Raised Garden Bed

patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
My wife just placed an order with me to build several of these raised garden beds. Does anyone know what the bottom looks like? It seems that it would have to be solid to prevent the dirt from washing out of the bed. If that's true, how does the bottom not rot? Does it have plastic across it before the soil is put in it?

Where's a good place to get the wood? The Hardwood Store? I trust the wood can be had for less than $143. Maybe not.

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Natural Cedar Raised Garden Bed at Lowe's
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
I made these this weekend... The wire spools I get free from my bother in law.

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I just used pine 2x10's and stapled landscaping fabric on the bottoms. I had thought about a true raised bed like your design ....I was going to glue runners on the inside and lay in short pieces of furring strip and lay the fabric on top of that.
 
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PeteM

Pete
Corporate Member
My wife just placed an order with me to build several of these raised garden beds. Does anyone know what the bottom looks like? It seems that it would have to be solid to prevent the dirt from washing out of the bed. If that's true, how does the bottom not rot? Does it have plastic across it before the soil is put in it?

Where's a good place to get the wood? The Hardwood Store? I trust the wood can be had for less than $143. Maybe not.
I built this for my wife a few months ago. Wood is PT 1x6's from a fence I took down. I sprayed the interior with automotive undercoat. Left some gaps in the bottom for drainage. Don't line it with plastic. It needs to have some drainage. Handles came from an old wheelbarrow a neighbor was throwing away. Wheels from Habitat for Humanity. I'm all in for about $15 give or take.
 

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junquecol

Bruce
User
For containers for soil, consider "bus trays" from a restaurant supply house. Drill drainage holes in the bottom. Don't worry about the weight, as they hold stacks of dishes and silverware. I buy mine from "United Restaurant Supply" on south Saunders street. Either bring a CC, or cash, as they no longer take checks for in store purchases. DAMWHIK
 
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patlaw

Mike
Corporate Member
For containers for soil, consider "bus trays" from a restaurant supply house. Drill drainage holes in the bottom. Don't worry about the weight, as they hold stacks of dishes and silverware. I buy mine from "United Restaurant Supply" on south Saunders street. Either bring a CC, or cash, as they no longer take checks for in store purchases.
Do you have a model number or link? I can't find a full catalog on their website. All I see is a flyer.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
It is made by Greene's Fences. Here is their description and pictures of the one that you posted.


  • Designed for drainage: small gaps between the floorboards allow excess water to drain away, while the included fabric liner holds soil in place
The planting part that holds the soil is 9.5" deep. I'd guess that the bottom boards have about 1/4"-3/8" gaps between them for drainage and the liner (landscape fabric, not plastic) keeps the soil from washing out.

4/4 Aromatic red cedar (Eastern red cedar) is $2.65/bf at the Hardwood Store and you'll need roughly 15-20 bf.(<$60)


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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Awesome, Jeff. That's extremely helpful! Thanks.
I forgot to add that cypress would also be a good substitute for eastern red cedar. It's about $4.50/bf and still cheap.

I built a few of these cypress planters several years ago on the same idea. We put our soil in plastic planter boxes from Lowe's so their is no soil fabric liner.
 

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Dan Bowman

Dan Bowman
Senior User
Advice from the plant/soil perspective: If you build raised beds suspended above the ground surface, as depicted, make sure you use a commercial potting mix that drains well, such as MiracleGro (not a plug, but it is a good product). If you simply fill with native soil, the suspension interrupts drainage and you're likely to have anaerobic soils and unhappy roots. If, alternatively, you build the raised bed on the native soil, and maintain soil continuity between the fill and the native soil, you will also maintain drainage and wouldn't need commercial soil mix.
 

dwminnich

Dave
Senior User
Also, make sure to line the inside with plastic or finish the inside of the sides with something to prevent the absorbtion of water. Otherwise when she waters, the uneven rates at which the inside and outside dry out will cause warping of the sides.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Lowes is running a "deal" on Mircale Gro potting mix. 25 quart bags are 2 for $12. Walmart is about the same price, but at Lowes with their card, you get 5% off. 50 qt bags, which I usually buy, are $14.99 at Lowes
 

Mountain City Bill

Mountain City Bill
Corporate Member
I made window boxes ( at our previous house) twice. The first time I used redwood and did not use a liner. Rotted in a few years. The second time I used removable liners and could not have been happier. The liners came out easy for cleaning and planting.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
Do you have a model number or link? I can't find a full catalog on their website. All I see is a flyer.
Try your local auto parts store for a garage drip tray. It's metal and could be somewhat cheaper than the bus trays.
Also, be careful when using old treated lumber, as it may contain Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) instead of the more recent formula which is arsenic free (ACQ).
 

zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
So after seeing this thread, I had to make one this afternoon. Mine is a bit less elegant, but I also needed to complete it quickly and use my dovetail jig. It’s made from cypress leftover from my porch build.

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Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
I lined my planting boxes with landscape fabric. They have lasted several years. Landscape fabric allows for drainage, plastic does not.
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
For wood to use for the bottom boards, osage orange and black locust seem to be the winners for not rotting. White oak would be my choice since it is readily available and not very expensive.

Roy G
 

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