reclaimed mahogany - finished Kitchen work table

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JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Thanks to Phil's efforts to reduce waste in the landfill I scored 5 solid mahogany 6 panel doors. After cutting them up and planing them I ended up with a pile of lumber.


My daughter's moving into an apt. with a large kitchen space but little counter space so I designed a table. I made a 2'x4' end grain mahogany top finished with Waterlox (last coat drying as I type) - she does not plan on cutting directly on it. I re-sawed some birds eye maple for veneer for the drawer fronts, vacuum bagged onto mahogany and used a round over bit for the profile. As my daughter didn't want the maple colored at all and to minimize yellowing I put a diluted coat of super blond shellac on them in an attempt to pop the figure - not sure it did much though it still looks good. Put a coat of shellac on the mahogany slats and towel bar fixtures and sprayed everything with Target Coatings 6000 water base gloss "lacquer" and a last coat of satin. What a pain doing 56 slats. Very happy with the finish.
 

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Jeff

New User
Jeff
Nice lumber pile from Phil's offer. I'm also a fan of Waterlox Original Sealer/Finish and it should hold up well for the counter top.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Nice job. Thanks for using the scraps
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Looks great. How did you flatten the 2' x 4' end grain top?

I ran every glue up through a Delta 18-36" drum sander - therefor came out a lot narrower than when I started - Long time standing by a noisy machine!
 
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David Turner

New User
David
Wow John. You must have the patience of Jove to glue and machine all those pieces. Turned out beautiful.

Never ceases to amaze me how many of us woodworker's lives Phil touches !

David Turner
North Raleigh
 

JohnW

John
Corporate Member
I ran every glue up through a Delta 18-36" drum sander - therefor came out a lot narrower than when I started - Long time standing by a noisy machine!
Johnny, This is an awesome build. Great design and workmanship.
I've never run end grain glue-ups through my drum sander without burning. Could you tell us what grit you used, about what feed rate, and how much you could remove with each pass? My burning was mostly on the maple and cherry segments, but also on other species.
 

bowman

Board of Directors, Events Director
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Johnny, This is an awesome build. Great design and workmanship.
I've never run end grain glue-ups through my drum sander without burning. Could you tell us what grit you used, about what feed rate, and how much you could remove with each pass? My burning was mostly on the maple and cherry segments, but also on other species.
I don't have a drum sander, but from other posts indicate taking too deep of a pass will cause burning. Try taking a shallower bite and see how that does for you.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
John, I ran through with 80 grit then 100. Have to take very shallow passes, 1/64 range. Even so, pitch often builds up on the paper causing burn streaks. Sometimes I can scrape it off with a metal tool but it's then more prone to build up. I didn't bother to re-sand burnt pieces once I got them flat until the final assembly. Used new paper for the last few passes. I've soaked paper with pitch build up in mineral spirits and scraped them down but the paper shrinks and is tough or impossible to fit. Maybe I'll try putting it on the drum while it's still wet and let it dry to avoid shrinkage. Maple and cherry are worse. Wish I had one of the new sanders that automatically slow down when there's more stress.
 
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David Turner

New User
David
I build end grain cutting boards all the time with my cut-offs/scraps. I use water proof glue, run them over my 12" Jet jointer that has the carbide cutter head. (to remove all traces of the glue) Then thru the planer portion of the unit. It causes some chipping on the back edge of the block but I just run it across the table saw to clean up all 4 edges. Then take it to my 19/38 Performax belt sander and use 80 grit paper and run it on about 20/25 FPM and take only 1/64" at a time. I turn it over every time to the other side so as to keep it from getting too hot. Very little if any burning. Most of the cutting boards are a combination of walnut, cherry, maple, mahogany, and ash.

David Turner
North Raleigh
 

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
What was the mahogany reclaimed from? That was an awesome stack of wood. Like Christmas morning!
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
What was the mahogany reclaimed from? That was an awesome stack of wood. Like Christmas morning!
Reclaimed from five doors like these:



These were headed to the landfill - they look much better now. Thanks John
 

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patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
I'm all into salvaging wood, particularly the good stuff. Thanks for letting us know when it's available!
 

tri4sale

Daniel
Corporate Member
I salvaged 9 of those doors (picked up 10 but one was not solid core) and wish I could have grabbed more. Took me awhile to break down, and I'm 90% done with my first project with them (dang having to work full time) but I'm awed by some of the results people have done with the doors they picked up, especially this one!
 
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