Steal Them Off the Back Side

junquecol

Bruce
User
Last summer, discovered a hole in our roof. Slipped a piece of shingle under hole, and waited for fall to fix it. Apparently a limb went thru both layers of shingles, and caused OSB to rot. Fortunately, the hole was over soffit, and directly above vent strip, so damage was limiter to OSB, and shingles. This hole was on front side of house. This meant that replacement shingle, if new would stick out like a sore thumb. So this morning, went up on back side of house, which isn't visible from ground, and swapped out a couple of shingles with new ones. Took old shingles from the back and repaired the front. You can't tell I replaced a couple shingles because I stole them from the back side
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Agreed. Its in the same realm as taking good base moulding or shoe moulding from a closet to replace damaged moulding in a more exposed area.
 

CrealBilly

Jeff
Senior User
Last summer, discovered a hole in our roof. Slipped a piece of shingle under hole, and waited for fall to fix it. Apparently a limb went thru both layers of shingles, and caused OSB to rot. Fortunately, the hole was over soffit, and directly above vent strip, so damage was limiter to OSB, and shingles. This hole was on front side of house. This meant that replacement shingle, if new would stick out like a sore thumb. So this morning, went up on back side of house, which isn't visible from ground, and swapped out a couple of shingles with new ones. Took old shingles from the back and repaired the front. You can't tell I replaced a couple shingles because I stole them from the back side
Don't remember in NC but here in IL all the insurance companies pitch a hissy fit if a branch hangs over the house. Probably for a good reason such as yours. But we have also have some hellacious winds that rip through at times and all of a sudden without any good reason. Trees are not allowed to grow within fall distance of power lines either so power outages are very rare here. The electric Co-op will pay you to cut down a tree within fall distance of the power lines. Last I knew it was $150.00 per tree. Some of you guys in NC would be pretty well off if Duke did the same.
 

tri4sale

Daniel
Corporate Member
Don't remember in NC but here in IL all the insurance companies pitch a hissy fit if a branch hangs over the house. Probably for a good reason such as yours. But we have also have some hellacious winds that rip through at times and all of a sudden without any good reason. Trees are not allowed to grow within fall distance of power lines either so power outages are very rare here. The electric Co-op will pay you to cut down a tree within fall distance of the power lines. Last I knew it was $150.00 per tree. Some of you guys in NC would be pretty well off if Duke did the same.
Around here power companies will trim the trees back around the power lines, which leads to some really weird looking branch configurations, my favorite is the "U" shaped with the power lines going thru the open area, it's like just cut down the entire tree folks!!! And they will sometimes cut the entire tree down, unless you've got enough money and clout to fight them.
 

longreyhair

New User
longreyhair
Had a friend in Ga. with an old oak tree hanging over the corner of his house. Told him to call insurance and have it cut down. Cost was around $500. Insurance declined, tree fell down on house, $20,000 later and insurance paid.
 

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