need to round over inside edge

Keye

Keye
Corporate Member
I need to round over curved inside edges in an area to small for a router. What is the best thing to use? I am sure there is a correct name for what I need but I do not know what it is. I have looked at a number of tool web sites but can not find a "thingy" as my wife called what I need. A flat chisel would work but leave more sanding than I want to do in these small spaces. Besides I do not have a single chisel sharp enough to do this. As I told Mike the only thing I can come close to putting an edge on is an ax. He said if I will come his way there is a chance he can even teach me. My wife keeps bugging me about doing this and I plan to. I am pretty sure she is tired of looking at my face after the last year.
 

bowman

Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Can you get a file/rasp into the confined space? Follow up with small sanding block
 

tvrgeek

Scott
User
One of those gold "grit" rasps.
Ball bit in a die grinder ( Fordham, Dremel)
Carving gouge

You do need to master sharpening. :)
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
Coving is what I would call it -rounding the inside corner. Want the Medium or fine. Make a mock up to practise so you know how to Finesse it correctly. Otherwise, you will have a destroyed piece of wood.
rotary burr.JPG
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walnutjerry

Jerry
Senior User
I need to round over curved inside edges in an area to small for a router. What is the best thing to use? I am sure there is a correct name for what I need but I do not know what it is. I have looked at a number of tool web sites but can not find a "thingy" as my wife called what I need. A flat chisel would work but leave more sanding than I want to do in these small spaces. Besides I do not have a single chisel sharp enough to do this. As I told Mike the only thing I can come close to putting an edge on is an ax. He said if I will come his way there is a chance he can even teach me. My wife keeps bugging me about doing this and I plan to. I am pretty sure she is tired of looking at my face after the last year.
I think what you may have in your mind is a riffler. That is a small file for detailed carving. Should do the job for you.
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
If a scratch block can be made to fit, it's what I'd use. I made most of mine from old hacksaw blades and a piece of scrap.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Sponge or flexible sanding block.

A ww'er who can't sharpen is like a pit crew that can't change a tire -- get on over there!! :D :D
 

Keye

Keye
Corporate Member
As usual I should have included more info and maybe a picture. The curves are really tight and the space is less than 1/4" in some areas. I believe Jerry's solution is probably my best bet.

Need to also take a look at a carving gouge for some areas.

I do appreciate the input. I learned some things I did not know about which may help me on other situations in the future.
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
Hey DrBob! I can change a tire, but sharpening has been a problem throughout my woodworking life, and it's been a long life. Started in 7th grade shop, and I'm turning 81. I'm still working on it. The best things I've come up with to help me along is a WorkSharp (now with CBN disc) & a OneWay lathe tool rig. I am in the process of upfitting my grinder with a CBN wheel. This may solve some of my problems. I also have a 1/2 in. piece of float glass & a Veritas sharpening system for sandpaper. Along with all that I have various Arkansas stones. As you can see I'm still plodding along. I've read all the books and watched the videos, and I'm trying.

Pop :p
 

Keye

Keye
Corporate Member
Pop, I am jealous. I did not start converting my golf club shop into a wood working shop until I was past 40. I have a lot more to show for my woodworking efforts than golf. I was to far along with family and career when I figured out I would have been happier if I had done some kind of apprenticeship rather than earning college degrees.
 

Steve_Honeycutt

Chat Administartor
Steve
Corporate Member
I would suggest looking into some of the Dremel bits. Many carvers use these for some of the finer details in carvings, like veins in feathers. You can also get very small sanding drums for use on a Dremel. If you don't have a Dremel tool, some of these bits can be used in a drill. These bits come in diamond, ruby, steel, wire brushes, polishing felt, etc. Amazon has many choices. I'm not a salesman, but these can come in handy for many things.
 

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