Johnson Paste Wax Alternative

JRedding

John
Senior User
My shop is finally built and starting to get everything set up. I came from a dry desert climate and always used Johnson paste wax to keep slick and rust free. Since no longer available, what are people using as an alternative? Thinking about trying Briwax original (no color).

John
 

JRedding

John
Senior User
Thanks Mike - do you use it? I tried some a couple times a few years ago and it seemed to leave the surface a bit “sticky” and not slick. If you’ve had good luck with it, maybe I applied it wrong.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have seen it mentioned here many times. I still have my can of Johnson’s. Hopefully some of the other guys will pipe up.
 

ssmith

Scott
Senior User
Boeshield T-9 works well for preservation as does minwax paste wax. I remove either before using the equipment.

If you’re looking for a surface lubricant that remains during use there may be better options.
 
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HMH

Heath Hendrick
Senior User
I use/ have used the T9 for several years now w/ good results. I spray it on, let it sit for a few minutes until it “tacks up”, and then buff it w/ a microfiber cloth. Leaves a slick surface and has worked well for me.
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
I use Boshield and Minwax. However, I found a hardware sore here that had a couple Johnson's pastewax so I bought them
 

mpeele

michael
User
When I want to slick up a surface, wood or metal I use wax paper. If I want to prevent rust in an unconditioned space I use LPS 3. I have a wad with in reach of all of my machines. I have cans of Johnson's, T9, Bostic Topkote and a can of something else designed for guns. Used them all at least once but wax paper is what I actually use . It's handy and quick. The spray stuff seems to get on the floor and make it slick too. Best way to prevent rust in NC is to condition the space.
 
My shop is finally built and starting to get everything set up. I came from a dry desert climate and always used Johnson paste wax to keep slick and rust free. Since no longer available, what are people using as an alternative? Thinking about trying Briwax original (no color).

John
Minwax makes a one pound can of similar wax that I find at Lowe's or HD. Looks about the same and works just as well.

Find it in the paint department where the other Minwax finishing products are stacked.
 

Howie

Howie
Senior User
My shop is finally built and starting to get everything set up. I came from a dry desert climate and always used Johnson paste wax to keep slick and rust free. Since no longer available, what are people using as an alternative? Thinking about trying Briwax original (no color).

John
Used Trewax years ago a little pricey but good stuff.
 

Reference Handiwork

New User
Ref
Wow, this really sucks. Luckily, I have a couple of cans of Johnson wax in my shop that I'll make last.

I was gifted a can of Bostik GlideCote a couple of years ago and it's pretty fantastic. I find that it protects my cast iron table saw for a very long time without much cleaning and the can seems to go a long way. Even at $30 I would recommend it.


Klingspor's also stocks it.
 

HITCH-

Hitch
User
You can still get Johnsons if you are willing to pay through the nose
 

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junquecol

Bruce
User
Never used Johnson's Paste wax. Always used a shop made remedy, parraffin shaved thin, dissolved in odorless mineral spirits. Using a box grater, shave some parraffin into a container containing odorless mineral spirits. Cover and let it sit over night, then put into a spray bottle. Clean surfaces of existing rust and dirt, spray with solution. Using either a rag or paper towel, wipe surface to spread solution. Let MS evaporate, then buff surface with a clean rag or towel. SLICK!
 

tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
There are a lot of beeswax mixtures as replacements. Each claiming superpowers. I believe JPW was a combination of paraffin, beeswax, mineral spirits and naphtha. Some claim not to yellow the wood as JPW does. Irrelevant on our machines of course. I am trying a few as my can is almost empty.

$59? I have seen it for over $70.

FWIW, on some of my machines, I just rub paraffin on and hit it with a heat gun, then buff. I do not know if it actually opens the pours any, but it seems to last longer than JPW.
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
I have 2 cans, so what I have will likely last me the rest of my life. Amazon has over 2,000 cans in stock, but it looks like they will be building their retirement funds from it. Butchers Wax was the other brand that I have used in the past. I would think that Bowling Alley Wax would be good too, but I have never checked the ingredients to be certain that it DOES NOT CONTAIN any Silicone, which is the main reason to avoid other waxes. Automotive waxes always seem to have Silicone in them, and should be avoided.

Before you buy any wax to use in your woodshop, be certain, by reading the ingredients that there is NO SILICONE in it. Why ? Because Silicone will cause fisheyes in any finish that you try to apply to your project, if it has any silicone spots on it. By then, it's too late to fix easily. Anything containing Silicone was banned from my woodshop 30+ years ago, after a wax spray was used that contained Silicone. It was a nightmare to fix, and I ended up burning a lot of good wood to be sure that I would never try to build anything from it. Silicone is invisible, until you try to put finish over it. Automotive waxes are stored in my garage and over 200' from my woodshop.

Charley
 

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