Your Thoughts on DeWalt 734 vs 735 Planer

KurtB

Kurt
User
I beginning to move on from using big box lumber to hardwoods. I'm thinking it's probably more cost effective to be able to plane it myself than to buy S4S. So I'm looking into planers. I'm not going to be using it for commercial production type volume, but may be running some 6-8 foot boards through for table tops.
I thought I'd check with you folks and get your thoughts on the 734 vs 735. I've seen a few different comparison reviews and there seem to be good and bad points for both. Any thoughts on the two would be appreciated.
Thanks very much for the input.
 

dancam

Dan
Corporate Member
I've had the Makita and it was ok, I then upgraded to the DW 734 and it was also pretty good but very noisy. I finally settled on the DW 735 w/outfeed tables and it was heads above the other two. Then about five years ago I upgraded the 735 with a Byrd shelix head and it was a great investment. I plane mostly hardwoods (oak, hickory & maple), and the shelix head leaves a great surface. If you can swing it, I'd suggest getting the 735 w/the Byrd head.
 

cyclopentadiene

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User
Most of the reviews on this site are for the 735 and I think most agree that it is an excellent planer
I purchased my 734 right before the 735 came out so I have had it quite a while. I have had no issues with the unit, especially for the cost as it was about $225 at the time. Blades last quite a while are easy to change and relatively inexpensive. The finish is excellent and depends on blade age. Downsides are it is noisy and you must do very small passes. The chip deflector works great but it takes a lot to remove them. I have a Oneida cylclone unit with about 700 CFM at the unit. I am not exactly sure why they tapered the outlet fron 4” to 2 1/2” as it would be much better with a larger port (this is my only true complaint)
The difference in price between a new 735 and a Grizzly or better stationary planer is not that much. Used units with a helical head can be found in a comparable range.
i have held out for several years in hopes of one day making the real plunge to a Hammer jointer planer combo bot $225 to $5500 is a huge leap!
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
I have the 734. It has served my well but, but in comparison to my neighbor's 735, I would say the 735 wins in less noise, better chip extraction, and less snipe. My chip extraction is done with a Ridgid shop vac, which means I use the 4" to 2" reducer. With the chip ejection port on the side, the result is that the chips on the far side from the port clog up in the extractor, and ultimately start getting spit out onto the work on that side. This results in a "peened" surface as opposed to smooth. It is also very difficult to remove the chip jam after it occurs. To prevent snipe, I run sacrificial wood in front of and behind my work piece.

IIRC, the 735 has its own fan to help in expelling the chips, as well as the outlet is centered on the blades. My neighbor's seems to do well even without a vacuum applied. His does have a larger footprint and is heavier, but that also makes it more stable.

If you have a full fledged vacuum system with 4" ducts, this may not be a problem for you. If you do not, I would strongly suggest you go to the 735.
 

wbarnes

Will
User
I have used both, although it has been about 5 years since I’ve used a 734. I recently picked up a used 735. I agree with everything already stated. 735 has better chip extraction, much less snipe, and is all around a better planer.

I can’t speak to value per cost as I bought my 735 used and the 734 wasn’t mine.

If I were you I would hold out for a used 735 if you can. They pop up frequently as people upgrade.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
The 734 and 735 both use indexed full length blades. That means the blades are pre drilled with index holes that fit over pins in the head. They are not adjustable. You must replace them after reversing one time to use the other side.

However, the 733 uses conventional adjustable blades that can be sharpened and readjusted many times thus lowering the total cost of operation. If you are in the middle of a project on Sunday afternoon and the blades are dull you can take them out, touch up on a set of diamond stones or even sandpaper as in the scary sharp method, reset the blades and you’re back on your way in 30 minutes or so.

I would not buy a 735 unless I was ordering the Shellix head along with it.
734 has other problems such as the chip fan and reduced size hose so is a non-starter for me.

Some people are happy with one or the other and your experience may vary.
 

bainin

bainin
User
Having not had a planer (beside a hand held makita) I chose the 734 based on this report and the substantial difference in cost to the 735.


So far its been good for me... a bit confused by the 4" to 2 1/2" mentioned above. Mine connects straight to 4" hose coupled to a 600CFM Jet unit.

I guess i need to look closer !

b
 

KurtB

Kurt
User
Thanks guys. Really appreciate your input. I had seen the comparison on toolbox buzz. Very good. The 735 definitely seems to be the better of the two overall and your experience with the vacuum port is helpful. I have recently seen the 734 going in and out of a $399.00 price on Home Depot so I thought I'd see what the Forum would think of the pair. Still have a few more weeks to search as we're in the middle of a master bath remodel. May be able to pick up a deal on a 735.
 

cyclopentadiene

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M
Having not had a planer (beside a hand held makita) I chose the 734 based on this report and the substantial difference in cost to the 735.


So far its been good for me... a bit confused by the 4" to 2 1/2" mentioned above. Mine connects straight to 4" hose coupled to a 600CFM Jet unit.

I guess i need to look closer !

I purchased my unit many years ago. This was an upgrade of the unit a few years later to go to 4”. I go 12 inch to the shop walls then 6” to chest hight on the walls and 4” to most machines. The planer has to go from a 4” blast gate to a 2 1/2” pipe. Not ideal
 

tvrgeek

Scott
Corporate Member
I too have a 735 and put a helical head in it. It works. But really, only rather thin cuts. The circuit breaker ia 18A on a 15A rated cord and plug on a machine that can easilly pull over 20A. So, thin cuts, low duty cycle, and you still have to plane or sand. Buy breakers in bulk as they fail.

Where for a ton of money, the Powermatic will eat what you feed it and it comes out scraper ready. Worth the difference. I am not sure anything in-between ( jet popular) is worth the extra. Go big or go home.

IMHO, helical carbide or nothing. I think I kicked a knife every other time I used it before.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Having not had a planer (beside a hand held makita) I chose the 734 based on this report and the substantial difference in cost to the 735.


So far its been good for me... a bit confused by the 4" to 2 1/2" mentioned above. Mine connects straight to 4" hose coupled to a 600CFM Jet unit.

I guess i need to look closer !

b
Mine came with a 4" to 2" reducer that slides on the outlet. If you already had 4" duct, you probably never installed yours. If you are like me, its probably laying in a box somewhere so later on you can look at it and say" Wonder what that was for?" LOL.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Can't knock either - as their users seem to love them - the 735 seems to be especially popular. I have no experience with either.

Unless I was very tight on space - I would opt for a stationary planer (floor model) with an induction motor. On the used market these CAN occasionally be found for the DW735 price new. These often (typically?) requires 220V juice, as distinct dis-ad if that is not available to you. Floor models offer more cutting width (typically 15-20"), power, mass, and cutting power (in case you want/need to take 1/2 off in a few passes, not 16 passes). These are typically lifetime tools - that will outlast you.

Just a thought - it does of course involve way more searching and hunting than finding the best price online for a new item - and that requires time and energy.
 

golfdad

Co-director of Outreach
Dirk
Corporate Member
I also have a 735 and have never popped a breaker in 8 yrs. Great machine
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
The 735 is worth the money. As far as electrical demand and breakers popping-

Make sure on all shop tools you are wiring from the box to the tool in 12 ga wire (in cord also). Make sure you are using THHN (90c) most wire nowadays is THHN, make sure the termination connections are rated 90c. If you have older breakers or Homeline type breakers, then replace with a commercial rated breaker. All these things will cause additional resistance that will cause the breakers to pop. Remember, most shop tools do pull more power. And as such, they need better more robust systems to support them.
My 735 has never popped a breaker in my home and I only plane woods that are hard woods -maple and harder. I have no soft wood projects. Getting a Sheelix is the next step.

Hope that helps.
 
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drw

Donn
Corporate Member
I have had the 735 for 12 years and have found it to be a great machine. I take very light passes, so the knives last a very long time. I am considering installing a helical cutter, but given my satisfaction with the current set-up I can't bring myself to pull the trigger.
 

demondeacon

Dave
Senior User
Kurt, you may want to wait another month or so. Last Christmas either Rockler or Woodcraft had a very compelling sale offer for the 735. As I recall both the stand and the two tables were included in an all inclusive price for about the normal planer cost. I am considering buying one as well and plan to wait to for the specials after Thanksgiving.
 

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