I've got the Maple Top (2,25 x 28" x 64" - Now what!?

Status
Not open for further replies.

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
I found an old Maple top in Boone (GovDeals Auction). Got it for $150
It had been used in the school Art Department and suffered the misfortune of various slings and arrows.
The bottom surface is 'pristine' in appearance save for the fact that it had been drilled to fasten a support or two over time. It appears to have the original finish.
My intention when purchasing this heavy top was to add a tail-vise or end-vise and such to create my own Sojberg!
Aside from the holes and abuse mentioned, above, there are at least three places on the ends where the lamentations are separating as much as six-inches into the top.
There are no dog holes, of course.

So, there is work to be done.
I haven't the equipment to saw the thing apart at the points where the individual boards are coming apart and I thought to simply leave well enough alone (used the best side for the top) if I could not find local help to properly cut it down, plane the smaller widths and re-laminate the thing.

As I am in no hurry - save one never knows when the grim reaper's coming to collect one (a consideration at my age, of course) - I thought to begin soliciting any experience and expert advice I might before embarking on the task or purchasing vise hardware and such.

In searching old threads I did notice comments relative to how hard Maple is on the tolls used to machine it - so I might not find anyone interesting in putting their nice equipment to work in helping me and may have to rely upon the tools I've acquired to effect any necessary machining.

I hope to be able to add a couple of images - Benchtop 002.jpgBenchtop 003.jpgBenchtop 001.jpgBenchtop 006.jpg
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
28 inches may be a little wide for a workbench, is there a nice clear section with no splits at least 18 to 20 inches wide? If so you can cut of the bad part and leave the good. My lunch the split would be near the center though and in that case I might just try to epoxy it in place with a vacuum to pull the epoxy through the crack.
 

LeftyTom

Tom
Corporate Member
Check with Rick Dinardo at The Moulding Source in Mooresville. He may be able to point you in the right direction.
 

wooduser

Lecil
User
I would take the top to The Hardwood Store of North Carolina. They have the equipment to resurface the top for you, 336-449-9627.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
It's gonna be a workbench top not an altar to be put on display. Sand both faces a little bit with a belt sander to start with for a general cleanup. Side 1 with the paint, dings, and all could be just fine to use as the top or use side 2 because it's "purdier" to start with.

there are at least three places on the ends where the lamentations are separating as much as six-inches into the top.
I wouldn't lament about those laminations for the time being.
 

schnable

Andrew
Senior User
Nice score. This look a lot like a workbench / top I got 25+ years ago from a western electric used furniture sale.

The top is easy enough to flatten with hand planes (really - I've done it). I would suspect that the lamination's might also have threaded steel rod holding them together as well - look for bung holes on the front / read edges (mine did - I removed the steel rods). For the delaminating sections - get your shop vac out and place the nozzle on the bottom of one of the cracks - squirt glue on the top - it will get sucked down. Repeat for all the delaminating areas and then clamp the heck out of it. Once again - that's what I did - works fine.

I've also inset a face vise into the front of mine as well which you can see in this picture:



I also drilled dog and hold-fast holes. I've used the heck out of mine.

Andrew
 

Attachments

Last edited:

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
"28 inches may be a little wide for a workbench"

Hey, as DT would argue, Size Matters ;)

Seriously, I thought the wider the better! Then again, I've made all my benches out of scrap, old doors, re-cycled Ping Pong Table Tops and never had this much maple to play with and envied those Sjobergs at Klingspor. et al
 

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
Nice score.
easy enough to flatten with hand planes
threaded steel rod
get your shop vac squirt glue on the top - it will get sucked
then clamp the heck out of it.
I've also inset a face vise pinterest.com/pin/472103973410482070
Andrew
No steel in my top
I do not have the proper planes nor experience to attempt hand planing to flatten - some dings are 1/8" deep on rough side and there is a bow front to back/high at edges.
Like the sucking glue idea - may go ahead and try that as I can always split it later and run it through a planer and glue it back up.
Like the Vice - why the inset approach?
 

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
It's gonna be a workbench top not an altar I wouldn't lament about those laminations for the time being.
I know, but if I add the vise(s), dog holes/dogs and build the trestle / base I will have a lot invested and should have a flat top to start, no?
 

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
I would take the top to The Hardwood Store of North Carolina. They have the equipment to resurface the top for you, 336-449-9627.
Have not called, but intend to check them out. We have a Klingspor in Hickory that hosts woodworking club(s) and I thought to ask them if I might use their facility to get it flat, Also wanted to work with a fellow there to teach me how to use and sharpen my old planes.
 

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
"The Moulding Source in Mooresville"

Thank you, got it found the number. On the road to #### (good intentions!) ;)
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
I know, but if I add the vise(s), dog holes/dogs and build the trestle / base I will have a lot invested and should have a flat top to start, no?
Yep, it should be "reasonably" flat but be careful about how you define flat and how that'll be determined.
 

schnable

Andrew
Senior User
No steel in my top
I do not have the proper planes nor experience to attempt hand planing to flatten - some dings are 1/8" deep on rough side and there is a bow front to back/high at edges.
Like the sucking glue idea - may go ahead and try that as I can always split it later and run it through a planer and glue it back up.
Like the Vice - why the inset approach?
Making the top flush makes the vise and extension of the table and will support things that overhang the front edge.

Making the back jaw flush with the front makes the entire front edge of the top an extension to the vise jaw and provides a longer gripping surface.

And it looks cool with the contrasting walnut.

Andrew

PS. flat is probably more important than ding free.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top