Need advice on this walnut and cherry

kelLOGg

Bob
Senior User
I have a friend whose father had a cherry and walnut tree milled in the 50s; the lumber has been stickered in a barn until about a month ago when I picked it up to evaluate it for her for possible uses. All the sap wood is eaten by insects but the walnut heart is good shape with only minor insect tracks. The cherry heart has not fared as well but there are still some beautiful boards.

I partially edged the boards to get an idea of useable widths and planed both sides to expose the grain. The thicknesses varied greatly as originally sawn so a lot of planing was required and I ended up with boards ¾” to 1.5” thick. The cherry yielded about 62 sq ft, widths 4.5” to 13.5” and lengths of 9.5’. The walnut yielded about 113 sq ft, widths from 6” to 16” and lengths to 8’. The colors are deep and beautiful and I hope the pics reveal such.

My friend would love a dining room table but I don’t have the skill for this although I could make the top. (I knew her father and would really like to see her get a table from trees he saved.) I am thinking about suggesting she purchase a suitable pedestal (expandable or not) and I could affix a top to it. Is this a reasonable approach? Sources of such pedestals are needed, too, as well as other approaches. Thanks.
 

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zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
Bob,

That lumber is pretty!

Is your friend’s heart set on a pedestal table? Or could you make four square or tapered legs for her?

If you glued up the legs from multiple pieces you could probably use some of the heart if the holes aren’t all the way through (possibly fill the holes with epoxy—but not necessary).
 

kelLOGg

Bob
Senior User
She hasn't mentioned any kind or size of table. I am just trying to explore options. I am reluctant to commit myself to it due to the time required and I fear I am not able to do the wood justice. My shop is a barn (unheated) so gluing in the winter (with TiteBond III) is problematic, equipment is limited: table saw, drill press, hand sander, jointer are about it. So, I am looking for shortcuts. I think I could get inspired to do it but may regret overcommitting. I think there is enough walnut to do it all.... if I decide to.
 

Dan Bowman

Dan Bowman
Senior User
You might consider looking on Etsy; search for "table pedestal base". Many are more modern and made of metal but quite attractive and easy to attach to a top.
 

Melinapex

Mark
User
Bob,
I had the same problem, so I bought a table base kit from Osborne wood products and made a top. Worked out great.. it was not cheap but it was exactly what I wanted.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Looks like powder post beetles got into the wood at some point. It might be wise to determine whether or not they are still active.
 

DSWalker

David
Corporate Member
She hasn't mentioned any kind or size of table. I am just trying to explore options. I am reluctant to commit myself to it due to the time required and I fear I am not able to do the wood justice. My shop is a barn (unheated) so gluing in the winter (with TiteBond III) is problematic, equipment is limited: table saw, drill press, hand sander, jointer are about it. So, I am looking for shortcuts. I think I could get inspired to do it but may regret overcommitting. I think there is enough walnut to do it all.... if I decide to.
You can do it. My very first project was similar to yours with less to work with. No jointer. Made in my barn full of horses. I had to pull the equipment in and out of the feed room everytime I worked on it. ...and lock up the animals! Lol

Was it perfect? No. But my daughter loves it. And it didnt turn out half bad at all.
 

kelLOGg

Bob
Senior User
NICE. Your skill level looks fine to me. And you did it with horses around:). I'm beginning to act like I am going to do it, after all, the wood was waiting in the barn for 50+ years. What's another 10:D. I'll talk with my friend and get details on what she wants and see if we can match it with what I can do.
 

cheryllewis

cheryl
Senior User
I have a friend whose father had a cherry and walnut tree milled in the 50s; the lumber has been stickered in a barn until about a month ago when I picked it up to evaluate it for her for possible uses. All the sap wood is eaten by insects but the walnut heart is good shape with only minor insect tracks. The cherry heart has not fared as well but there are still some beautiful boards.

I partially edged the boards to get an idea of useable widths and planed both sides to expose the grain. The thicknesses varied greatly as originally sawn so a lot of planing was required and I ended up with boards ¾” to 1.5” thick. The cherry yielded about 62 sq ft, widths 4.5” to 13.5” and lengths of 9.5’. The walnut yielded about 113 sq ft, widths from 6” to 16” and lengths to 8’. The colors are deep and beautiful and I hope the pics reveal such.

My friend would love a dining room table but I don’t have the skill for this although I could make the top. (I knew her father and would really like to see her get a table from trees he saved.) I am thinking about suggesting she purchase a suitable pedestal (expandable or not) and I could affix a top to it. Is this a reasonable approach? Sources of such pedestals are needed, too, as well as other approaches. Thanks.
It would look beautiful on a black metal base.....even if I do sell lumber!
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
How about buying a cheap expandable dining table and replacing the top? This way you can have a leaf or two. The base could be painted or stripped and stained.
 

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