Longworth style chuck

Wally

New User
Wally
Do any of you have and use this type of chuck, as opposed to Cole jaws? If so, how would you rate it? Thanks!
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
Wally, I made one many years ago and found I could never get it tight enough. There may be some method where you could get the blank held securely, but I never could so I put the Longworth away.

Roy G
 

Charlie

Charlie
Corporate Member
After loosing some turnings because of the Longworth, I scrapped it and made extensions for my Cole jaws. Haven't had any problems since.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
I tried to make one a time or two - with varying degrees of success; I believe my imprecision in cutting the arcs was at least one issue. I think the answer to that issues in have the plates made with a CNC; several here were willing to do that for me, I just never followed through.
My turning has declined for varous reasons, in PART due to the fact the I was never able to get a 'decent' 'finish the bottom' solution. Even longworth chucks are universally applicable - as I believe these would only work for a smooth edged bowl, or platter, not likely for a natural edge bowl. I think a for which I think a vacuum chuck would be the most generally applicable.
Commercial Longworth chucks are available, as I recall handling them at some Klingspors show a few years ago. They weren't inexpensive ($85-150 IIRC??? Correction these are $160-280 for the two sizes) for various sizes, and while I thought those were reasonably well made, I chose to spend my $$ elsewhere. I may still purchase some day.

I also had no real success with Cole jaws, but maybe I forget what those were...
 
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Wally

New User
Wally
I was really asking about the commercial ones that are available through the woodworking sites. The ones at Rockler, for instance, have really good reviews.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Commercial Longworth chucks are available, as I recall handling them at some Klingspors show a few years ago. They weren't inexpensive ($85-150 IIRC???) for various sizes, and while I thought those were reasonably well made, I chose to spend my $$ elsewhere. I may still purchase some day.
Correction - I was just at Klingspors. and they are $160 and $280 for the two sizes
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
It's not just wood that's headed for the stratosphere! When I finished high school (class of 1959) my 1st. job was at a hobby shop were I dealt with ho gauge model trains. Those little Athern locomotives we sold for $7.00 are lone gone. They started many kids in model railroading. Now only adults can afford this hobby. I'm frighten that at the present rate of inflation only rich folks can start the hobby of woodworking. Is our shops to become the caves of elderly woodworkers who already have their equipment. That bought it when it was affordable. This is really problematic!

Pop :(
 

William Roscoe

New User
William
I was really asking about the commercial ones that are available through the woodworking sites. The ones at Rockler, for instance, have really good reviews.
I've got the commercial one and it does work, you have to be low RPM and very gentle. I've lost some bowls and I would not recommend it. Jam chuck is the way to go!
 

gritz

Robert
Senior User
I've used Ron Brown's for years. I replaced the rubber grippers with better quality ones. Never had an issue except it is hard to slide to adjust. I do make donuts for bigger bowls that won't fit in it.
 

Wally

New User
Wally
I've used Ron Brown's for years. I replaced the rubber grippers with better quality ones. Never had an issue except it is hard to slide to adjust. I do make donuts for bigger bowls that won't fit in it.
Thanks much for that info.
 

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