Cutting board

Jak3

Jacob
Senior User
When making a thicker cutting board of hard maple, let’s say 1 1/4” thick, are biscuits okay to have between laminations? I’d like to make one eventually. I know I can glue a panel pretty well but I love biscuits for alignment. Are these okay in a cutting board or will they show over time?
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
As long as you’re not going to re-cut to make end grain it should be fine. I’ve never used them in cutting boards.
 

Jak3

Jacob
Senior User
I wouldn't use them, but do it if you like.
At 1.25 inch it will be a long time before the board wears down for them to show.
As long as you’re not going to re-cut to make end grain it should be fine. I’ve never used them in cutting boards.
Okay, cool. If I ever do get around to making a proper cutting board I might try it but then again it’s probably just an unnecessary step. Ive just heard that they can telegraph.
 

Jak3

Jacob
Senior User
Where did you hear that? I've never heard that, but I don't use biscuits.
In several YouTube videos I have heard that over time if biscuits are placed centered on the edge of glue joint instead of being offset to the bottom side, that they can shrink and it will show a crinkle in the top.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Maybe contact dermatitis (like poison ivy) on the skin from the sawdust, but it's not toxic to humans if ingested. A walnut cutting board or bowls/spoons are even less likely to be a toxic problem for humans
I’ve heard some people can get a reaction from walnut, like any nut allergy. Just sayin’...
 

TBoomz

Ron
User
Have noticed that sweet gum isn't mentioned for cutting boards. If properly sealed, wouldn't the interlocking grain make it ideal for an end-grain board?
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
I have made a number of cuttings boards for people upon request. Titebond 3 never has failed for me. All I do is glue it up nothing else. 1.25" or 1.5" will last forever. Oak is not a good wood for a cutting board, plenty strong, but too porous for me.

I made one that had Robusta wood in that stuff is damn hard and tight grain. Hard to sand and polish by wow nice when done, not sure you can get it in NC,
 

Bill J

New User
Bill
I've made quite a few cutting boards and find that mineral oil is a great finish. While it may not be as durable as tung oil the owner can easily replenish the finish and it is completely non-toxic.
2018-11-27 08.54.58.jpg
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
I mixed up a batch of 2X mineral oil and 1X beeswax (heat gently till the wax melts - transfer to a container) and love the finish it creates - super easy to make and cheap!
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
All the flat vs end grain arguments aside, I just started building cutting boards.

I am working my way from long grain, single color and two alternating colors- equal and varying width maple and walnut, to end grain boards. I have just finished my first two color special pattern endgrain board, which despite machinery issues, came out pretty nice. It was a learning experience. Now I plan to work my way up to more exotic and difficult cutting boards with more than two colors.

However, before I continue, I'm pausing to tweak my drum sander- adjust pressure roller tension, change sanding belt(s), and replace the conveyor belt. I will also change and set the blades on my 20" planer (wish I had a Shelix!). (Yes, for any serious exotic, segmented, endgrain cutting board work, you need both planer and drum sander. A tablesaw with sliding table would be nice too, but I don't have one and don't plan to get one.

This may be my next two color cutting board project:



If you are looking to do this in a big way, you should Google mtmwood cutting boards or go to his homepage: 3d cutting boards Here is a video of what I hope to build next:
The guy is Russian and speaks Russian but his videos have subtitles and are well done. He goes through the entire build process for some really exotic cutting boards. It is a very interesting process. If you get into this, be prepared to put a significant amount of time into careful cutting, planing, and sanding (drum and with ROS hand sanders).
 

Billm0066

Bill
User
I agree but a simple resanding will cure any face grain wear and tear. Love end grain but love face grain design opps too. Walnut may give an allergic reaction and is considered a toxic wood ingested by humans, especially the sawdust.
I make cutting boards for my clients as closing gifts. I offer to refinish their boards at any point, so I make end grain in most cases because its way more durable. Almost all woods “may” give an allergic reaction. Reactions are mild. My wife is allergic to walnuts and has no issues with anything I’ve made or the sawdust.
 

jlwest

Jeff
Corporate Member
I make it in pieces, usually three at a time, and have used rubber bands to stabilize until dry. If done correctly the final assembly can be clamped.
 

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