cutting board sanding

Bill J

New User
Bill
I usually use 400 grit. I also find that you often need to resand. I usually wet my boards to simulate the first use and find that the grain will "pop" on some woods and leave a rough surface. so my process has become sand, one coat of oil, wash, then a second sanding and finish coat.
If you stick to just hard maple this isn't much of an issue.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
For end grain, 120 is sufficient - once you can't see marks stop. If you sand too much on either grain, you inhibit your finish from penetrating into the wood.
 

Keye

Keye
Corporate Member
220 or 320. Wet the board, dry, sand the last one again.
This is the way I finish all the time. I was concerned about over sanding because I have never used the finishes applied to cutting boards. I also use paint thinner, does not raise the grain, to look for blemishes and any glue. Do not think I will use this on a cutting board.
 

SabertoothBunny

SabertoothBunny
User
220 would be the max grit I would sand too. Most woods I would stick to 120 to allow the oils to absord easier as well as the fact that it is a cutting board and designed to be used.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
This is the way I finish all the time.
You don't need to go above 80 or 100 grit for a cutting board. It's going to be used with knives and cleavers so it'll get grooves/slices. In other words it's meant to be used and doesn't need a "fine furniture" sanding job.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top