Looking for input - Miter Saw

ConwayCustoms

Rory
Senior User
Hello all,

Currently, I have a DeWalt 12" miter saw (DWS779) and I was thinking about selling it. Not sure, yet.
It is a great saw, but it takes up too much real estate in my 1-car garage shop.

I was looking at the Metabo HPT 7-1/4" - 10", but I'm not sold on them. I was close to buying the 7-1/4", but after several video reviews, and plenty of forum comments (other sites), I decided to walk away from it.
I was also looking at Makita, Bosch, and the new Kapex.

New Kapex appears to be nice (I've only seen it online), but a little too pricey, for me.
Nothing I like at Bosch. Maybe I missed something?
DeWalt, well, I don't see anything that has forward rails.
Makita, well, I see the 10" LS1019L (corded, which is fine) and the 8-1/2" GSL02M1 (40v only - XGT). I currently have 1 Makita battery powered tool, but it is the "older" LXT (string trimmer - weed whacker). If I go this route, 40v XGT new battery tech, I am ok with that, since I am not fully dedicated to any 1 specific battery platform.

Makita's GSL02M1 (8-1/2"):
  1. Max. Cutting Capacity 2-3/4" x 12-1/4" cutting capacity at 90°
Makita's LS1019L (10"):
  1. Max. Cutting Capacity: 2-13/16" x 12" cutting capacity at 90°

As you can see, the 8.5" is pretty close in cut capacity (material thickness), to the 10", and it is lighter and has a
smaller footprint.

From a few threads\posts, on numerous sites, I've read that some have had issues with the rails & accuracy, on the LS1019L. Not sure about the GSL02M1, but it appears to be a slightly different rail design, so maybe not an issue? I also like the handle setup\position, of the 8.5" over the 10", since it is almost over the blade, similar to Kapex.
Does the handle position, over\near the blade and rails, really matter for accuracy?


Makita 10"
1674232316745.png
1674232449417.png


Makita 8-1/2"
1674232362393.png
1674232412865.png



Kapex REB
1674232500745.png
1674232566424.png



For reference, the Metabo:
1674232738219.png
1674232826121.png
I like their option of battery or corded, but not sure on their fit & finish, quality, accuracy. etc.



If I buy a new miter saw, this is what I would like:
  1. 8-1/2" - 10" range
  2. Forward rails
  3. Prefer corded, but I am 100% open to battery-only
  4. Ease of use
  5. Precision\accuracy
  6. Easy to setup
  7. Dual Bevel sliding compound
  8. Handle directly over the blade and rails, but isn't 100% necessary
  9. Soft start
  10. Shadow line, if no shadow line then Laser
  11. Am I missing 1+ things?

I'd use this for trim work (10% - 20%?) as well as cutting down longer boards (80% - 90%).



Any input is greatly appreciated. Also, questions & comments.


Thank you in advance!
 
Last edited:

bphaynes

Parker
Corporate Member
I have the Makita LS1019L and I like it. It's my first miter saw so I don't have anything to compare it to. I haven't taken the time to fully calibrate it yet so I think it's slightly off, but I've been able to work around that for the most part. The things I like: soft start, front facing rails, bigger cut capacity due to its design than most 10 in saws, laser - although it's not very helpful, not super accurate and definitely not as good as a shadow line.
 

ConwayCustoms

Rory
Senior User
I have the Makita LS1019L and I like it. It's my first miter saw so I don't have anything to compare it to. I haven't taken the time to fully calibrate it yet so I think it's slightly off, but I've been able to work around that for the most part. The things I like: soft start, front facing rails, bigger cut capacity due to its design than most 10 in saws, laser - although it's not very helpful, not super accurate and definitely not as good as a shadow line.
Edited original post to now include #9 & #10.

Thank you.

I forgot about the soft start and laser\shadow line.

The Makita 8-1/2" has soft start AND LED shadow line. The Makita LS1019L has soft start and laser.

From what I can tell, and from the hours of reading up on these 2 miter saws, the soft start is wonderful but the shadow line is "more precise." Never used either, but if the Internet says so.. it must be. :p

Thanks again.
 

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
I have the Makita LS1019L and I like it. It's my first miter saw so I don't have anything to compare it to. I haven't taken the time to fully calibrate it yet so I think it's slightly off, but I've been able to work around that for the most part. The things I like: soft start, front facing rails, bigger cut capacity due to its design than most 10 in saws, laser - although it's not very helpful, not super accurate and definitely not as good as a shadow line.
Rory--check your owner's manual. Most lasers are adjustable. I did this on my big box cheapo Delta, and it eliminated a lot of problems. Just remember that the laser probably lines up with only one side of the blade, not the entire kerf. DAMHIKT.
 

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
I have the Makita LS1019L and I like it. It's my first miter saw so I don't have anything to compare it to. I haven't taken the time to fully calibrate it yet so I think it's slightly off, but I've been able to work around that for the most part. The things I like: soft start, front facing rails, bigger cut capacity due to its design than most 10 in saws, laser - although it's not very helpful, not super accurate and definitely not as good as a shadow line.
Parker--See reply misdirected to Rory
 

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
Rory--Before you give up on your 12" DeWalt, consider building a platform base for it. Saws take up space in two directions--length in parallel with the fence, and depth in parallel with the blade. If your space problem is depth, then yea, the 12" has to go, and it looks like the Makita 8 1/2" is the best replacement. If the space problem is length, build a bench- like platform, and you can use the extended beds for other purposes, almost like narrow workbenches. You could also get fancy and build cabinets above and below to fill up whatever space you have and create more storage. The saw will wind up sitting in a pocket in a woodworker's sideboard.
 

ConwayCustoms

Rory
Senior User
Rory--Before you give up on your 12" DeWalt, consider building a platform base for it. Saws take up space in two directions--length in parallel with the fence, and depth in parallel with the blade. If your space problem is depth, then yea, the 12" has to go, and it looks like the Makita 8 1/2" is the best replacement. If the space problem is length, build a bench- like platform, and you can use the extended beds for other purposes, almost like narrow workbenches. You could also get fancy and build cabinets above and below to fill up whatever space you have and create more storage. The saw will wind up sitting in a pocket in a woodworker's sideboard.
Wiley,

Thank you for reminding me. Unfortunately, and fortunately, I do have a dedicated rolling table that is 6' long and 27" (?) deep. I built a dedicated rolling cart for the miter saw, and was about to enclose most of it for dust control, but after seeing the entire depth of the saw... I decided it might be best to reconsider the entire plan of action. I guess I should have better planned before I started taking on this project. :D

This saw is 41" - 42" deep. WOW!

I'll have to attach a picture of my current messy setup, so you can get a better idea of what I am working with.


Thanks again.
 

ConwayCustoms

Rory
Senior User
Wiley,

As you can see, the miter saw consumes a lot of space and is extremely close to the curtain\car.
 

Attachments

  • PXL_20230120_213018025.MP.jpg
    PXL_20230120_213018025.MP.jpg
    4.5 MB · Views: 39
  • PXL_20230120_213047442.MP.jpg
    PXL_20230120_213047442.MP.jpg
    4.3 MB · Views: 39
  • PXL_20230120_213135120.MP.jpg
    PXL_20230120_213135120.MP.jpg
    4.6 MB · Views: 39

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
Rory--WOW is right. 42" in depth (front to back) is huge. The design of the DeWalt, with the miter angle gauge and lockdown handle sticking out, is not the best. I worked with one for 2 years, and was constantly poking myself in my gut when I leaned over the blade to get the cut precise. Please, no snide comments about my gut from anyone. It would be worth double checking the dimensions of the Makita 8 1/2" saw, but it has to be a smaller footprint.

Here's my out-of-the-box idea: relocate the 12" saw a few inches back, as far as you can and still be certain you won't bump into your wife's car or she won't bump into your guide rods when she parks. At the same time raise the saw base on a pair of 2 x 4 planed down so the saw table is exactly the same height as your assembly table. As long as all the wheels on both the saw and table are lockable, you could get a lot of utility and flexibility in actual use of both.
 

Canuck

Wayne
Corporate Member
Rory

I have had the Makita LS1019L for last couple of years and it has performed extremely well. I rarely use the laser. Soft start is nice and easy to set up for accuracy. I check it about every three months and only had to adjust fence to blade once. Like most miter saws (albeit Festool), dust collection is poor - in my opinion. I use mine primarily for < 8" crosscuts. Anything wider, I head to the tablesaw. I have mine set up on miter station I built for my previous 12" Craftsman non slider. (I did have to shim the base of the Makita to be level with my work surface.)
 

Attachments

  • 7110CE84-D8D6-4E2B-8BCE-8B30305D00BA.jpeg
    7110CE84-D8D6-4E2B-8BCE-8B30305D00BA.jpeg
    2.5 MB · Views: 26
Last edited:

Gotcha6

Dennis
Staff member
Corporate Member
I had my Hitachi 8-1/2" stolen a couple years ago but I would buy another one if I saw it on Craigslist. It was small enough to not break your back getting it in & out of the truck & would cut trim and framing equally well.
Stumbled on a Metabo/Hitachi 10" cordless in Lowe's one day on a 'manager's special'. Haven't used it much but I can tell you what I know:
1. With a 36v battery, you'll definitely need 2 batteries and a charger for continuous use.
2. A 120 volt adapter is available that hooks into the battery port on the saw.
3. I've been using it to cross cut 3/4 c-d plywood blocking pieces in tandem and kerf cut them. For this task it is adequate but I feel it would be under - powered for cutting anything heavier.
4. It's light enough that this 70 year old back doesn't mind getting it in & out of the truck or tool box, and if stored in the 45 degree miter position doesn't take up much space in the "Y" axis.
If trim work is all you do, and you are willing to accept these shortcomings, then consider it. It's not a tool I use every day, but I've found it to be reliable for my needs.
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
I was looking at the latest issue of Fine Woodworking (Tools & Shops) yesterday and there is a comparison of SCMS's. IIRC, the Makita was rated best. Just FYI. Sometimes ratings can be biased based on advertisers. :rolleyes:
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have owned DeWalt, Makita, Hitachi and now the Bosch. If you do not need the reach and extra depth (as you stated earlier) then, I would look at the Bosch, Makita, or Hitachi. They all have pluses and some limitations. The Festool, is a great saw, .... with a greater price. So, unless you really want that saw all the others will provide for 99% of your needs.

The one thing I do like about the Bosch is out of the box the dust collection is decent. What I do not like about the Bosch and others is they use a clamping mechinism that is a fine threaded rod, which is cumbersome.
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
I noticed in the illustrations that both the Makita 8 1/2" and the Metabo have a foot underneath the rotating arm. Does this mean the arm has to be supported all the way at all angles? The other saws don't have this support. I have a Hitachi 8 1/2" that works fine but has the rods out the back.

Roy G
 

Howie

Howie
Senior User
Hello all,

Currently, I have a DeWalt 12" miter saw (DWS779) and I was thinking about selling it. Not sure, yet.
It is a great saw, but it takes up too much real estate in my 1-car garage shop.

I was looking at the Metabo HPT 7-1/4" - 10", but I'm not sold on them. I was close to buying the 7-1/4", but after several video reviews, and plenty of forum comments (other sites), I decided to walk away from it.
I was also looking at Makita, Bosch, and the new Kapex.

New Kapex appears to be nice (I've only seen it online), but a little too pricey, for me.
Nothing I like at Bosch. Maybe I missed something?
DeWalt, well, I don't see anything that has forward rails.
Makita, well, I see the 10" LS1019L (corded, which is fine) and the 8-1/2" GSL02M1 (40v only - XGT). I currently have 1 Makita battery powered tool, but it is the "older" LXT (string trimmer - weed whacker). If I go this route, 40v XGT new battery tech, I am ok with that, since I am not fully dedicated to any 1 specific battery platform.

Makita's GSL02M1 (8-1/2"):
  1. Max. Cutting Capacity 2-3/4" x 12-1/4" cutting capacity at 90°
Makita's LS1019L (10"):
  1. Max. Cutting Capacity: 2-13/16" x 12" cutting capacity at 90°

As you can see, the 8.5" is pretty close in cut capacity (material thickness), to the 10", and it is lighter and has a
smaller footprint.

From a few threads\posts, on numerous sites, I've read that some have had issues with the rails & accuracy, on the LS1019L. Not sure about the GSL02M1, but it appears to be a slightly different rail design, so maybe not an issue? I also like the handle setup\position, of the 8.5" over the 10", since it is almost over the blade, similar to Kapex.
Does the handle position, over\near the blade and rails, really matter for accuracy?


Makita 10"
View attachment 216176 View attachment 216179

Makita 8-1/2"
View attachment 216177 View attachment 216178


Kapex REB
View attachment 216180 View attachment 216181


For reference, the Metabo:
View attachment 216182 View attachment 216183 I like their option of battery or corded, but not sure on their fit & finish, quality, accuracy. etc.



If I buy a new miter saw, this is what I would like:
  1. 8-1/2" - 10" range
  2. Forward rails
  3. Prefer corded, but I am 100% open to battery-only
  4. Ease of use
  5. Precision\accuracy
  6. Easy to setup
  7. Dual Bevel sliding compound
  8. Handle directly over the blade and rails, but isn't 100% necessary
  9. Soft start
  10. Shadow line, if no shadow line then Laser
  11. Am I missing 1+ things?

I'd use this for trim work (10% - 20%?) as well as cutting down longer boards (80% - 90%).



Any input is greatly appreciated. Also, questions & comments.


Thank you in advance!
Might consider cutting drywall behind saw for travel setback.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top