domino vs slot mortiser

Status
Not open for further replies.

rhett

New User
rhett
Here is the deal. I have a large number of chairs to make (12) and do not want to cut 240 M&T's the conventional way. I want to make profit, not tenons. I can either convert the G0540 into a slot mortiser (locktite on the jacobson to account for lateral movement) or buy a domino. After cutters for the G0540 and all the festool bells and whistles I come to about a $850 price difference. Both machines will do the same job, and I prefer stationary machinery for precision. Is that an oxymoron since I am talking about a grizzly machine? Anyway the only plus I see to having the domino is the ability to take it to the work instead of vise versa. Is that worth the price difference? Anything to add?
 

ashley_phil

Phil Ashley
Corporate Member
i don't see the go50 holding up very well in the long run. you might get your 50 chairs done but the guids on that clamp table woudl be shot if they last that long.

you could check irs or my auction site for a used slot mortiser or horizontal drill. i have some coming up in MA that will go cheap. the problem will be time and effort to change it over. i'd consider the INVICTA Slot mortiser or rigging yourself something like this up:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIgS_2OKEr0

you could do that for less than the price of the grizzly drill and it would last a lot longer.
 
M

McRabbet

I borrowed a Festool Domino from a fellow woodworker late last summer to cut mortises for rails and stiles in 8 glass-paned cabinet doors and 10 raised panel doors -- it worked like a dream and I estimate that it saved me at least 50% on my labor and setup time for conventional M&T joints. I like to use haunched tenon in my raised panel doors in lieu of cope and stick only as they are much stronger -- I cut conventional cope and stick joints on the door parts and then added the domino mortise/tenons and they worked very well. I wish I had one and if you are in the business of making more down the road, it is an excellent investment.
 

Travis Porter

New User
Travis
I too am a stationary tool man, but since buying my first few Festool tools (sanders and vacuum), I have quickly realized that the quality and precision of their machinery is out of this world.

I agree with Phil, the Grizzly probably will not hold up, and it would be better to consider a slot mortiser as the point of comparison to the Domino. As to which one I would rather have, I would probably have to say the Domino. Floor space and ease of use and set up time are most likely going to be faster with the Domino in the long run compared to the slot mortiser.
 

Nativespec

New User
David
I have the Domino and it is the greatest tool since sliced bread. It saves much time, is easy to use and can be carried to the work.

You might regret the price at first. I doubt you will ever see a used Domino for sale.

David
 

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Festool has a 30 day no questions guarantee. Get one, use it and if you're like me you won't return it. It truly is a great machine and makes joinery simple, precise and strong. You will need to connect it to a vac of some type for it to work. I use a Fein but any shop vac can be adapted. If you were closer you would be welcome to try mine out on a few mortises. 240 would be stretching my generosity:rotflm:
 

Bernhard

Bernhard
User
Rhett,

I'd go for the domino: more versatile. I have a Felder horizontal mortiser, but this machine is better suited for larger jobs (doors, large frames, etc), I imagine that the domino will be much better suited for furniture.
Pity that you are not living here anymore, you are welcome to use my mortiser.
BTW The domino will be my next purchase.
Good luck.

Bernhard
 

rhett

New User
rhett
Thanks for all the input, this site really is an invaluable tool for woodworking. I am going with the domino, after much consideration. My only worry is this will open the door to a series of expensive hand tool purchases.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top