Pedestal Legs- how to??

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agrieco

anthony
Corporate Member
All,

My wife has requested a large, two pedestal trestle table for our dinning room. She's found the one she likes from a design perspective. It has a beefy, single, square pedestal at each end and has lots of detail in it.

For scale- the table top is 2 inches thick, making the pedestal at least 10 inches at the widest.

I'm puzzling over how to go about cutting this. Anyone have any experience or advise to share?

from research, it seems there are two general options:
- laminate the entire block together and then wrestle the beast on the bandsaw saving offcuts to keep the block so adjacent faces coult be cut
- get 4 boards of sufficient thickness, cut the profile in each of them then miter them together.

Any help, advise, pointers to videos, etc would be appreciated.


 

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Bear Republic

Steve
Corporate Member
It looks like a 4x4 center with a decorative pieces around it. It would depend on how wide you want the wrap to be, looks like 3" thick. You can glue boards to your thickness and the remove the excess. You can route or cut the profile you want for each side and attach each at 45° on the sides.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
For scale- the table top is 2 inches thick, making the pedestal at least 10 inches at the widest.

I'm puzzling over how to go about cutting this. Anyone have any experience or advise to share?
You lost me. What does the table top thickness have to do with the pedestal thickness or width?

Do you have a specific reference to this table that your wife has chosen?
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
I'd go with option "A". That looks like what is going on the pedestal in the photo and is probably SOP for that detail. It appears to be 12/4 stock glued up.
Lots of chances for mismatched miter joints to do "B".
Another option would be to find one of the old shaper heads that fit on an RAS or TS with the 3 removable bits and grind profiles on the bits to match your needs.
Either way, I see a lot of sanding in your future.....
 
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agrieco

anthony
Corporate Member
I'd go with option "A". That looks like what is going on the pedestal in the photo and is probably SOP for that detail. It appears to be 12/4 stock glued up.
Lots of chances for mismatched miter joints to do "B".
Another option would be to find one of the old shaper heads that fit on an RAS or TS with the 3 removable bits and grind profiles on the bits to match your needs.
Either way, I see a lot of sanding in your future.....
Shaper heads for a table saw...had no idea those existed. Interesting!
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
It's an old Craftsman attachment that had moulding bits, etc. that were about 1" wide. Usually 3 cutters on a head about 4-5" in diameter. I've had one for some time but don't use it that often as routers have pretty much taken its place on most applications. But, I can see where with a little setup they could work very well for this on the detail work. The large curves would be better addressed with a band saw IMO.
 

walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I have 2 of those "moulding heads" for the table saw. Mine were marketed by Sears as Craftsman. Kinda scary to use.

Jerry
 

zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
I think those molding cutters were also used on RAS. I wonder if clamping the piece and the moving cutter would be safer instead of sliding that large of a piece of wood through a table saw?

I also agree about cutting that large tapered piece with a band saw.

The leg in the picture seems fairly rough which may allow some leeway with how precise each side of the leg needs to be.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Unless you are looking for really difficult project to stretch yourself you might want to check out places like www.hansonwoodturning.com/tablebases.html. Not a clue how expensive they are but they are tooled up for this type of thing.
Jim I think that's the way to go. Their pedestals are very close to the photo of the base that is agreeable to his wife. Depending on the cost, this looks like a good way to "get er done" my friend.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Anthony
Back a few years ago I tackled a very similar project - a massive heartwood pine table - almost 10' long and 40" wide, with a 2" thick top. I did this for someone else and was provided a Restoration Hardware link as well. I used two uprights on each end, and the same base as you have pictured. The uprights I used were purchased form Osborne Wood products, and later on I did a matching bench with custom sized uprights provided by Osborne. My uprights were selected to match pillars already in place in the new kitchen - and were lathe turned, not square and molded. So this is not a direct answer to your question.

I did a number of lengthy WIP posts on NCWW. Here is a link to a not very detailed one, but if you search "Henry W" and "heartwood pine" you ought to find the 3 or 4 build posts as well
https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?p=353122#poststop

Here a link to the last build thread, which I think has links to the earlier build threads
https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?t=37094&highlight=heartwood+pine

I hope this helps.

AND if you are interested in some 2" thick heartwood pine (8' minimum length, 5" width; dimensions from memory), I have some left from that build that I would be happy to sell you (for less than half of what I paid for it). PM me if interested.
 

agrieco

anthony
Corporate Member
Anthony
Back a few years ago I tackled a very similar project - a massive heartwood pine table - almost 10' long and 40" wide, with a 2" thick top. I did this for someone else and was provided a Restoration Hardware link as well. I used two uprights on each end, and the same base as you have pictured. The uprights I used were purchased form Osborne Wood products, and later on I did a matching bench with custom sized uprights provided by Osborne. My uprights were selected to match pillars already in place in the new kitchen - and were lathe turned, not square and molded. So this is not a direct answer to your question.

I did a number of lengthy WIP posts on NCWW. Here is a link to a not very detailed one, but if you search "Henry W" and "heartwood pine" you ought to find the 3 or 4 build posts as well
https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?p=353122#poststop

Here a link to the last build thread, which I think has links to the earlier build threads
https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?t=37094&highlight=heartwood+pine

I hope this helps.

AND if you are interested in some 2" thick heartwood pine (8' minimum length, 5" width; dimensions from memory), I have some left from that build that I would be happy to sell you (for less than half of what I paid for it). PM me if interested.
Thank you for the informative post. PM in flight.
 

agrieco

anthony
Corporate Member
Jim I think that's the way to go. Their pedestals are very close to the photo of the base that is agreeable to his wife. Depending on the cost, this looks like a good way to "get er done" my friend.
I got a really rapid response from Mr Hanson. Just for reference, the table legs, pedestal and stretcher kits most closely resembling the reference image I posted start at about 1000 for pine (8" pedestal, shipped) and go up from there. For reference, Walnut, 10" pedestal is approx. $2,000 shipped. Beautiful work for sure- however I'm probably going DIY or convince my better half to like a design where the pedestal parts are more readily available.
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
All,

My wife has requested a large, two pedestal trestle table for our dinning room. She's found the one she likes from a design perspective. It has a beefy, single, square pedestal at each end and has lots of detail in it.

For scale- the table top is 2 inches thick, making the pedestal at least 10 inches at the widest.

I'm puzzling over how to go about cutting this. Anyone have any experience or advise to share?

from research, it seems there are two general options:
- laminate the entire block together and then wrestle the beast on the bandsaw saving offcuts to keep the block so adjacent faces coult be cut
- get 4 boards of sufficient thickness, cut the profile in each of them then miter them together.

Any help, advise, pointers to videos, etc would be appreciated.



Maybe try this ?
 

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