guide blocks you can actually purchase a purpose built drill guide designed to facilitate basic "drill press" like operations when using a hand drill. They are not as good as an actual drill press, but they can help to keep your drill lined up for most operations. I have one, but I usually prefer to make purpose made guide blocks from a block of wood for most critical drilling and tapping operations where I absolutely need to be perpendicular to a surface as a simple block of wood with a prepared hole drilled on a drill press works beautifully for most all things when using a hand drill if you need that added accuracy. Still, twist bits usually prefer to follow the path of the existing hole, especially when they are only separated by 1/16" in size.

I promise you are really just over thinking the problem. I have been down your same road before and it really is not a terribly difficult retrofit. That you are drilling out the hole for the bolt and sleeve assembly is of no greater difficulty than if it were the face of the door for the actual deadbolt face and lock cylinder assembly, you are simply drilling into the side of the door rather than the face is all (a hole is a hole is a hole, or something like that :)).
 
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