Need some simple toy ideas for kids

Billm0066

Bill
User
I made a bunch of baby toys for clients but would like some ideas for toys for kids that are a little older. 2-5yo. Either cnc or with power tools. Prefer simple things that can be made with scraps. Any good plans out there? Maybe cars that roll or something else?
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
David Wakefield's books have wonderful plans for wheeled toys that are a way above the mundane. The later versions are the best. Toy cars with inset wheels are nice.
2x4 big box spongewood toys are all over the internet if you want easy and unimaginative. Kids will know the difference if there's a choice, but they'll accept whatever is put in front of them.

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David Wakefield plans I used for my grand kid

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David Wakefield plans I used for my grand kid
 

TBoomz

New User
Ron
Since you're using scraps, I'd suggest jigsaw puzzles for the older kids. And make small wood boxes to store them in. That way the kids could bring the puzzles on family outings. (I did that for my niece [once upon a time]).
But would also suggest cutting with bandsaw to get pieces too large to be swallowed by the 2 y.o.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
If you're really looking for cheap up front costs on a good toy, there's this alternative. With all its crudeness, the grand kid loves this tub toy. It also makes a storage container for smaller tub toys. It is surprisingly durable and easy to re-make in the event of damage.

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jfynyson

Jeremy
User
Not even joking either of these always seem to get played with the most & everyone seems to have them:
  • Any large cardboard box
  • Old remote control
  • Old cell phone
After observing child behaviors over the years, remembering how I was, and even seeing it in my kids I am fully convinced these 3 items are all the toys they need (for indoor playing). Of course every bday & Christmas no one listens to me. It would certainly save everyone a lot of money and keep some junk out of the land fills
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
  • Old remote control
  • Old cell phone
I noticed this new phenomenon with our fairly new grand baby. Being born in 1945, I didn't have these things and neither did my kids, but modern kids, its a whole different world. They seem to have learned to push buttons to get a reaction. Lots of their toys do this. I had my camera out the other day and captured a sequence that showed yet another thing that must be kept in the kid-proof areas.

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Of course, for outdoors, there's always a little creek.
 

Raymond

Raymond
Corporate Member
Allow me to suggest three books you may want to look before you decide to buy them.

Making Toys that Teach by Les Neufeld - ISNB# 1-56158-606-4 (2003)

Making Heirloom Toys by Jim Makowicki - ISBN-10: 1-56158-112-7 (1996)

Wooden Toy Manual by Richard Blizzard - ISBN# 978-0-85733-220-2 (2012)
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
I checked out those books. There are some really great projects shown in those books.
I'd love to see more photos of toys guys here have made.

Both the gorilla and the frog above have 17 parts, but only have five parts that need to be made per toy. The rest are dowels, pins, and wheels, all bought ready made.
There's still some labor involved.

Below are photos of work in progress on the gorilla toy. The body is scroll sawn from 1-1/2" thick cherry. The arms are cut from 9/16" cherry. As big of a pain as these seemed to be, the end results were well worth it.

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Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
Just as a reminder, toys for 3 and under must not have parts that will fit through the cardboard tube from a toilet paper roll.
 

jfynyson

Jeremy
User
Just as a reminder, toys for 3 and under must not have parts that will fit through the cardboard tube from a toilet paper roll.
Sorry I forgot a toy to list in my previous list & Berta just reminded me: add a cardboard tube from a paper towel or toilet paper roll
 

Billm0066

Bill
User
I appreciate the responses, but these toys are for clients kids. I cant give them old cell phones, tubes, or cut up milk jugs lol. For my own thats fine. I was just looking for things I can batch out so I can make several at a time. I've made several animal rattles and the infants and toddlers like them. Im looking for toys for kids that are a little older. like 3-5. They need to be relatively quick, or something I can batch out to bring my time per toy down. If they are wheeled toys I would probably just buy the wheels to save time.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
There's a bewildering array of wheeled toy designs on the internet. Give us some examples of things you don't think are appropriate for your clients.

Here's just one example of toys that appear easy to make.
LINK

Are there limits as to the equipment and resources available to you. A big part of the toy process is sanding. Do you have sanding machines like spindle sanders that will reduce the time?

Without some parameters of effort and expenses, we're just taking shots in the dark.
 

Raymond

Raymond
Corporate Member
I appreciate the responses, but these toys are for clients kids. I cant give them old cell phones, tubes, or cut up milk jugs lol. For my own thats fine. I was just looking for things I can batch out so I can make several at a time. I've made several animal rattles and the infants and toddlers like them. Im looking for toys for kids that are a little older. like 3-5. They need to be relatively quick, or something I can batch out to bring my time per toy down. If they are wheeled toys I would probably just buy the wheels to save time.
Bill, my suggestion of "Making Toys that Teach by Les Neufeld - ISNB# 1-56158-606-4 (2003) " meets the criteria you stated. The majority of the toys in this book can be batched produced.
 

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