Anyone have experience with Durata for countertops?

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wdwrkr

New User
wdwrkr
Starting a kitchen countertop project - in solid cherry. Need a finish that is tough enough for hard kitchen use - standing water, scratches, coffee, wine, etc.
Found Durata in search, but have no experience with it.
On previous projects I've used polyurethane. It holds up very well on bathroom vanities (the oldest is about 6 years) with lots of standing water on a regular basis, but I haven't used it in a kitchen.
I would love to hear from anyone that can verify the durability after several years.
 

PeteM

Pete
Corporate Member
The info on their website says:

"Durata® finish is sold applied to Grothouse wood countertops and is not available for onsite application."

pete
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
I had wood countertops finished with Waterlox for ten years in my last house. About every two or three years i would scuff the surface and wipe on a fresh coat. Waterlox works great!!!
 

wdwrkr

New User
wdwrkr
Thanks for the input. I have used Waterlox for exterior doors and like it. Hadn't considered it for the countertops. Phil, did you use the interior grade first as a "primer" and then the exterior grade over that? Also, how many coats did it to take to get an adequate protection level?

Also, thanks Pete for pointing out Durata is not available for purchase - oh well.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Another +1 to Waterlox Original Sealer/Finish specifically along with loads of good information and tips at their website. It does not need to be sanded between coats like polyurethane for adhesion purposes. However, before the final coat it helps to lightly sand it with the grain using 320 grit and then wipe it down with MS. Let that final coat cure for several days and if that final gloss is more than you like then it can be burnished a bit (again with the grain) with Norton Bear-Tex pads (#74800). A glossy surface is more prone to show slight scratches, etc. whereas a satin surface is more forgiving to the eye.

http://www.nortonindustrial.com/uploadedFiles/SGindnortonabrasives/Documents/Catalog_PDFs/NortonCatalog-Bear-Tex-GeneralInfoCrossReferences.pdf

Waterlox cures by exposure to oxygen so do invest in a few cans of Bloxygen (argon gas) to blanket and protect residual product in its original container. Do not put unused finish back in that original container or the entire residual may turn into a useless gel even with Bloxygen. :eek:
 
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