Is there another method?

Status
Not open for further replies.

lbtripp

New User
Lyell
I had to cut 12 legs with a curve on the outside edge starting 12" off the floor. Legs are 48 " long. Inside edges are all straight. I made a template out of MDF, traced the shape onto the blanks and cut to within a 1/8" of the line on the bandsaw. Then using the template I made a jig to cut the shape on the router table. The problem occured when routing. While routing the first leg feeding it in the normal direction the leg chipped out ruining it. After cutting a new leg I tried feeding it on a climb cut. That method worked only when I made several passes being careful to cut only a small amount on each pass. I routed all 12 legs with success, however this method took a long time.

I was wondering if someone had knowledge of a different/better method?:dontknow:

Lyell
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Lyell:
Using the tools I have, that is exactly the method I would have used. Without a heavy duty shaper to cut the curve using a template, I'm not sure what other methods could be used. I watch this thread to see if anyone else comes up with anything.

Henry W
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Routing pieces flush can be a headache when the grain doesn't want to cooperate. A couple of thoughts: You could use an oscillating spindle sander instead of a router. I'm not sure that's faster though. Another option is to use a hand held router and employ Charles Neil's bump cutting technique:

[YOUTUBE]-l4suyL84-w[/YOUTUBE]

This method provides a fairly safe way to make climb cuts (preventing tearout), and you can probably be a little more aggressive in how much you take off with each pass.

I've also heard of these things called hand tools (they're like battery-operated tools when the battery is dead :rolf:). Perhaps a spokeshave can get you within 1/32 of the layout line, leaving only a little bit to clean up with the router.
 

TOL Woodworks

New User
David
When routing the curve i imagine that half the curve comes out clean and the other half (the half where you are cutting up out of the curve) is where you get the chipout. All you need to do is get a router bit that has a guide bearing on both the top and the bottom of the bit...and then after cutting into the curve, flip the leg over with the template now on the other side of the leg, and then use the other end of the router bit for bearing. This way you'll be cutting down into the curve at both ends. It's difficult to describe this...if you need pictures with explanations then let me know. Hope this helps,

David Nester
Tree of Life Woodworks, LLC
www.tolwoodworks.com
 

2slow

New User
chris
I've always used a spiral bit and a bushing in a hand held router. You just have to adjust the pattern to make up for the bushing. I've never used one but MLCS makes a spiral flush trim bit that may work, however it is costly. I'm sure other company's make them. Never had a tear out problem using a spiral bit.
 

cpowell

New User
Chuck
I've also heard of these things called hand tools (they're like battery-operated tools when the battery is dead :rolf:). A spokeshave can get you within 1/1000 of the layout line, rendering the router useless.
There, Fixed it! :gar-La; :gar-La;

You can install a duplicating guide (pin) on the bandsaw that will let you make duplicate pieces using a template, cutting VERY close to the template size, then clean up with a spokeshave or OSS if you prefer.

I have chunked a few pieces using the router/template approach. I was disappointed to mess up so close to the finished shape.


Chuck
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
I've always used a spiral bit and a bushing in a hand held router. You just have to adjust the pattern to make up for the bushing. I've never used one but MLCS makes a spiral flush trim bit that may work, however it is costly. I'm sure other company's make them. Never had a tear out problem using a spiral bit.
In the same spirit as the above, I've found spiral and shear-cut router bits to be the best solution to chipout/tearout (and splitting) on the router. I have a 1/2" spiral flush-trim bit (as well as 1/2" and 1/4" non-piloted spiral bits). I also have a shear-cut rabbeting set that can also be used as a flush-trim bit when I encounter something really tearout prone. The larger diameter of the rabbeting bit results in a cutter that is more parallel with the cutting plane than a 1/2" bit, this makes the cutting edge much less likely to catch or bite into the workpiece..

I had to solve this issue the hard way awhile back when building a project entirely out of Purpleheart. Normal straight-cutting router bits would just 'catch' the grain of the wood and literally split a perfectly good piece of Purpleheart from end-to-end. I found spiral and shear-cut bits, combined with very shallow cuts (in the case of Purpleheart 1/32" to 1/16" per pass) solved the tearout and splitting issue entirely. I also found it helpful to slow down the router (speed control or variable speed router) so that I could slow down the feed rate (without burning). Combined, I got not only a good and repeatable cut, but I also had considerably more control. All of which made for much safer routing since the pieces I was working with were relatively small to begin with.

You could also have finished the cut with your bandsaw. I've even seen plans for guide-pins the better facilitate template cutting on the bandsaw. As also suggested, there is the spindle sander, some of which even include piloted guides to follow your template.

Personally, I would have used either the router with a spiral or shear-cut bit OR the bandsaw to make all 12 legs. I would then followup with an oscillating spindle sander if necessary to smooth the curves and remove any blade marks or imperfections (particularly if bandsawn).

HTH
 

Splint Eastwood

New User
Matt
I've also heard of these things called hand tools (they're like battery-operated tools when the battery is dead :rolf:). Perhaps a spokeshave can get you within 1/32 of the layout line, leaving only a little bit to clean up with the router.
Hand Tools.....I've heard of these things...didn't know anyone actually used anymore...:rotflm:
Only when MWTCA is in town, however...:wsmile: I go for a visit, to see how it was done....and what they look like:

BACK in THE DAY! :gar-La;

M
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top