Switch for Delta Bandsaw

Steve_Honeycutt

Chat Administartor
Steve
Corporate Member
I need to replace the on/off switch on my Delta band saw. Any advice that people can provide, such as where to buy, anything to be careful of, or a good switch to get would be greatly appreciated.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
It would be most helpful to know what type of saw you have. As an example, I have a 14" open stand Delta BS. The switch was originally a toggle switch located on the stand. Looking at the frame, there are two holes that match the mounting holes for a 2 X 4 handy box, so I relocated switch from stand to frame of the saw. This places switch at eye level, thus no bending to get to the switch. An ordinary snap (light) switch, or toggle switch would serve on my saw, as the motor is only 1.25 HP.
 

Steve_Honeycutt

Chat Administartor
Steve
Corporate Member
Thanks Bruce, I should have provided more complete information.

The band saw is a Rockwell model 28-203 with a 1.5 hp Dayton motor. It has an enclosed stand.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
What hank suggested is the way to go. I replaced my switch with a paddle stop switch which is also shown on the page linked to.

Remember a switch is a switch
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
Years ago, I heard that magnetic switches were "the greatest thing" and they are, because if the power goes out or with an overload, the magnet disengages and the switch will not reengage until the switch is shut off and power is restored to the circuit. First, those switched are SUPER expensive... and a buddy of mine said - it is a switch... I tried to defend that it was a safety thing, which is true, but in the end - a switch is a switch (I heard that somewhere! ha ha)
 
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Roy G

Roy
Senior User
I would be looking for a motor starter, rather than a switch. They look the same but the contacts are much beefier on the starter and the construction is much heavier duty. Try eBay or craigs list.

Roy G
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
120 volts or 230 volts?
There can be a big difference.
Best case: A motor starter with NEMA size 1 contactor.
I think that "ratings" for home shop grade switches are done by the same people that say my orange plastic shop vacuum has a six horsepower motor in it.

Below is my Delta saw with a NEMA size 1 starter controlling a 1 HP heavy duty motor.

1 BS switch - 1.jpg
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
120 volts or 230 volts?
There can be a big difference.
Best case: A motor starter with NEMA size 1 contactor.
I think that "ratings" for home shop grade switches are done by the same people that say my orange plastic shop vacuum has a six horsepower motor in it.

Below is my Delta saw with a NEMA size 1 starter controlling a 1 HP heavy duty motor.

View attachment 190323
Notice where switch is located. Uusually there are two holes already drilled in frame which match up to the holes in a 2 X 4 handybox.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
A 1.5 HP motor on a standard 15 amp 120 volt residential circuit will have quite a strong amp draw. On startup and stop, a 1.5 HP motor will momentarily pull three or more times the motor's amp rating. This arcing can be devastating on the switch contact points and also constrict flow to the capacitor. Lightweight switches (starters) will wear out quickly under these circumstances.

1 contacts - 1.jpg

Above is a comparison shot when I was studying the ratings and contacts on a Furnas 12BA manual switch. I had found those manual motor starters would burn out on a regular basis. As you can see, the buttons on the far left are much larger than those of the 12BA switch on the right. NEMA ratings are fairly straight forward and honest. As you can see, a NEMA size OO (middle) is only rated for 1/3 HP at 115 volts. Those contacts are about equal to those of the 12BA manual switch, yet the 12BA label claims 2 HP at 120 volts. On the far right is a household light switch contacts point set.

1 contacts - 2.jpg

A better comparative view. On the left is NEMA size 0, middle size 00, and on the right the dinky little contacts out of the switch labeled to take 2 HP at 120 volts.

1 contacts - 3.jpg


This is a shot from another study I did that shows the difference in what you actually get compared to the printed "ratings" on the switch. As you can see, NEMA size 0 in the middle is pretty stout compared to the Asian import. The NEMA size 1 on the right is what I'd have to choose for 15 amps at 120 volts.

Being familiar with these component comparisons is important in knowing what you're getting in a switch and probably more important, NOT getting in a switch.
 

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