Want to add a router to my sawstop table

Billm0066

Bill
User
I have a sawstop cabinet saw with wood side tables. I dont do a lot of routing so I dont need the best out there. I just need a decent lift/router when I need to round over or chamfer something. I was considering a Triton router like this Amazon.com with a Kreg insert/switch. I do a lot of cutting boards and like adding a chamfer to them so I need a fence. It seems feasible I could build a fence from plywood that rides over the sawstop fence. Thoughts?

I've never added a router to a table or built my own router table. Currently im using a cheap router/table I bought from lowes and it's a pos. Floor and bench space is important so getting it built into my table saw would be ideal for me. Am I on the right track? Anything else I should consider?
 

mquan01

Mike
Corporate Member
I havent built an accessory fence yet, I just use the sawstop fence and it works fine for me. I got the Jessem router lift and it works for me.
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
I have the Tridon router. Works great except the spindle lock position is a pain when it is mounted. The router has it's own built in lift, so just mounted in a Kreg plate I have a DIY table as part of my outfeed table. One can build a offset fence that sits over the SS fence so as to get a proper gap for the bit. I have a generic router table fence. fence. Bought a magnetic power switch off the WEB. Much cheaper.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I used to have a router table capability on a different saw. All I did was route out the shape of the fixed base of my router on the underside of the side table, drill a hole with a hole saw for the bit, attach a spare fixed base, and put T nuts for the fence into the side table. Then I made a fence for the router that had slotted holes (several inches) for adjustment. Knobs with studs went through the fence into the t nuts. Worked fine but it seemed like I needed to use the saw for a wide cut just when I got the router setup all in place too often. Now with a track saw it might be less of a conflict.
 

beloitdavisja

James
Corporate Member
If you're not doing a lot of routing, I think the Triton is a great choice. You can get the Kreg insert plate pre-drilled for the triton. the predrilled holes include a hole for the lift mechanism built into the triton. I also got the plate levelers which made installing and leveling relatively easy. I just did this and it is working well. You can see pictures of how I mounted mine on my thread. I'm planning on making a fence that attaches to my table saw fence for some better dust collection, but for right now using the table saw fence alone works well.

One draw backs is when changing bits, you have to remember to reach under and turn the switch on the router off. The triton auto locks the spindle when you lift it to the top, but it won't fully come up unless the power switch is off. This makes sense if the router isn't table mounted, but when it is table mounted you'll most likely have the router switch on and plugged into a switch (mine is a foot pedal). This isn't a big deal, but it had me scratching my head as to why I couldn't lift it up all the way.

If the router was something that I used regularly, I would've invested in a good lift. Seems like you're in my situation - you want the convenience of having a router table when you need it, but don't need a big expensive lift setup. I think the Triton serves this need well.
 

cobraguy

Clay
Corporate Member
I added a router table to my SawStop 3HP with 36" T-Glide. I ordered an Incra table to build a stand alone router table, but the table top came in damaged. Incra sent a new top at no extra charge and didn't want the broken one back. (Great customer service!) So what to do with the damaged top? Install it on my saw! It works great for my non-precision routing tasks using the guide pin or saw fence. (round overs, simple dados and rabbets, etc) I still have the new Incra table for when I eventually build a dedicated routing station but, with the saw option, that has dropped on my priority list. My plate version has the magnetic inserts and the Incra dust collection attachment fits underneath; barely. Adding the table was fairly straight forward once cut to size. Added a couple supports and shimmed it to fit. Very doable. Though I used Incra, any quality brand should work just fine. The only real consideration is making sure you get the plate/lift configured for your router and the dimensions don't interfere with critical support infrastructure on the saw. Very happy with the the result and relative ease of adding the table to the SawStop. Also, make sure however you install the table it will support the weight of the router. Sags are not good.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
"triton auto locks the spindle when you lift it to the top "
? That would imply it would lock when full plunge. I'll go play with mine, but my Triton has a manual pin lock at the base of the motor which is hard to reach in to press. I'll go check my model number in a bit.

My old 1/4 Craftsman has the lock at the top end of the motor and would actually be easier in a table.
 

beloitdavisja

James
Corporate Member
"triton auto locks the spindle when you lift it to the top "
? That would imply it would lock when full plunge. I'll go play with mine, but my Triton has a manual pin lock at the base of the motor which is hard to reach in to press. I'll go check my model number in a bit.

My old 1/4 Craftsman has the lock at the top end of the motor and would actually be easier in a table.
The TRA001 Triton plunges past full plunge so the collet is above the base. Once the collet goes above the base, it automatically locks the spindle. No pin or button to press to lock. You may have an different or older model. When mounted on a table, this means that the collet is above the surface of the table and the spindle locked to allow changing of the bit. It makes sense that they prevent you from plunging past the base when the power switch is on, since it would most certainly break something if the spindle was actually spinning when the lock engages. All my other routers (dewalt&craftsman) have a lock button that must be pressed to lock the spindle.

From the manual:

IMG_3097.jpeg



You can see it in action in this video (starting at the 4:00 mark:

 

RobH

Rob
User
I have a sawstop cabinet saw with wood side tables. I dont do a lot of routing so I dont need the best out there. I just need a decent lift/router when I need to round over or chamfer something. I was considering a Triton router like this Amazon.com with a Kreg insert/switch. I do a lot of cutting boards and like adding a chamfer to them so I need a fence. It seems feasible I could build a fence from plywood that rides over the sawstop fence. Thoughts?

I've never added a router to a table or built my own router table. Currently im using a cheap router/table I bought from lowes and it's a pos. Floor and bench space is important so getting it built into my table saw would be ideal for me. Am I on the right track? Anything else I should consider?
I built a router top into the stock Formica/mdf sawstop extension. The stock extension is 3/4 so I contact cemented a second layer of mdf on the underside of the stock extension to make it 1.5” thick. This made it more sturdy especially after I routed out the top for t track and the router lift. The cabinet is separate from the top but i sized it to sit under the modified extension and it is raised up to the extension with adjustable legs so there is no pull downwards on the modified and heavier (with the heavier double mdf, router loft and 3hp porter cable router). rather, the cabinet supports the extension in place of the sawstop legs that I removed.
not sure if that all makes sense but here is a pic. I can share more detail if interested.
 

Attachments

junquecol

Bruce
User
I'm not a fan of a router mounted in right wing of table saw. First, you have to have the right side of the saw clear, not against the wall, posts etc. Second, you route from back to front of the saw, which means walking around the saw to use router. Mount router in left wing, and routing is in same direction as sawing. The fence could be "quick connect," so to not be in the way when not needed. Remember 90%+ of your routing is edge routing, so you don't need a lot of table in front of the bit.
 

Bear Republic

Steve
Corporate Member
Just a side thought, if you're looking to add it for easy routing. I've found that the new trim routers are light and easy to control. I have a Bosch Colt. Really easy to quickly take the edge off of pieces. I picked out up for that propose rather than taking out the bigger router all the time Just a thought.
 

Billm0066

Bill
User
I'm not a fan of a router mounted in right wing of table saw. First, you have to have the right side of the saw clear, not against the wall, posts etc. Second, you route from back to front of the saw, which means walking around the saw to use router. Mount router in left wing, and routing is in same direction as sawing. The fence could be "quick connect," so to not be in the way when not needed. Remember 90%+ of your routing is edge routing, so you don't need a lot of table in front of the bit.
Left side of saw is against a wall. I pull it away when I need to use it since I dont have the width in my shop to keep it out. Needs to be on the right.

Just a side thought, if you're looking to add it for easy routing. I've found that the new trim routers are light and easy to control. I have a Bosch Colt. Really easy to quickly take the edge off of pieces. I picked out up for that propose rather than taking out the bigger router all the time Just a thought.
I already have a trim router. I need a table and a fence.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top