New Circuit Tester

bowman

Board of Directors, Events Director
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
and for those young minds that are learning about electricity without tripping the breaker
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junquecol

Bruce
User
Yeah, go into a lab that had switched outlets. Pop a few 1/2 watt resisters in a few outlets and when the switch was hit BOOM! For me, working by myself, a very loud radio plugged into circuit works well. Just be sure it doesn't have automatic battery back up. DAMHIK
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Yeah, go into a lab that had switched outlets. Pop a few 1/2 watt resisters in a few outlets and when the switch was hit BOOM! For me, working by myself, a very loud radio plugged into circuit works well. Just be sure it doesn't have automatic battery back up. DAMHIK
I used to use the radio trick Bruce - then one day I could not find the right breaker. Yup, the new radio had not been trained and was not compliant with the test procedure.
 
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Oka

Casey
Corporate Member
Talking about electricity -This is something I witnessed:

In 2009 I was building a new surgery center. I was the Project Executive/Sr Const. Mgr. for this project and the project had amongst other things a MRI. For those that do not know, a MRI is a Magnetic resonator that creates specific frequency fields that the protons (because our body contains iron) in our body reacts to which then, the computer translates into images.
Anyway, for these to work you need to create a Faraday cage to prevent any radio frequencies interfering with the MRI.
The way they usually go this is to sheet the walls with sheet rock , then plywood, then copper sheeting glued on (usually 30-36 ga). All studs in Hospitals are steel.

Sorry for lead up. So, to make sure the screws nor and other part of the metal substrate framing is touching the copper to make sure there will be no possible RF bleed in.
So........... how do you test for this ??? ..........well with electricity of course ! So this contractor's method was just take a extension cord with a plug on one end and an alligator clip on the hot lead and a alligator clip attached to a screwdriver for the neutral..........of course silly me.
Then they clipped the hot lead to the stud framing and plugged it in and went around the room shorting the neutral lead to the wall, If there was a screw heads that were touching copper it would short and blow a hole through the thin copper. They could then reset the screw head and repair that new hole with copper foil tape.

When I saw the job lights dim and I heard a "crack" I ran over and saw what they were doing. Remember this was job that had several sub contractors on it and this clown just electrified the steel studs?!!. Thank God no one was shocked and there were no Safety people onsite. Anyway nothing surprises me anymore .......... until the next idiot comes up with something even crazier ! .......... but it did do the job.
 
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cobraguy

Clay
Corporate Member
Got a kick out of the laser warning.

A friend who worked on laser range finders in a USAF research outfit came up with a similar sign as a joke during one of the tests. Somehow, the warning sign made it into the technical manual. It was too expensive to reprint the manual for just that correction, so it stayed for a number of years until the manual went in for a complete rewrite. Luckily, the system wasn't fielded very widely so everyone knew the story..... and the proper safety precautions.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Corporate Member
Yeah, go into a lab that had switched outlets. Pop a few 1/2 watt resisters in a few outlets and when the switch was hit BOOM! For me, working by myself, a very loud radio plugged into circuit works well. Just be sure it doesn't have automatic battery back up. DAMHIK
A corded drill with a trigger lock will do the trick. If you try it with a belt sander it will try to come and find you to tell you that the circuit is on.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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