Loss of power? - Delta Contractor's TS

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Here's the recent journey with my trusted old friend, my first stationary power tool, a 1.5 hp Delta Contractors saw (bought used 23 years ago).

I have used it for everything including ripping 8/4 hardwoods and all kinds of other stuff over the years; never really bogged it down unless I had the wrong blade on it.

Few months back I had the motor completely stop - and thanks to Bruce's (juenquecol) diagnostic help, determined that it was packed full of sawdust. 'We' cleared it out and tada - back to full function.
Since then I have noticed the motor slowing during heavy ripping (even on 2x4s). I am not feeding too fast, if anything I am too slow.
I went to Klingspor's Extravaganza and purchased a new rip blade (24 or 30 tooth, I forget which one I decided to get).

Yesterday - I was able to slow the motor down when ripping a 2x4 (using brand new blade). I finished the rip with slow feed, but what gives? What might be causing this 'lack of power'?

Two other electrical details:
- 10+ years ago I have replaced the switch - electrical engineer friend of mine did the work - installing an industrial mushroom push-to-stop button he had. No problems with that.
- More recently I have replaced the power cord - which get walked upon - with a heavier gauge and slightly longer one. I also now have it in a floor jacket, non-trip thingy to protect me and the cord.

Ideas for me to check? I have some basic understanding of things electrical, but am no expert.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
May still have a bit of dust inside or the capacitor may be going bad. Or the bearings...

Can you disconnect the belt and see if the motor spins freely?

Check the blade while the belt is off to see if the bearings sound odd or offer excess resistance?

Hard to say without hands on inspection.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Thanks Mike. Will check without belt and the bearings as you describe.

Further detail is that it seems to start and come up to speed normally - motor slowing is during 'heavier' cuts.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Bearings could be heating and causing slowdown. Just one possibility.

Stress it till it slows then unplug and feel around for heat.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Is the motor slowing down, or is the belt slipping? Also if the blade has a coating on it, is the blade slipping on the arbor. I have a problem with the red ones on my circular saw slipping, till I added a washer of sand paper between washer and blade.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Is the motor slowing down, or is the belt slipping? Also if the blade has a coating on it, is the blade slipping on the arbor. I have a problem with the red ones on my circular saw slipping, till I added a washer of sand paper between washer and blade.
Motor is slowing
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
(bought used 23 years ago).


It's possible the old girl is just tired out and ready to expel the magic smoke. I would be looking for a new motor. Is this a hang out the back motor or the universal built in model?
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
There are two windings in that motor, a start and a run or main winding. The start winding is switch controlled - the switch that you was not working until you blew out the dust. I suspect the main windings are dead and you are now running on only the start - basically your motor is down to half or less power. Fred is correct, the motor is tired and needs to be replaced
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
(bought used 23 years ago).


It's possible the old girl is just tired out and ready to expel the magic smoke. I would be looking for a new motor. Is this a hang out the back motor or the universal built in model?
Motor is induction 1.5 hp 'hang out the back', maybe dual voltage capable (I forget); it's not a universal.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Henry, if I remember correctly, your motor is dual capacitor. If it is, run capacitor is failing and should be replaced, along with start capacitor. You already have it apart, so why not replace both at the same time.
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
I replaced the capacitor in the motor for a 1950's Craftsman band saw I refurbished for a friend. The connections to the capacitor had corroded and fallen off. I was unable to exactly match the capacitor for physical size, but otherwise it was electrically correct. I had to use the cardboard box it came in to help support it inside the protective housing on the motor. It put that old band saw right back into business like the day it was new. Minor cost to resurrect a piece of welcomed woodworking piece of equipment.
BTW, our resident expert on things of this nature, Ethan, is sure missed when it comes to pointing us in the right direction. GET WELL SOON ETHAN, WE MISS YOU!
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Maybe there's nothing at al wrong with the motor. A 1.5 HP motor on 120 volts sucks up a lot of juice to run properly. It could be that the contacts in the switch have gotten corroded over time and not letting a full flow go to the motor. The plugs can be another constriction area when the wire connections get frayed. There should be 12 gauge wire feeding that motor and switch. Maybe the wall receptacle you're using has loosened screws on the wires and not making good contact.

Often with electrical problems, the cause can be coming from an area you least expect.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Maybe there's nothing at al wrong with the motor. A 1.5 HP motor on 120 volts sucks up a lot of juice to run properly. It could be that the contacts in the switch have gotten corroded over time and not letting a full flow go to the motor. The plugs can be another constriction area when the wire connections get frayed. There should be 12 gauge wire feeding that motor and switch. Maybe the wall receptacle you're using has loosened screws on the wires and not making good contact.

Often with electrical problems, the cause can be coming from an area you least expect.
Thanks Bob. I had forgotten that I had also replaced the wall receptacle about a year ago. Should re-check those connections. Will check switch too. Plug is new with the new power cord.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Thanks Bob. I had forgotten that I had also replaced the wall receptacle about a year ago. Should re-check those connections. Will check switch too. Plug is new with the new power cord.
When you replace receptacle, don't buy those "cheapie $0.69 specials." Instead spring about four bucks for a 20 amp receptacle. They grip the plug tighter than do the 15 amp ones.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Here's the recent journey with my trusted old friend, my first stationary power tool, a 1.5 hp Delta Contractors saw (bought used 23 years ago).

I have used it for everything including ripping 8/4 hardwoods and all kinds of other stuff over the years; never really bogged it down unless I had the wrong blade on it.

Few months back I had the motor completely stop - and thanks to Bruce's (juenquecol) diagnostic help, determined that it was packed full of sawdust. 'We' cleared it out and tada - back to full function.
Since then I have noticed the motor slowing during heavy ripping (even on 2x4s). I am not feeding too fast, if anything I am too slow.
I went to Klingspor's Extravaganza and purchased a new rip blade (24 or 30 tooth, I forget which one I decided to get).

Yesterday - I was able to slow the motor down when ripping a 2x4 (using brand new blade). I finished the rip with slow feed, but what gives? What might be causing this 'lack of power'?

Two other electrical details:
- 10+ years ago I have replaced the switch - electrical engineer friend of mine did the work - installing an industrial mushroom push-to-stop button he had. No problems with that.
- More recently I have replaced the power cord - which get walked upon - with a heavier gauge and slightly longer one. I also now have it in a floor jacket, non-trip thingy to protect me and the cord.

Ideas for me to check? I have some basic understanding of things electrical, but am no expert.
Missed this in original post. Did you buy a "Freud glue line rip" blade, some of which are only designed for 3 /4" stock?
 

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