New to me no 6

JCAlton

New User
Cody Alton
Picked this type 13 Stanley No 6 for $30. In the process of cleaning it up best I can now.

I've removed most of the rust, need to hit it with a wire wheel to clean it up the rest of the way. The iron definitely needs sharpening, slight regrind to straighten the edge out.

Next up is removing the black paint from where it shouldn't be. Everything except the iron and chip breaker were painted black. Including under the frog.

I'm thinking about taking it to the machine shop and getting them to sandblast it, would that be a bad idea? Not enjoying the idea of getting all the paint from the frog seat off.

Out of 3 in 1 oil but didn't realize until after the vinegar bath and scrubbing so all of the parts are on the counter soaked in vegetable oil until i can run to the store tomorrow.
 

Attachments

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
More pics would help. Unless it was on the bearing surfaces I'd leave it. I certainly wouldn't pay somebody to remove it. You got a good deal on a user.... Tune it up, sharpen and go to work.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Rather than sand blast, see if they provide plastic media blast. That will remove all the paint and some of the surface rust, but will not pit or etch any of the metal. Walnut shells also work, but the process is slower.

I have a couple #6s, and they get used frequently. For anything over a 2' dimension, or the edge of a thick board, the added weight and length makes it easier (for me) to control it through the push than a #5. Good buy!!
 

JCAlton

New User
Cody Alton
More pics would help. Unless it was on the bearing surfaces I'd leave it. I certainly wouldn't pay somebody to remove it. You got a good deal on a user.... Tune it up, sharpen and go to work.
Are the sides painted...? That would have to go. The ROS should make short work of that.
It is on the bearing surfaces. Also on the sides and bottom of the plane :p Will definitely be removing from those surfaces. Probably the lever cap too, I like the shiny lever cap haha.

I made the mistake of sandblasting a #5 one time. Would not do that again.

A little sandpaper will take care of it without damaging the surface.
Thats the feedback I was looking for, don't want to do anything that wouldn't be good for it. I'll go about it manually.

Rather than sand blast, see if they provide plastic media blast. That will remove all the paint and some of the surface rust, but will not pit or etch any of the metal. Walnut shells also work, but the process is slower.

I have a couple #6s, and they get used frequently. For anything over a 2' dimension, or the edge of a thick board, the added weight and length makes it easier (for me) to control it through the push than a #5. Good buy!!
The guy I got it from received it from his great aunt who's late husband had it. I'm looking forward to finishing cleaning it up. Still learning how to use the hand planes.. well, actually haven't started learning yet, been trying to reorganize the shop to make the workflow easier.
This is long, but informative:
I've watched it before but do plan on watching it again as I'm restoring this one. I think I've watched most of Paul Sellers' videos at this point. That man has more wood knowledge in his pinky finger than I have in total.
 

JCAlton

New User
Cody Alton
The iron has a slight bend to it, not sure if it was dropped at some point. Top of the tote has a chip in it that makes me think it was dropped. I'll try to take a picture of it off the plane and on it. Maybe the experts here can tell me if it'll be a problem.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Engine paint 5 or 6 coats simulates jappanning pretty well.

Adhesive sandpaper rolls are your friend. Tablesaw top, or a piece of melamine works well for flattening.

I've seen people describe ways to hammer them back, but an old iron makes a handy tool for trimming things.

A replacement blade/cap iron combos would be an upgrade.
 

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
+1

Engine paint 5 or 6 coats simulates jappanning pretty well.

Adhesive sandpaper rolls are your friend. Tablesaw top, or a piece of melamine works well for flattening.

I've seen people describe ways to hammer them back, but an old iron makes a handy tool for trimming things.

A replacement blade/cap iron combos would be an upgrade.
 

Sourwould

New User
Taylor
The iron has a slight bend to it, not sure if it was dropped at some point. Top of the tote has a chip in it that makes me think it was dropped. I'll try to take a picture of it off the plane and on it. Maybe the experts here can tell me if it'll be a problem.
All the one's I've had have been bowed along their length. It's doesn't really matter, as the cam lock will just bend the iron to the bed of the frog. If it has a sharp bend, that's another story.

If it's bowed across its width, one sharp blow with a plastic hammer will take that out.
 

JCAlton

New User
Cody Alton
Engine paint 5 or 6 coats simulates jappanning pretty well.

Adhesive sandpaper rolls are your friend. Tablesaw top, or a piece of melamine works well for flattening.

I've seen people describe ways to hammer them back, but an old iron makes a handy tool for trimming things.

A replacement blade/cap iron combos would be an upgrade.
I have the adhesive sandpaper already. So good to go with that. The paint actually looks pretty good. I'm going to clean it up where it's not supposed to be and leave the rest for now. If I notice issues I'll remove it and give the engine enamel a try.

Going off what sourwould said, its probably OK. It flattens out when tensioned since the bow is lengthwise so probably a non issue. I will work with what I have now, if I upgrades the iron and cap the benefits would be lost on me.

Picked up some more 3&1 today so onto finishing cleaning up the parts, then I'll work on the sides and bottom of the body. Haven't been sleeping well and have stayed constantly busy recently so hitting the easy stuff today then gonna take the rest of the night off to relax and reset.

Once I finish organizing the shop and restoring the plane (another issue, no where to do the restoration in the shop right now so been stealing the wife's counter space), I have a 4 wheeler and go kart in need of maintenance for the kids. Those will be pulled into my newly organized shop as soon as I get room for them.
 

Sourwould

New User
Taylor
For what it's worth, I prefer the original irons because they are fairly soft and sharpen quickly by hand. Disregard if you hollow grind with a grinder.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
Senior User
Lot of good advice here - I prefer an original, if not perfect, look for my elderly hand tools. A matter of respect I guess. Hope the bent iron doesn’t require replacement - I try to check these things over well when I buy them but sometimes...using my planes much more than when I got them and love their handiness. You will to.
 

JCAlton

New User
Cody Alton
It appears that its not affecting functionality. Still have some work to do on resetting the angle and sharpening it but its coming together pretty nicely.
 

Sourwould

New User
Taylor
It appears that its not affecting functionality. Still have some work to do on resetting the angle and sharpening it but its coming together pretty nicely.
As long as the angle is less than the bed angle of the iron, it will cut. Remember that the carpenters that used these tools were generally uneducated and did a lot of work by eye. What I mean by this is, don't worry too much about the super fine details.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I'm back at work and only available on weekends now, but still willing and able to teach hand plane refurbishing, set up, sharpening, and using. Also sharpening anything that cuts, dovetails, hand tool wood working, machine set up and use, etc.

PM for details.
 

JCAlton

New User
Cody Alton
As long as the angle is less than the bed angle of the iron, it will cut. Remember that the carpenters that used these tools were generally uneducated and did a lot of work by eye. What I mean by this is, don't worry too much about the super fine details.
I didn't know that it wasn't that critical but should've been more specific. The edge itself was in pretty bad shape, no grinder so attacked it by hand. Much better now but still could use more work.

Whoever had it last didn't know how to put one back together so the frog was as far up as it could be and the iron stuck out the bottom 1/4" or so. Pretty jagged edge.

Took it for a test run last night and it made shavings so going in the right direction.

I'm back at work and only available on weekends now, but still willing and able to teach hand plane refurbishing, set up, sharpening, and using. Also sharpening anything that cuts, dovetails, hand tool wood working, machine set up and use, etc.

PM for details.
I will be taking you up on that. Just have to free up a weekend to make the ride.
 

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