Oscillating Spindle Sander Wanted (I think)

Flute Maker

Mike
User
I am pondering the idea of a oscillating spindle sander.I am unsure about which one is a good one but dont want to break the bank Just thinking at this point.I have a few operations I could use them on in my flute making.Any ideas would be helpful or if someone has one they might want want to sell just let me know! Thanks!
 

Martin Roper

Martin
User
I have the Ridgid spindle sander and it is one of the most useful machines in my shop.

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There are several similar ones including Wen, Grizzly, etc., but I have no experience with those.
 

beloitdavisja

James
Corporate Member
I have the ridgid one as well. Works great, and it was useful enough for me I don't need my 6"disc/4"belt combo sander. I keep the belt on it 90% of the time since it has a large and small diameter curves on either end. I have it on a flip cart with my planer on the other side.

The ridgids are pretty easy to find on the used market, and usually in good condition. I picked up mine for $125, perfect condition minus the smallest spindle sleeve missing. I ordered a replacement (actually 2 since it was a pair) on amazon for $10.
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
+3 on the Ridgid....not very sophisticated by very versatile...It gets a lot of use in my shop. Seems like I am always touching something up on it. It was also invaluable in making the Maloof style rocker this past year.
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have the Jet. It works for me. Sanding spindles come from Klingspor.
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Went with the WEN. Most stroke for the price. A lot look the same but check the specs. I use it more than I thought. Same with my disk sander. ( HF )
 

cyclopentadiene

Update your profile with your name
User
The triton handheld looks interesting. Rockler now offers a router table base for it so you can switch between an OSS And router in your table. Great space saver. I have an older porter cable that I end up moving all over the shop because it always seems to be in the way.
 

ErnieM

Ernie
Corporate Member
I have the Ridgid and it's a great tool - with one exception. The front section of the table tilts a couple of inches away from the spindle. Not a problem if you're sanding at 90 degrees, but if you're sanding bevels, the distance from the tilted table to the spindle leaves too much wood unsupported, making the sanding difficult. I'd much prefer a sander that allows the entire table to tilt.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have the Wen, was afraid it would not be much good due to the low price. But, it has done all I needed so far.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
I have an older Ryobi - thought I would use it enough to justify purchase (used on CL) but so far none of my projects has needed it (I also have a frequently used mid-size belt-disk sander). Long term thinking here, I know I'll want to use it, and when I do, it'll be ready.
It's just a dust collector now, but someday it'll given it's own opportunity to generate some dust!
 

Keye

Keye
Corporate Member
Whatever you buy make sure the spindles are long enough for the biggest piece you will sand. Mine is 4.5" and I am constantly flipping the piece over.

I bought a Drimmel to sand my dogs nails. Looking through Amazon one day and found out you can buy different size spindles, some very small, and a variety of grits. This has cut my hand sanding time 80% at least. Buy an off brand and they are very cheap. Just thought I would throw this out as FYI.
 

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