Building Question: Shop Expansion

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
So I have a 12X24 detached shop that I am CRAMMED in to. I can't go much wider because there is an easement that limits my width. I can probably squeeze out 2 more feet and move up to 14 feet, 16 feet will probably be too much. I can add length at least another 8 - 10 feet. It's a site built wooden shed with a gamble roof. So the question is should I have take out the end wall and extend it? The wall I'd have to extend is where the electrical comes in so I'd have to do something there. OR would I be better off moving that off and building a new shop with slightly more width and added length? The 12 width is a challenge now and it's hard for me to figure out how to situate things in this long and narrow configuration today. So open to any ideas.

We're going to look into adding a bigger detached shop away from the easement but that requires a fight with the HOA and that's never "fun".
 

Sourwould

Taylor
User
Adding 2 ft of width to a stick framed building doesn't seem worth the trouble, in my opinion.

How would you extend the joists and rafters to meet the new wall?
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
We're going to look into adding a bigger detached shop away from the easement but that requires a fight with the HOA and that's never "fun".

It'd be preferable and easier to build a new standalone shop. More expensive but.....
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
I am assuming you meant a Gambrel Roof. I attached a little sketch showing the basic building. The two walls edges that die into the wall ... those walls are load bearing. That means they receive the lion's share of the roof framing and roof weight. Trying to move either one of those would be hard, not impossible but hard and costlier.

Moving the end wall is pretty easy really. You would need 2 - 4 x 6's (vertical bracing for the ridge-back of the roof) & 2x4's bracing for the shoring, and of course plywood on the ground to prevent damage to the floor.

Assuming you already have your concrete and foundation and misc demo done....

If I did this I would consider using a telehandler -a forklift that has a extendable boom. First frame the new extended walls - shore these from the outside, then shore up the building, then cut the wall to move free and have the forklift hold it up. Then build the roof loaded walls extended shore these from the outside, then use the forklift to move the existing freed wall to its new location and then tie the new extended walls into the relocated wall. Now frame in your new roof, roof it and you are done done the wall relocation. Then finish out how ever you decide
 

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decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
Good point guys I figured adding width was a pain. I'll have to start gathering quotes. I figure I could construct a longer building for 5K - 7K maybe. I think we spent 3K on this one way back when. If we go to a bigger shop away from the easement I have no idea how much that would be. I'd probably go in the range of a 36X24 and that would be a pretty penny but cheaper than buying a new house :)
 

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
I am assuming you meant a Gambrel Roof. I attached a little sketch showing the basic building. The two walls edges that die into the wall ... those walls are load bearing. That means they receive the lion's share of the roof framing and roof weight. Trying to move either one of those would be hard, not impossible but hard and costlier.

Moving the end wall is pretty easy really. You would need 2 - 4 x 6's (vertical bracing for the ridge-back of the roof) & 2x4's bracing for the shoring, and of course plywood on the ground to prevent damage to the floor.

Assuming you already have your concrete and foundation and misc demo done....

If I did this I would consider using a telehandler -a forklift that has a extendable boom. First frame the new extended walls - shore these from the outside, then shore up the building, then cut the wall to move free and have the forklift hold it up. Then build the roof loaded walls extended shore these from the outside, then use the forklift to move the existing freed wall to its new location and then tie the new extended walls into the relocated wall. Now frame in your new roof, roof it and you are done done the wall relocation. Then finish out how ever you decide
You raise a good point I didn't think about :( Right now I could get a away foundation on skids and concrete blocks but if I get longer that may be an issue. If I have to go through pouring a foundation then I might as well go big or go home right? Thanks for the sketch that helps a lot. I think in this instance a picture is worth a thousand words so I'll take some photos.

Man I missed this place everybody is super helpful!
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
The 12 width is a challenge now and it's hard for me to figure out how to situate things in this long and narrow configuration today.
That limitation will still exist after you add on to your current shop.
 

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
That limitation will still exist after you add on to your current shop.
Yup it will part of the challenge is I have a "pinch" point because the table saw and jointer are side by side as since they need significant in-feed/out-feed space. If it's longer I could spread them out more. As it is now I have like a 1 foot wide walk way between them and for longer boards I still may run into the lathe at the back of the shop :mad:. Someone who's better at organizing could probably make a better layout as I suck at that. Probably doesn't help I kept buying more machinery. It looked like so big until it wasn't :cool:
 

Mike Wilkins

Mike
Senior User
Consider a shed roof to expand the width. Easy to frame; just carefully remove the siding on that side and re-use it on the addition. Less material to purchase for the long wall ends.
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have a 22x 32 which is too small. This is not really a solution how about showing pictures and layout of your shop? It won't make it bigger but maybe someone could give you some suggestions to make better use of the space you do have and thus make it workable.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
If the HOA will allow, build a new shop (IMHO 16 x 24 would be the absolute minimum size considering the power tools you have). Keep the old shed for lawn/garden tool storage, recreational equipment storage, and lumber storage. Who knows, you may even be able to clean out the garage enough to actually park a vehicle in there!! LOL

I built a 16 x 24 shop to get me out of the garage so I could at least get the vehicles under shelter during the threat of hail storms, etc. Although that was successful, I still have the lawn mower outside, and am seriously considering at least a 12 x 12 to store the other stuff that has infiltrated my work space.
 
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nn4jw

Jim
Senior User
Good point guys I figured adding width was a pain. I'll have to start gathering quotes. I figure I could construct a longer building for 5K - 7K maybe. I think we spent 3K on this one way back when. If we go to a bigger shop away from the easement I have no idea how much that would be. I'd probably go in the range of a 36X24 and that would be a pretty penny but cheaper than buying a new house :)
Back in 2012 I had a detached 2-car 2-story 24x24 garage built behind my house to use as my shop. (It's never had a car inside it, Jack.) By the time the trees and stumps were removed, grading done, slab poured, garage built, wiring done, gravel placed and the main concrete driveway replaced I was around 40K into it. That's before I moved any new tools into that shop. I don't regret any of it, but it all added up quick. That was 8 years ago. I don't know but suspect it would cost more today.

We moved ito our house back in 1977 for $41,500. So that garage cost about the same as our house. Just not in the same value dollars. The house has appreciated over the years. Garage probably has some too.

A 36x24 could cost more depending on what you end up building.
 

Charlie

Charlie
Corporate Member
Oh for the good old days!
I built my 28 x 36 shop in 1991. Wooden floor construction, concrete block foundation. Completely finished outside and inside. Including all electrical and lighting. Ready to move the equipment in place.
Total cost was $11,250.
But, I did "all" the labor, from digging the footings with pick and shovel, to laying the cement blocks, to driving every nail with a hammer, etc, etc. I had help one day to install the trusses and roof sheathing.
And I was 30 years younger. Lol.
I would guess today's cost to have it built would be 50-60K.
 

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