Post Covid Workshop - List attached - SOLD OUT

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
I got my old crystal ball. It said everybody is anxious for a workshop and that June 19 was the right day.

Mike (Pop-Pop) and I have been planning this workshop - in full transparency, Mike has done all the work. He has designed and prototyped a fabulous bench top criss-cross vise. He will be the guest instructor while I will just be the host

Here are some photos of the prototype - mounted in my much more expensive Benchcrafted criss-cross vise. Mike's vise is smoother

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Mike will make the metal parts for the criss-cross prior to the class. Each student will need to provide there own 8/4 wood - we will forward an exact list of part sizes at a later date. I will have my equipment preset with jigs to speedup the operation, plus I will serve lunch

We have room for eight. Cost of the workshop is $75 which includes all the mechanical parts plus the cork/rubber facing that are not shown above.


Please respond via this post or PM and I will create the student list

Obviously, if my guess at a safe date of June 19 is wrong we will shift it

Happy Thanksgiving


Student List
1. Fred P
2. Johnny R
3. Michael Mathews
4. Burns - RedBeard
5. Donn - DRW
6. Richard - Graywolf
7. Danny Batchelor
8. Phil's guest -
 
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JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Looks like another well done vice by Mike. Is there a use of it other than changing the orientation 90 degrees and/or adding height to your work? Maybe answered my own question thinking about my old back bending over for detailed work.
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
Phil, Mike, What does the vise look like mounted to a bench? I might be in for this workshop but need to see how easily I can adapt it to my existing workbench! Thanks!
 

pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Phil, Mike, What does the vise look like mounted to a bench? I might be in for this workshop but need to see how easily I can adapt it to my existing workbench! Thanks!
Here is my vise clamped to the bench using C- clamps on the bracket. My experience has been the C-clamps hold the vise much more securely than F-clamps.
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pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Phil, Mike, What does the vise look like mounted to a bench? I might be in for this workshop but need to see how easily I can adapt it to my existing workbench! Thanks!
Another option is to make the bracket wider and bolt through dog holes like this:
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In round 3/4” dog holes, I use 1/2” carriage bolts, washers, and wing nuts. Those wing nuts are large enough to be able to hand tighten enough to secure the vise.
 
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pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Looks like another well done vice by Mike. Is there a use of it other than changing the orientation 90 degrees and/or adding height to your work? Maybe answered my own question thinking about my old back bending over for detailed work.
Yes, you did. The primary advantage is raising work to elbow height which is ideal for many tasks.

Another feature is a sort-of quick release. The vise chop slides freely in and out with whatever slack is left by the position of the nut on the screw. The slack can be quickly taken up by giving the handwheel a flip and it will move 2-3 inches along the screw.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
And here is some photos of one clamped to my joinery bench. I like having it removable from the bench as sometimes I need the entire flat surface of the bench top.
Another great design feature of this vise is having the clamping wheel in the rear allow you to stand closer to the vise jaws

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pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
And here is another mounting option which can work well on large to huge assembly tables.
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Here is a close-up:
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pop-pop

Man with many vises
User
Curious how is it used & what are the advantages?
First, it is a bench vise that can hold work pieces or act as a clamp for glue-ups.

One advantage is portability so you add a vise on a bench, picnic table, porch railing, or wherever. Another advantage is your work is usually at elbow height facilitating sawing, block planing, etc.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Actually Danny you are number seven. The last spot is being held for a member I promised he could have a spot
 

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