A little electrical advice please...

llucas

luke
Senior User
I picked up a Penn State 2 1/2 hp dust collector from a fellow downsizing....looks to be in good shape...sounded ok when he plugged it in, and sucked pretty strongly.
It is labelled 110/220v on motor. He said he originally plugged it into a 110v outlet and it ran as he expected. Then he moved his shop and wanted it to run on 220v so he just cut off the original plug and spliced this on
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Then he plugged it into a suitable 220v at his new place and it ran just fine. He says he did NOT change any other wiring in the collector. That didn't really make sense to me.
Here is the motor schematic and wiring as it was when he most recently ran it.
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It looks to me to be set up for 220v...do you agree?
I will prolly run this as is, but I do have plans for a sanding station set up and may convert it to 110v.
What changes would I need to do to make that happen? Just reconnect the black and white at the top and the red and yellow at the top?
Sorry for my ignorance, but I know advice from you folks will help fill in the missing info.

Thanks for any advice.
 

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Mountain City Bill

Mountain City Bill
Corporate Member
I would suggest taking the cover off the capacitor ( near the wiring diagram) to see the value ( in mfd). Then write that value on the outside of the cover. That way if it smokes, it will be easy to order a replacement.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
I would suggest taking the cover off the capacitor ( near the wiring diagram) to see the value ( in mfd). Then write that value on the outside of the cover. That way if it smokes, it will be easy to order a replacement.
Excellent suggestion.
The label seems to say 26 amps on 110 volts and 13 amps on 220 volts. 26 amps is a lot to run on a 110 line, most of which are built for only 15 amps.
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
Excellent suggestion.
The label seems to say 26 amps on 110 volts and 13 amps on 220 volts. 26 amps is a lot to run on a 110 line, most of which are built for only 15 amps.
Hmmm...all my 110v lines are just 20amp circuits....probably not a good idea to run this on 110 then.
Thanks for that caution.
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
As a rule supposedly (of course who adheres to the rules) the inline prong type are 220/15a and the yellow one is 220/20a with one prong turned 90 deg
 

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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
FWIW, a single phase capacitor motor connected for 220 volts will run at idle on 110 volts, but under load, it bogs down rather quickly.
 

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