Refreshing a Cutting Board

lothian

lothian
User
Hiya, fellas.

I've volunteered to refresh an 18 x 24 cutting block of a small artisan bakery here in Cary. I could simply sand progressive grit across each side of the thing, of course. But I believe running it thru a shaper and planer would do an all around better job, and quicker too. Problem is, I own neither a shaper nor a suitably sized planer. Any idea where in Raleigh I can take this thing?
 
Last edited:

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
When you say cutting block, I assume it's end grain. I would not put it through a planer with straight knives. A wide belt sander would be best, or otherwise a drum sander, but only if it's really in bad shape. Do you have any pictures? If it's just worn, sanding with a 6" ROS starting at 60 grit would probably get things cleaned up.
 

lothian

lothian
User
When you say cutting block, I assume it's end grain. I would not put it through a planer with straight knives. A wide belt sander would be best, or otherwise a drum sander, but only if it's really in bad shape. Do you have any pictures? If it's just worn, sanding with a 6" ROS starting at 60 grit would probably get things cleaned up.

Correct: yer typical end-grain construction cuttin' board. Its surfaces are not in bad shape at all. I have the impression that a clean, level cut from both a shaper and planer will render a better finish.
 

lothian

lothian
User
yeah... ok. I'm convinced.

<plaintive sigh>

Time to search the back of my tool cabinet for granddad's old smoothing plane.

<dolefully kicks pebble >
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I think a plane takes off too much especially if you’re not in the habit of using one daily.

a scraper will remove 1/1000-2/1000 each pass consistently and evenly without any tear out.
 

Bear Republic

Steve
Corporate Member
And don't forget to recondition the board with some mineral oil/wax blend. It is simple to make and really does wonders on renewing them.

For a great tutorial check out Jonathan Katz-Moses, he's got a great video.

Katz-Moses Goo
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
I've volunteered to refresh an 18 x 24 cutting block of a small artisan bakery here in Cary.
What's wrong with the end grain "block" now that you're going to "refresh"? What does the bakery use this for? Just kneading dough?

 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top