Window A/C in a door?

Status
Not open for further replies.

gdoebs

New User
Geoff
I'd like to put A/C in my shop. I've look at portable units but don't have the space for one, nor do I want to drill holes in the side of my garage/shop. They are also too expensive for me right now. I don't have a window but I do have a steel entry door. It has some rust on the bottom of it, so it should probably be replaced someday. I'm wondering if it's possible to cut a hole in the door, add some framing to reinforce the door and to provide a place to mount a window A/C unit. Window units are much cheaper.

Anybody think it would work? Worst case is that it doesn't work well and I just replace the door, or build a wood one suitable to hold the A/C unit.
 

MikeL

New User
Michael
It can work! I also wanted to add an A/C unit to my garage shop. It was somewhat of an experiment, but it worked. I will take a few photos tomorrow to share with you. The biggest challenge was providing support/security for the unit. Depending on how your door is constructed, you may find that once you cut out the hole for the unit that there is some flexing at the edges along the cuts (my experience). I got creative with some angle, channel, etc. In the end, it worked. The door will be easy enough to replace should I need to in the future.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
The biggest problem will be stress to the hinge screws. This, in turn, will cause flexing in the jamb. Get some long screws for the hinges that will take the screw into the door jack. Is the door a flush commercial type door, or a residential door?
 

Truefire

Chris
User
Go for it brother, on those hot "dog days" you that are just around the corner and it is too hot to do anything else enjoyable you will be able to find solace there in your shop.

Go for it....

Chris
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
Don't know your environment, but a castor at the bottom of the door could help support the extra weight.
 

gdoebs

New User
Geoff
The biggest problem will be stress to the hinge screws. This, in turn, will cause flexing in the jamb. Get some long screws for the hinges that will take the screw into the door jack. Is the door a flush commercial type door, or a residential door?
Excellent point. I didn't think about that. And knowing that this door was probably installed like my front and back door, the only thing holding it in are the finish nails through the brick molding! I'll definately reinforce the hinges!

The door is a residential door with the fake raised panels.
 

MikeL

New User
Michael
Here are some photos of my solution. Please keep in mind that I never used this door. While I can still open it, it cannot be opened all the way. Depending on the depth of the unit installed and nearby exterior wall restrictions, you may or may not be able to open the door all the way. It may be hard to see how I put this together. I'd be happy to answer any questions. Hope this helps.

Mike








 

MikeL

New User
Michael
It is not very clear in the photos, but there are four carriage bolts used in total. First, two were used to bolt two pieces of angle together. These two pieces are positioned in the same orientation, an inverted "L" shape, on both the interior and exterior sides of the door. Positioning the middle piece of angle this way allowed the horizontal leg of the angle to span the depth of the door (the metal door is hollow and filled with foam). I found this necessary to provide adequate support for the unit. I then used two carriage bolts on the inside to secure a third piece of angle against the A/C unit's bottom flange. ***IMPORTANT NOTE*** I had to go ahead and install the last two carriage bolts before mounting the middle piece and tightening the first set of bolts used (I had to undo and redo some work once I discovered this!!!) I positioned these last two carriage bolts on the far left and right sides so that the carriage heads were located in the voids of the raised panel door. I wish I had some in-progress pics to share. Good luck!
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Having a welder, I would build a reinforcing frame out of bed rails. (I pick these up for FREE at the dump, or besides the street.) This would stop the door from flexing. Add a castor as Joe suggested. or a diagonal piece of cable, anchored to the framing of the shop.
 

MikeL

New User
Michael
If the door is to remain operable, I would follow the advice expressed above concerning reinforcement. I encountered no issues with flexing, but I do not use the door. My biggest caution would be to consider the depth of the A/C unit if you are hoping to continue using the door as an entrance/exit.
 

gdoebs

New User
Geoff
Thanks guys. I'd like the door to remain operable. I don't use it all the time but our trash and recycling bins are outside that door. The space is just under 400 sqft. and the units I've been looking at are arount 19" deep. I'm guessing that means about 15" would stick out on the outside of the door. I may attempt to install the unit more towards the hinge side to keep more weight on the hinges and get more clearance to open the door. I also like the idea of a castor.

One question: MikeL, what'd you use to cut the hole?
 

MikeL

New User
Michael
I did the majority of the cutting with a circular saw and reversed the blade. I cleaned the corners up with a jig saw.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top