Any reason this would not work?

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Yes, an old Delta or sears/Dunlap style. I don't have a stand so I will have to build a stand and motor mount anyway.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
It is listed as a "Servo-motor"
I would be concerned with its continuous-duty capability...
You would have to go into it thinking it is either a cheap solution or a $109 lesson, if it failed...
 

tghsmith

tghs
User
my 7"x 16" benchtop metal lathe uses a 500w brushless motor , lots of power , the trick might be in the belt and pully set up to get the speeds you want with the torque needed.. I've seen 750w kits with this type of motor for lathe upgrades.. (cost alot more but they are bolt up with belt brackets and pully included..
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Intriguing idea. I'd guess there's a little figuring to how you'll hook up a substitution for the footswitch control usually used.
Keep us updated. You may be on to something.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
my 7"x 16" benchtop metal lathe uses a 500w brushless motor , lots of power , the trick might be in the belt and pully set up to get the speeds you want with the torque needed.. I've seen 750w kits with this type of motor for lathe upgrades.. (cost alot more but they are bolt up with belt brackets and pully included..
They are available up to 800 watts for not much more.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
The specs talk about reliable braking. That could prove to be an annoyance on a wood lathe. Once the power is cut off, I suspect you'd want the motor to coast to a stop.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I had an inverter with 5hp 3phase motor added to my big lathe and a friend from work programmed the inverter for me. He said it could stop dead or ramp down, I chose to ramp down because the size of wood used there could have some inertia.

I think these little lathes could stop without a problem. Might even be safer for newbies.
 

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
my 7"x 16" benchtop metal lathe uses a 500w brushless motor , lots of power , the trick might be in the belt and pully set up to get the speeds you want with the torque needed.. I've seen 750w kits with this type of motor for lathe upgrades.. (cost alot more but they are bolt up with belt brackets and pully included..

TGH is on the right track. The biggest potential problem I see is whether the motor will be powerful enough to spin your wood through some heavy handed chiseling. If it's not right out of the box, when you build the base and motor mount build in a 2:1 drive train reduction. If the motor is spinning at 2000 rpm and turning your working piece at 1000 rpm, there ought to be enough torque at the piece. The variable speed motor will let you fine tune the torque/wood speed to get it to operate just like you want. Be sure and show NCWW your finished machine along with a product review.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, Events Director
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
It should work fine. Personally I would go with the 750 watt model for $120
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
I put a 2 hp 3ph motor on my Delta lathe. I used a VFD to convert from single phase 220 to 3ph 208/230. The unit was around 150-160 range
The economics of it is once you go over a 2-3 hp motor size you are looking at a 500 + dollar cost for the VFD that can support it. Unless, you are really good at converting Frankenstein units to applications they were not originally intended for.
To me, I just do not have the will for that, I just got a simple plug n play units, no thinking (very little) easy directions and Voila' a variable speed unit from 50 rpm to 4000 (if wanted).

I tried a DC motor 1st but, DC Motors have virtually no torque below 150 rpm. And, the torque on them were not as smooth through the speed range.

The beauty of the 3 ph motor is the low end torque is excellent and the torque range is awesome from low rpm to 100% VFD range.

The problem with the sewing motors is you need to get a commercial sewing machine. I have a motor off a commercial serger (was a Yuki) 2/3 hp. But it would only have enough power for small things.

FYI- I got all my motors for free......... Craigslist is your friend.
Hobart mixers that the motor is ok are usually 2 hp 3 ph

Commercial Treadmills are usually 1.5-3 hp 3 ph motors with a vfd. These are usually given away for free when the electronics blow on them. Sometimes the VFD in them are still good, it takes a bit to decipher the leads to convert to a tool machine (ergo the Frankenstein comment). Home units are mostly DC Motors.

Some commercial package hvac units usually they get old or are R-12 so clients trash them for a newer unit.

What is funny as long as the 3 ph motors are 3 hp or less they are really worth the effort. And......... most people see the 3 ph on the motor and see it as something they cannot use........ their loss your gain ........ ;)
 
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Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
It should work fine. Personally I would go with the 750 watt model for $120
You’re not as che...—— frugal as I am.

When I go up to 750 watts the controller is about $250.. might as well go 3ph with VFD inverter.
 
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