Advise plz - edge joining

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CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
I'm fixing on edge joining (glue up) a 1x12-8 chunk of QSRO that would make a 1x24-4 table top but I'm going to hack it back to a 7/8 x 21 x 39. Should I put a couple of cross grain braces to hold the thing flat? If so how far should the be spaced apart?

Thanks
 

BillPappas

New User
Bill
Jeff,

Assuming the wood was dry and was allowed to stabilize during sizing you really shouldn't need cross braces I wouldn't think. If you did add the cross braces I would place them 10-12 inches from each end.

Regards,

Bill
 

CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
Jeff,

Assuming the wood was dry and was allowed to stabilize during sizing you really shouldn't need cross braces I wouldn't think. If you did add the cross braces I would place them 10-12 inches from each end.

Regards,

Bill

Thanks Bill - The board is good and dry, I'm almost thinking and that can be dangerous... When the wood decides it's gonna move, a cross brace might do more harm than good. Being QS I'm not conserned with cupping like FS has a tendency to do. I wouldn't dare glue in a brace, that's just asking for trouble... but I would snug it up with screws about every 6" or so.
 

nelsone

New User
Ed
Breadboards would address your concern.

If you want to keep the endgrain and use cross braces, I would suggest sliding dovetails.
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
wide board edge glueing can be problematic. even QS material moves with changes in temps and humidity. I would rip alternate and re-glue at around 4" each. grain matching shouldn't be too much trouble using the same board or run of boards.
 

rbdoby

New User
Rick
A lot depends on how you build you table frame. If it has a skirt all the way around you could use figure 8"s to attach the top to the frame. That will help hold the top flat and allow for wood movement.

No matter low you build it you can not stop wood from moving so plan for it.

Rick Doby
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have a 100 year old end table that has a top made from a single plank, full 20 inches wide. It is still pretty flat and doesn't have any breadboard ends, slats, dovetail slats nor anything else but the four screws in slotted holes at the corners
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
I have a 100 year old end table that has a top made from a single plank, full 20 inches wide. It is still pretty flat and doesn't have any breadboard ends, slats, dovetail slats nor anything else but the four screws in slotted holes at the corners


:gar-Bi yeh but..... try finding that quality timber these days.:rotflm:
 

pafekete

New User
Peggy
The biggest most important thing to remember when edge gluing is to align the boards with the end grains cupped differently. In other words if you look at the end grain of one board and it is cupped up like a smiley face then turn the next board so that it's end grain looks like a frowny face. (can you tell I'm a girl woodworker?) Anyway also on long boards I now use a loose tenon system from fesstool that is like biscuits only better and easier to align. It's hard not to end up with sanding dips in big glueups due to misalignments. Good luck.
 

CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
The biggest most important thing to remember when edge gluing is to align the boards with the end grains cupped differently. In other words if you look at the end grain of one board and it is cupped up like a smiley face then turn the next board so that it's end grain looks like a frowny face. (can you tell I'm a girl woodworker?) Anyway also on long boards I now use a loose tenon system from fesstool that is like biscuits only better and easier to align. It's hard not to end up with sanding dips in big glueups due to misalignments. Good luck.

QS endgrain is nearly vertical, but your right a wise old man once told me you want your furniture to smile at you...

What I did is set rails 3/4" from the edge all the way around and set a screw every 6" If that don't hold it down not much else will.

Thanks for the tips :)
 

CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
:gar-Bi yeh but..... try finding that quality timber these days.:rotflm:

You won't - most everything this side of the Mississippi has been logged twice since the turn of the century. Old growth forest trees are gone, long gone...
 
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