Steel building

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
My 30 x 45 shop stick built with AC, 240V and 3ph just ran out of space.

Looking at adding a 24 X 30 steel building in close proximity with the main purpose being storage of lumber and inventory.

If I do the concrete pad myself, leveling, compacting and boxing, I will use a sub to pour the pad. Doing it that way looks as if I can get it done for under $10k.

The challenge is there are hundreds of steel building kit suppliers around, and not much difference in price doing it myself or using someone in NC.

Anyone do business with these folks linked below, any references?

 

HMH

Heath Hendrick
Senior User
Hi Willem, I know that you and I were in similar boats before re: house construction, and along my decision process, I had a 24x36 pole barn, (poles and roof only, no slab or walls), installed by a commercial contractor that I deal w/ regularly via my engineering business for a VERY reasonable cost in my opinion vs. a metal building, which was also a consideration. My barn is a shelter only for my tractors, implements, misc odds/ ends, so I skipped the walls for easier access from all sides, but they were not a tremendous add to the original scope. Glad to pass along specifics/ talk more via PM if you’re interested in that as an option.
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
My son had a steel building. He told me that it was hard to heat in winter & in summer it was like trying to work in a oven.

Pop
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Willem--If you're expanding your business it suggests you turned down that big $ job back East. I'm glad you're staying here and continuing your woodworking. You are a valued member of NCWW.
Thanks for the complements. I followed the advice from my good friends here and money cannot buy the great quality of life in Pinehurst compared to that in upstate New York.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Hi Willem, I know that you and I were in similar boats before re: house construction, and along my decision process, I had a 24x36 pole barn, (poles and roof only, no slab or walls), installed by a commercial contractor that I deal w/ regularly via my engineering business for a VERY reasonable cost in my opinion vs. a metal building, which was also a consideration. My barn is a shelter only for my tractors, implements, misc odds/ ends, so I skipped the walls for easier access from all sides, but they were not a tremendous add to the original scope. Glad to pass along specifics/ talk more via PM if you’re interested in that as an option.
Thx. PM sent.
 

Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
I have Built close to a hundred pre-engineered buildings. Here are the things to consider when deciding on the building.

Plan on insulating the walls with R-19 and R-30 on the ceiling. If you do not it will be too cold in the winter and too hot in the summer.

When considering Metal buildings do not get some super light gauge structure. Most standard building are 14 or 16 ga girts and purlins.

If possible, do not get tapered columns. The tapered columns are generally cheaper but they make the finishing a real pain.

When picking a manufacturer, make sure their QC is good. For example, Dean buildings holes never lined up- ever, this meant extra labor. A lot of their dimensions that are cut are off. Not good.

Alot of companies will buy standardized material. Usually they get it from MBCI....... (Metal building component Inc)

If they use standardized part configurations, it makes it easy to buy additional stuff after completion.

Just some Ideas.
 
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chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
I would think for lumber storage, if kiln dried, youd want climate control?. If so, I would forego the steel building all together and stick build it. Because at some point youre gonna want to finish the inside. I went through this thought process when I built my shop. Steel shells are cheap. But, the realization I came to was id need to build walls inside for insulation, wiring and some sort of wall covering to attach anything to. I couldnt see building a building inside of another!. Just my 2 cents.
 

AllanD

Allan
Senior User
With the cost of construction lumber becoming obscene, more and more people I talk to are going with steel. I have been going through the motions over the past year on putting another building here on the farm and bit the bullet on a steel building. It is quite reasonable compared to the stick built estimates. This building will be 48 by 32, on a slab, with spray foam insulation.
Apparently there are two types: tubular steel and red iron. Red iron is heavier and more expensive but for your planned size tubular steel would be fine. I just met with all the subs yesterday and hope to break ground next week. Feel free to contact me if you are interested in my experience going through this.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I would think for lumber storage, if kiln dried, youd want climate control?. If so, I would forego the steel building all together and stick build it. Because at some point youre gonna want to finish the inside. I went through this thought process when I built my shop. Steel shells are cheap. But, the realization I came to was id need to build walls inside for insulation, wiring and some sort of wall covering to attach anything to. I couldnt see building a building inside of another!. Just my 2 cents.
In central NC without climate control in a closed environment we are looking at around 11% MC compared to 8% under climate control. It’s really not an issue about 3/8” shrinkage over 4’ width.

95% Of the cabinets done in industry today go into homes under construction still waiting for floors, doors, no AC. And sometimes they sit there for three months, before things are closed up and conditioned.
 

TBoomz

Ron
User
anyone thinking of doing foam insulation, I would suggest using batts for the ceiling. There's maybe 1" spray foam on the walls and ceiling of my Morton steel building.
When it's barely misting [rain] outside -at a point when it doesn't even feel/look like rain's coming down - inside?...sounds like gravel is raining down over the roof. Once the rain picks up, the noise from the ceiling is louder than some of my machinery. I actually have to step outside [the shop] to make / answer a phone call. My brother's shop has thick batts and it is quiet - even with heavy rain. Mine also has a roof ridge vent, but I still need a fan in summer.
A contractor charged $10K for the slab and the building cost another $10K, (can't recall if that included freight).
My brother and I, helped our father put it together.
 

Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
Agreed foam @ the ceiling does not work well except @ the roof the wall connection, Also, if you use foam, make sure you install all pipes and conduits and anything else you plan to put between the girts or furring.
 

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